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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 43 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


What's Streaming: Flawed But Still Very Very Funny

17 hours ago | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

With the slightest excuse, I can go on and on about how Some Like It Hot is truly the perfect comedy if not the perfect movie. Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond's script has a perfect symmetry -- every setup is paid off, every gag is repeated bigger, better and often with a kind of lyricism ("we have the same type blood, type O"). The timing of the maracas scene is breathtakingly brilliant. People like to gossip about director Wilder's difficulty in working with Marilyn Monroe but you see none of that onscreen. Most importantly, I've seen the movie countless times but it's still funny, every single time.

Recently I've been interested in -- and vastly entertained by -- comedies that aren't perfect, and that don't quite work for one reason or another. The thin, ridiculous plot is just an excuse for strings and strings of gags. You can see »

- Jette Kernion

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Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

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Off the Carpet: Unexpected virtue at the 87th Oscars

23 February 2015 1:51 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The fact is I think Alan Sepinwall's review said it perfectly, right there in the headline, really. The 87th Oscars was a memorable event despite itself. A number of touching speeches and human moments on the Dolby Theater stage mostly mitigated some tone deaf writing, late-night-level jokes and an overall flatly produced show that started off so promisingly with an inspired opening number. It was, within that, a rather fitting and organic end to an unusual film awards season. And of course it ended on a note of PC outrage. Who would expect less in this day and age? A number of socio-political statements were made by the evening's winners and none of them rang a false note. It was like the sincerity of significance was clawing past the show's need to go viral or something (thematically interesting to me given what's being studied in the Best Picture victor). Common »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Oscars poll: Who gave the best acceptance speech?

22 February 2015 10:02 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

If you thought some of this year’s Oscar races were tough to decide, now we are asking you to choose who gave the best speech at this year’s telecast. And it is a tough task as there were some colossal ones.  Vote in our poll below and sound off in the comments section at the bottom of the post if your favorite is missing so we can add it.  -Break- Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu: Best Director ("Birdman") The big winner of the night, may also have had the best speech, if not the funniest, when he picked up the helming prize: “Good luck charms work because at the DGA Awards I was wearing a Raymond Carver shirt, Billy Wilder tie, and I won. But tonight I am wearing the real Michael Keaton tighty-whities. They are tight but it work. I’m here. Thank you Michael.” Patricia Arquette: Best »

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Oscars poll: Who gave the best speech?

22 February 2015 10:02 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

If you thought some of this year’s Oscar races were tough to decide, now we are asking you to choose who gave the best speech at this year’s telecast. And it is a tough task as there were some colossal ones.  Vote in our poll below and sound off in the comments section at the bottom of the post if your favorite is missing so we can add it.  -Break- Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu: Best Director ("Birdman") The big winner of the night, may also have had the best speech, if not the funniest, when he picked up the helming prize: “Good luck charms work because at the DGA Awards I was wearing a Raymond Carver shirt, Billy Wilder tie, and I won. But tonight I am wearing the real Michael Keaton tighty-whities. They are tight but it work. I’m here. Thank you Michael.” Patricia Arquette: Best »

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John Boorman on ‘Queen and Country,’ Retirement and Why ‘Boyhood’ Disappointed Him

20 February 2015 3:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

John Boorman mined his childhood memories to great acclaim in 1987’s “Hope and Glory,” which mixed humor and pathos in a story about coming of age during The Blitz.

He returns to his personal history once more with “Queen and Country,” a sequel of sorts and a reflection on his years spent as a draftee in the armed services teaching recruits how to type before they were shipped off to Korea. The picture is sort of a lyrical “No Time for Sergeants,” as Boorman’s alter-ego, re-christened Bill Rohan and played by Callum Turner, finds himself at odds with army brass, gets into mischief with his best mate by stealing the regimental clock, and must defend himself from a charge of “seducing an officer from his duty” for airing his grievances about British foreign policy.

