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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 89 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


'Franny' director Andrew Renzi plots next films

6 July 2015 3:41 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Upcoming projects include a ‘reimagining’ of Billy Wilder classic Sunset Boulevard.

Us director Andrew Renzi, whose feature debut Franny is showing at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Kviff) (July 3-11), is lining up his next projects, including a ‘reimagining’ of Billy Wilder’s 1950 classic Sunset Boulevard.

Richard Gere, Theo James and Dakota Fanning star in Renzi’s debut Franny, in which a philanthropist meddles in the lives of newly-married couples in an attempt to relive his past.

Samuel Goldwyn Films picked up the drama after its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival.

The 30-year-old director, whose 2014 documentary Fishtail about Montana cowboys also premiered at Tribeca and was then picked up by Netflix, will next return to Montana to film another documentary, this time about miners.  

Speaking to ScreenDaily following a Kv industry panel, director Renzi confirmed that he aims to shoot the documentary later this year or early next year with regular producing partner Andrew Corkin ([link »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Movie Review – The Seven Year Itch (1955)

30 June 2015 1:21 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Seven Year Itch, 1955.

Directed by Billy Wilder.

Starring Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell.

Synopsis:

Married man, Sherman, has to contend with the gorgeous woman upstairs when his family are away over the summer.

That shot. A train whirrs past beneath the vent and wind blows her dress up as she struggles to hold it down. She doesn’t move away from the revealing situation and instead tells he male companion, “isn’t it delicious?”. Her white, pleated dress design and platinum blonde hair means that this is Marilyn Monroe. A crowd had gathered, between 52nd and 53rd Street in New York City. Billy Wilder is in production of The Seven Year Itch, and photographer Sam Shaw is snapping the icon of the 1950’s. This became the moment that became a 26ft tall statue by Seward Johnson in Chicago, California and New Jersey, in Forever Marilyn. It is also the unforgettable, »

- Simon Columb

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Mel Gibson: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

30 June 2015 1:15 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Mel Gibson, whom I interviewed for Venice Magazine in late 2000, was my first real childhood hero I sat down with. If you were a Gen-x male, Mel Gibson was the closest thing we had to Paul Newman, Steve McQueen and Sean Connery: a guy's guy whom guys wanted to emulate and women wanted to copulate. If you were a guy who liked girls, the math in the previous equation was pretty simple: be like Mel. Sadly, Gibson's life has taken a very public turn for the worse in the last decade, since his personal legal and troubles stemming from a 2006 DUI arrest in Malibu were made public, one from which his image has yet to fully recover. It was an unfortunate fall from grace for a guy who literally had Hollywood, and the world, in the palm of his hand after sweeping the 1995 Oscars with his box office smash "Braveheart. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Sherlock Holmes: 10 offbeat takes on the Great Detective

29 June 2015 5:49 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From spoofs to point-and-click adventure games, here are 10 of the most memorable unusual incarnations of Sherlock Holmes...

We don’t know a great deal about the content of the 90-minute Sherlock special set to air later this year, but one thing has emerged from the set photos and tantalising titbits of information we’ve seen so far. Sherlock Holmes and John Watson will be in nineteenth-century garb, pitching them back into the setting of the legendary detective’s original adventures: 1895, to be precise. Why that happens is as yet unclear, but all will be revealed.

For those still craving their Holmes fix in the meantime, the new film Mr. Holmes offers us Ian McKellen’s take on the character, musing upon an old case as he looks back on his long career from the vantage point of retirement. Jonny Lee Miller’s ultra-modern, Us-based Sherlock will be entering his fourth »

- louisamellor

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Munich Films Festival Attracts Best of Global Filmmaking

25 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Munich has been a film-industry center for about a century. Camera company Arri launched there in 1917, and Bavaria Film Studios was established in 1919, although its founder, Peter Ostermayr, had been making movies in the city for several years before. Alfred Hitchcock shot his first released feature there in 1925, and was followed by such leading filmmakers as Billy Wilder, John Huston and Stanley Kubrick.

It is within that tradition that Diana Iljine, CEO and director of the Munich Film Festival, presents her event, which opens with David Oelhoffen’s Algeria-set Western “Far From Men,” starring Viggo Mortensen; the closing-night feature will be Matteo Garrone’s “Tale of Tales,” pictured above, starring Salma Hayek, fresh from its Cannes debut.