“Queen and Country” opens in limited release on Friday. The 82-year-old Boorman, whose list of »

- Brent Lang

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Watch: 66-Minute Compilation Of Saul Bass' Famous Movie Title Sequences From Preminger To Scorsese

19 February 2015 10:05 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Talk about a legacy. Acclaimed titles designer Saul Bass worked with some of Hollywood’s most legendary directors during his 40-plus year career, and on some of their best pictures. His first title credit was on Otto Preminger’s 1954 “Carmen Jones.” From there, Bass went on to collaborate on over 60 films, many of which have become much deserved cinema classics. In this hour-long compilation, YouTube user FlaneurSolitaire pieces together scores of Bass’ revered title sequences in chronological order, starting with “The Man with the Golden Arm” (also directed by Preminger), from 1955. (Bass’ credits from that year alone also include Robert Aldrich’s “The Big Knife,” “The Shrike” helmed by José Ferrer, Billy Wilder’s “The Seven Year Itch,” and “The Racers,” which starred Kirk Douglas and was directed by Henry Hathaway.) “The Racers” wasn’t the only Kirk Douglas film Bass did the titles for; he also designed them for »

- Zach Hollwedel

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Daily | Goings On | La Cava, Jarmusch, Benning

16 February 2015 1:16 PM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

For our roundup of current goings on, we begin in New York, where you can see Ginger Rogers, Katharine Hepburn, Eve Arden and Lucille Ball in Gregory La Cava’s Stage Door (1937), surveys of the careers of John Carpenter, Lynn Hershman Leeson and John Boorman, a car company promo by Nagisa Oshima, Jim Jarmusch riffing on Man Ray and documentaries by Wang Bing and Lav Diaz at MoMA. Plus: Billy Wilder in Berkeley, Lewis Klahr in San Francisco, James Benning in Hamburg, Noël Burch in Brussels and more. » - David Hudson »

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Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

15 February 2015 12:30 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Louis Jourdan, Star of ‘Octopussy,’ ‘Gigi,’ Dies at 93

15 February 2015 12:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Louis Jourdan, who crafted a Hollywood acting career in the footsteps of fellow dapper Frenchmen Maurice Chevalier and Charles Boyer and is best remembered for the musical “Gigi” and as the villain in James Bond pic “Octopussy,” has died at 93. According to his friend and biographer Olivier Minne, he died Saturday at his home in Beverly Hills.

Jourdan offered a certain effortless charm that worked equally well in light heroic roles and more sinister ones.

“He was the last French figure of the Hollywood golden age. And he worked with so many of the greatest actors and directors,” said Minne, who is working on a documentary and a book about Jourdan.

In Vincente Minnelli’s 1958 musical confection “Gigi,” Jourdan starred with Leslie Caron and Chevalier in an effort from the “My Fair Lady” team of Lerner & Loewe, turning the Collette tale into a Frenchified version of “Pygmalion.” The New York Times said, »

- Carmel Dagan

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From 'The Thin Man' to 'Dogfight': A broken-hearted Valentine's playlist

14 February 2015 11:30 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It has not been an easy week. At the start of the week, we had our editorial meeting here at HitFix, as we do every Monday, to talk about both the week ahead and longer-term projects as well. For fairly obvious reasons, there was a fair amount of talk about Valentine's Day content, and I mentioned a few different ideas that I might write about, including one that I'll end up publishing at some point about Steve Martin. But even as I pitched a few ideas, I found myself uncomfortable with the entire idea of writing about romantic films right now. Honestly, I was hoping to spend this week with my head down and then just sail right through this weekend without writing about love at all, because for the first time in my adult life, I am no longer sure what I think about it. After all, I was with my wife for 14 years. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Newsmakers and Media Shakers: Top Ten Reporters in the Movies

14 February 2015 6:45 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

For the sake of this particular movie column let’s just consider the media types of news personalities, journalists and reporters as interchangeable. With that in mind Newsmakers and Media Shakers: Top Ten Reporters in the Movies will look at some of cinema’s top inquirers in the name of getting down to the nitty-gritty in bringing the truth to the forefront.

The movies have intensely, if not sometimes comically, showcased those characters that felt justified in reporting their newsworthy findings in the name of riveting entertainment. Whether spotlighting real-life newsmaker and shakers such as legendary luminaries in Edward R. Murrow to Watergate busters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein or profiling parodies of probing journalists as Natural Born Killer’s Wayne Gale it has been a trippy ride in witnessing cinematic reporters and their excitable exploits.

Perhaps Newmakers and Media Shakers: Top Ten Reporters in the Movies will be irresponsibly »

- Frank Ochieng

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From Kubrick to Marilyn Monroe, Oscar Has a Stellar List of Shut-Outs

13 February 2015 4:54 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are 195 individuals nominated for Oscar this year. And when the winners are named Feb. 22, they will become part of film history, joining such greats as Billy Wilder, Ingrid Bergman, Ben Hecht and Walt Disney.

But 80% of the contenders will go home empty-handed. However, there is good news: They are in good company as well.

Here is a sampling of nominees that didn’t win: “Citizen Kane,” “Chinatown” and “Star Wars”; directors Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, Stanley Kubrick and Ingmar Bergman; writers Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, Graham Greene, Harold Pinter and David Mamet; actors Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Blvd.”; Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”; and Peter O’Toole in “Lawrence of Arabia.”

They managed to do Ok, though.

It’s hard to say why they didn’t win. Sometimes tastes change. Sometimes there’s too much competition in one year. Frank Capra’s 1939 “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington »

- Tim Gray

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The 25 Best Romantic Comedies Since When Harry Met Sally

11 February 2015 8:35 AM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

This article was originally published in February 2014. We are rerunning it with Valentine's Day coming up. Twenty-five years ago, When Harry Met Sally revolutionized the romantic comedy. Sure, this film genre had been around since the earliest days of cinema, and had once been the domain of giants like Billy Wilder and Ernst Lubitsch and Stanley Donen. But Rob Reiner and Nora Ephron’s 1989 hit, with its slick, highly quotable back-and-forth between Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan, as well as its oddly self-reflective quality, felt like something strange and new — the Star Wars of romantic comedies. It wasn’t just a romantic comedy, it was a rom-com. We’ve been living in its wake ever since, and Valentine's Day seemed like a good time to look at the 25 intervening years and pick our favorites.A couple of caveats: We focused only on American and British rom-coms. In part, this was »

- Bilge Ebiri,David Edelstein

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Non-American Born Best Director Oscar Winners

11 February 2015 7:24 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

With the DGA Award in hand, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu has become a frontrunner in the best director Oscar race for Birdman.

Only seven winners of the DGA Award have not won the best director Oscar in the 66 years that the Directors Guild of America has given the award. The most recent case was two years ago, when Ben Affleck wasn’t even nominated for the best director Oscar for Argo, which won best picture.

No American has won for best director since 2011 and if Inarritu, who is from Mexico, takes the Oscar this year, the trend will continue. Inarritu could become the second Latin American director to win for best director, following Alfonso Cuaron’s win last year.

In the 86 years since the Academy Awards’ inception, 89 Oscars have been given for best director. Twenty-six awards (29 percent) went to non-American born directors.

At the first annual »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Brackett and Wilder Screenwriting Efforts: From Garbo to Swanson

10 February 2015 11:45 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies (See previous post: "The Charles Brackett Diaries: Billy Wilder and Hollywood in the '30s and '40s.") Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, and One, Two, Three. However well-received, Wilder's later films generally lacked the sophistication and subtlety found in his earlier work with Brackett. Charles Brackett, for his part, became associated with 20th Century-Fox, working as a producer-screenwriter. His Fox films, though frequently popular and at times applauded by critics, were decidedly made-to-order, »

- Andre Soares

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Interview with Author Slide: Was There a 'Sunset Blvd.' Auteur?