“Munich has always been a movie town,” Iljine says. The city remains one of the world’s great movie-business hubs, and that’s one reason why the festival attracts 2,000 or so film industry professionals, »

- Leo Barraclough

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The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

22 June 2015 4:02 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are »

- Andre Soares

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Actress Marthe Keller Remembers Her First Big Hollywood Film

19 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

U.S. film fans probably know actress Marthe Keller from such ’70s hits as “Marathon Man” and “Black Sunday,” or perhaps Claude Lelouch’s “And Now My Love.” True aficionados are likely to recall her Garbo-esque role in Billy Wilder’s “Fedora” or in Nikita Mikhalkov’s Oscar-nommed “Dark Eyes.” But European audiences have seen her work without a pause since, most recently in Barbet Schroeder’s “Amnesia,” which bowed in Cannes, and earned the Swiss-born actress some of the best notices of her career. Variety first spotted Keller in the Michael Caine spy thriller “Funeral in Berlin” in 1966.

Funeral in Berlin” was a big Hollywood film. How was the experience?

I was so young, I literally didn’t know what I was doing there. I came in one day and saw a beautiful woman getting made up and dressed for my character, so I thought, “This is it. I’ve been fired. »

- Steven Gaydos

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New on Video: ‘Ninotchka’ one of the best films from Hollywood’s golden age

15 June 2015 8:41 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Ninotchka

Written by Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, Walter Reisch

Directed by Ernst Lubitsch

USA, 1939

It’s easy to see why Ninotchka works as well as it does, and why it’s one of the best films from Hollywood’s golden age and of arguably Hollywood’s greatest year. Just look at the talent involved. Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, and Walter Reisch were all seasoned writers, though with their best work admittedly still to come. Ernst Lubitsch had directed a number of excellent silent films in Germany, had hit the ground running once in Hollywood, making his first American film with no less a star than Mary Pickford (Rosita [1923]), and after a series of charming musical comedies, many with Maurice Chevalier, directed the more sublime and sophisticated comedies for which he now best known, films like Trouble in Paradise (1932) and Design for Living (1933). While this was happening, Greta Garbo was working »

- Jeremy Carr

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Remembering Christopher Lee

12 June 2015 7:11 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We bid a fond farewell to the wonderful Christopher Lee, and salute some of his best roles...

Christopher Lee crammed a dozen lives into one. His Special Forces work in the Second World War remains shrouded in mystery. We do know that, in 1944, he climbed Vesuvius three days before it erupted. A fine, operatic singer, he famously released a heavy metal album in his later 80s. A skilled fencer, he performed all his own sword fights and has been killed on screen more than any actor in cinematic history. As a child Lee briefly encountered Prince Felix Yusupov, murderer of Rasputin, a part Lee would later of course play. Ian Fleming was a cousin, Muhammed Ali a friend and once dedicated a victory to Lee. Fluent in five languages, passable in another four, people like Lee don’t really exist anymore. In truth they probably never did.

One could write a lengthy, »

- simonbrew

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David Edelstein on Christopher Lee: ‘The Last Living Horror Icon’

11 June 2015 11:27 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Christopher Lee — Sir Christopher in his final years — was the last living horror icon in the mode of Lon Chaney Sr., Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Vincent Price, and Lee’s frequent co-star, Peter Cushing, and it was an association with which he only reluctantly made his peace. His Count Dracula in the 1958 Horror of Dracula (British title: Dracula) remains an indelible portrait, alternately totemlike and bestial, with a penchant for nuzzling his buxom female victims before savagely sinking his fangs into their throats, and it made him an international star — but in the sorts of films he always longed to escape. In interviews, he took every opportunity to quote artists on his versatility, among them Billy Wilder (for whom he appeared as Mycroft in The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes) and his The Lord of the Rings antagonist Sir Ian McKellen, who reportedly said that Lee’s avoidance »

- David Edelstein

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Christopher Lee 1922-2015: BFI pays tribute to horror icon's "unforgettable legacy"

11 June 2015 10:08 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

The British Film Institute has paid tribute to the "unforgettable legacy" of movie icon Sir Christopher Lee.

The iconic Dracula star - who received a BFI Fellowship in 2013 - has passed away at the age of 93 in London after suffering heart failure.

Christopher Lee 1922-2015: 6 of the acting icon's greatest movie roles

Christopher Lee: 10 blistering tracks from his heavy metal career

The BFI is now joining Lee's fans, friends and co-stars the world over in paying tribute to the star, whose career stretched all the way back to the 1940s.

Amanda Nevill of the BFI said today (June 11): "Sir Christopher Lee, a BFI Fellow, was a distinctive and enduring presence in British and international cinema for almost 70 years. He leaves behind an unforgettable legacy of film and television performance.

"His contribution to cinema history spans such films as the definitive Dracula for Hammer Films through Billy Wilder »

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Christopher Lee 1922-2015: Iconic star's life and career in pictures

11 June 2015 6:35 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Sir Christopher Lee, one of the world's most celebrated actors, has died at the age of 93.

In a career spanning seven decades, Sir Christopher had over 280 screen credits in film and TV, and brought some of cinema's most iconic characters to life - Dracula, Saruman, Mycroft Holmes, Count Dooku, Frankenstein's monster, The Wicker Man's Lord Summerisle and James Bond villain Scaramanga, to name just a few.

Take a look back at some of his most memorable career moments below:

1940s: Career beginnings with Rank

Sir Christopher Lee started his film career in the late 1940s following service in the Raf during World War II.

After the war ended, he turned down his old job at pharmaceutical company Beechams to train at the Rank Organisation's Company of Youth - nicknamed the 'Rank Charm School'.

1957: The Curse of Frankenstein

He made his debut with gothic horror producers Hammer Films in The Curse of Frankenstein. »

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Christopher Lee dies aged 93

11 June 2015 5:49 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The veteran actor died on Sunday after being hospitalised for respiratory problems and heart failure.

Sir Christopher Lee has died, according to sources close to his family. He was 93.

The veteran actor died on Sunday (June 7) at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in London following respiratory problems and heart failure.

Lee had more than 280 film and television credits to his name but was best known for his role as Count Dracula in a string of popular Hammer Horror films, James Bond villain Scaramanga in The Man With The Golden Gun (1974) and more recently Saruman in The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit film trilogies. He also featured in the final two films of the Star Wars prequel trilogy.

The decision to release the news days after was based on his wife’s desire to inform family members first. The couple had been married for more than 50 years.

Lee still has one film yet to be released, fantasy »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Christopher Lee, Actor Who Made Dracula Count Again, Dies at 93

11 June 2015 5:09 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Christopher Lee, the second most famous Dracula of the 20th century — an impressive feat — and a memorably irrepressible villain in James Bond film “The Man With the Golden Gun,” in the Star Wars films and in “The Lord of the Rings” pics, has died. He was 93.

Lee appeared in 10 films as Count Dracula (nine if his uncredited role in the comedy “One More Time” is excluded).

His first role for famed British horror factory Hammer Films was not the Transylvanian vampire, however, but Frankenstein’s Monster in 1957’s “The Curse of Frankenstein.” His close friend Peter Cushing, with whom he would co-star in horror films frequently, starred as the Baron.

Lee made his first appearance as the sharp-toothed Count in 1958’s “Horror of Dracula.”

For reasons not quite certain, he skipped the 1960 sequel “Brides of Dracula,” but he returned to the role for 1965’s “Dracula: Prince of Darkness” — a movie »

- Carmel Dagan

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There Is a God in Celluloid Heaven! Entourage Flops at Box Office

8 June 2015 8:02 AM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

You could be vaccinating felines for a year at an animal shelter and still not hear the word "pussy" as much as you do in the first half hour of Entourage. This expansion of the HBO TV series appears to have been conceived by a gaggle of misogynistic, beer-chugging adolescent virgins who brag about getting laid, but the closest they've ever gotten is a Playboy centerfold bespattered with cream of mushroom soup that they rescued from the city dump.

To be fair, I have never viewed any episode of this series that I thought was supposed to be a tongue-in-cheek inside gander at Hollywood. Instead, what we have here is a glorified daydream of the male need to copulate with any orifice within five inches of his zipper. Make that four inches.