10 February 2015 11:44 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Billy Wilder screenwriter-producer partner Charles Brackett remembered: Q&A with film historian Anthony Slide (photo: Charles Brackett ca. early 1940s) Six-time Academy Award winner Billy Wilder is a film legend. He's renowned for classics such as The Major and the Minor, Sunset Blvd., Some Like It Hot, and The Apartment. The fact that Wilder was not the sole creator of these movies is all but irrelevant to graduates from the Auteur School of Film History. Wilder directed, co-wrote, and at times produced his films. That should suffice. For auteurists, perhaps. But not for those interested in film history facts. That's why the Charles Brackett diaries offer such a refreshing glimpse into his and Billy Wilder's moviemaking process. Now, Charles who? Oscar winner Charles Brackett Charles Brackett (1892-1969) just happens to be the – largely forgotten – guy who co-created with Billy Wilder (and, at times, with a third screenwriting partner) classics »

- Andre Soares

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Berlin: Telefonica Studios, Film Factory Board Alex De la Iglesia’s ‘My Big Night’ (Exclusive)

5 February 2015 10:48 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

At a Berlin festival boasting a record-high 60-plus Latin American features in different sections, Telefonica Studios, the Spanish telco giant’s film/TV production arm, and Film Factory, a preeminent Spanish sales company, have boarded one of the highest-profile productions from the Spanish-speaking world: “My Big Night,” the next big comedy from Alex de la Iglesia (“Witching & Bitching”).

Telefonica Studios has taken substantial minority equity on “My Big Night”; Vicente Canales’ Film Factory introduces the title, produced by Enrique Cerezo, at Berlin.

Pic stars Spanish crooner Raphael, and goes into production on Feb. 23, aiming for a fall fest berth.

Co-written with Jorge Guerricaechevarria, De la Iglesia’s career-long co-scribe, “My Big Night” unspools at a lavish New Year’s Eve TV show, where the frenzied fake bonhomie contrasts with the shoot date – a sweltering mid-August – the participants’ actions and sentiments, and the solitude of the studio’s setting. Raphael plays a sadistic, »

- John Hopewell

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Remembering Actress Simon Part 2 - Deadly Sex Kitten Romanced Real-Life James Bond 'Inspiration'

5 February 2015 7:53 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine' 1938: Jean Renoir's film noir (photo: Jean Gabin and Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine') (See previous post: "'Cat People' 1942 Actress Simone Simon Remembered.") In the late 1930s, with her Hollywood career stalled while facing competition at 20th Century-Fox from another French import, Annabella (later Tyrone Power's wife), Simone Simon returned to France. Once there, she reestablished herself as an actress to be reckoned with in Jean Renoir's La Bête Humaine. An updated version of Émile Zola's 1890 novel, La Bête Humaine is enveloped in a dark, brooding atmosphere not uncommon in pre-World War II French films. Known for their "poetic realism," examples from that era include Renoir's own The Lower Depths (1936), Julien Duvivier's La Belle Équipe (1936) and Pépé le Moko (1937), and particularly Marcel Carné's Port of Shadows (1938) and Daybreak (1939).[11] This thematic and »

- Andre Soares

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Second City’s Big February and Other L.A. Events

5 February 2015 1:57 PM, PST | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Second City Hollywood is blowing up (in a good way) in February and wants its students, alumni, teachers and actors interested in the improv training school to get involved. For starters, there’s a Q&A with Tim Kazurinsky, Chandra lee Schwartz, Kim Zimmer and Tom Flynn from the touring company of “Wicked” Feb. 9 starting at 5 p.m. Then on Feb. 11, Jen Candy, daughter of legendary Second City alum John Candy, will interview Jim Belushi at 8 p.m. and on Feb. 25, she’ll sit down with her late father’s co-star from “Armed and DangerousEugene Levy. All events take place at the school’s theater located at 6560 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles.   Other upcoming events include:  The Greatest Showman: Cecil B. DeMille Screening of “The Cheat” & “The Golden Chance”Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m.Billy Wilder Theater10899 Wilshire Blvd.Tickets here.  Learn How to Use the Arri Alexa & Amira CamerasFeb. »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 43 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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