Directed and written with unflinching ineptitude and fetid taste by the series' executive producer Doug Ellin, the film is basically plotless. »

- Brandon Judell

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Watch First Eight Minutes of Cameron Crowe's 'Aloha'

29 May 2015 11:11 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Cameron Crowe's new film Aloha opens in theaters today, and to celebrate, Sony Pictures has offered up the first eight minutes of the Hawaii-set romantic-comedy on YouTube. The opening sequence (via Variety) sets up the film's love triangle between defense contractor Brian Gilcrest (actor Bradley Cooper), his Air Force liaison (Emma Stone) and his former lover (Rachel McAdams). The all-star cast also features Bill Murray, Danny McBride and John Krasinski and boasts a heavy subplot about the military-industrial complex.

Just minutes into the preview, Aloha also carries on Crowe's »

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Marilyn Monroe Facts: 25 Things You Don't Know About the Hollywood Icon

29 May 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Lifetime's mini-series "The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe" debuts on May 30, prompting the question: What possible secrets can there still be about Marilyn Monroe?

Quite a few, apparently, from the identity of her birth father, to the nature of her fatal overdose at age 36 -- was it suicide, accident, or murder? In 2012, on the 50th anniversary of her death, Moviefone previously published "25 Things You Didn't Know About Marilyn Monroe." Turns out that list barely scratched the surface. Here, then, are 25 more.

1. Monroe's birth certificate from 1926 lists her birth name as Norma Jeane Mortenson. The last name was a misspelling of the surname of her mother's second husband, Martin Mortensen, who separated from Gladys before she became pregnant. Soon after, she reverted to her first married name, Baker, and gave that name to her daughter.

2. Gladys later told Norma Jeane that her father was Gladys' boss, Charles Gifford, who looked like »

- Gary Susman

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Quentin Tarantino Spoils La Cinephiles with New Beverly's June Program

28 May 2015 7:30 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Quentin Tarantino's 35mm movie haven, now 37 this year, ditched digital last Fall when he took over programming. Despite skepticism of this celluloid model, Tarantino's $8 35mm double features work with La audiences. (Last month, I attended a near-packed screening of Atom Egoyan's "Exotica." Who knew?) New Beverly's June program looks delicious to any La movie maven. From Hitchcock to Godard, Bogdanovich to Billy Wilder, there's a lot to love here. Diehard "Kill Bill" fans can catch "Vol. 2" every Friday in June at midnight. It's hard to believe that film is already over 10 years old. Read More: Quentin Tarantino Enjoys Running the New Beverly, Even When He's Shooting a Movie Jean Becker's rare ménage à deux "Backfire," starring the ultimate cinema dream team of Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg, is a must-see for Nouvelle Vague completists. Preminger's "Anatomy of a Murder" looks dynamite on 35mm, and here »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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The Naked Gun's timeless buffoonery

26 May 2015 8:19 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We take a look back at 1988's The Naked Gun, its timeless brand of comedy, and Leslie Nielsen's superb performance...

Detective Frank Drebin's outside his Los Angeles police precinct, squeezing off shots into the receding backside of his own car.

How this came to happen almost defies description. Having driven his Ford Crown Victoria into a couple of bins outside the building, Drebin stumbles out, seemingly oblivious to the airbags going off inside. One airbag knocks the car into drive and off the vehicle goes, almost running Drebin over as it rumbles downhill.

As an orchestrated bit of comedy cinema, it's the knockabout equivalent of the famous scene in The Untouchables, where Brian De Palma expertly wrings every drop of suspense from a pram thudding down a flight of stairs at a train station.

On the spur of the moment, Drebin comes to the conclusion that there's a criminal »

- ryanlambie

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The Apu Trilogy

11 May 2015 3:20 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Pather PanchaliMy memories of Satyajit Ray's work before this year are blurred—they come up but they don't come out concretely developed. They aren't stenciled into the cohesive aesthetic dominating my attitude toward art. The first is gooey and, not surprisingly, Oscarized. His supporters in Hollywood knew of his terminal illness and in 1992 he was awarded a lifetime achievement Oscar, “in recognition of his rare mastery of the art of motion pictures, and of his profound humanitarian outlook, which has had an indelible influence on filmmakers and audiences throughout the world,” a few weeks before his death. Speaking from his deathbed, it was one of the first videotaped acceptance speeches. A diminished man, Ray cradled the glistening award, as the producers cut away from Ray’s words for two close-ups of the little golden man. Nevertheless, Ray came off witty when recounting writing to Ginger Rodgers and Billy Wilder »

- Greg Gerke

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 89 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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