IMDb > Billy Wilder > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 119 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Telluride unveils line-up packed with awards contenders

15 hours ago | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Main programme includes Birdman, Foxcatcher, The Imitation Game and Rosewater.

The Telluride Film Festival (Aug 29 - Sept 1) has revealed the line-up for its 41st edition, packed with films tipped for awards season.

The festival will include 85 features, short films and revivals representing 28 countries, along with special artist tributes, conversations, panels and education programmes.

The main programme includes Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman, starring Michael Keaton, which opened the Venice Film Festival to rave reviews yesterday.

The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, The Homesman, directed by Tommy Lee Jones, and Jon Stewart’s directorial debut Rosewater are all generating awards buzz.

There are also several titles that picked up prizes in Cannes earlier this year including Foxcatcher, which won Bennett Miller best director; Russian drama Leviathan, winner of best screenplay; Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner, which saw Timothy Spall win best actor; and jury prize winner Mommy from Xavier Dolan.

The 50 Year Argument (d. Martin Scorsese, [link »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

Permalink | Report a problem


Telluride Film Festival Unveils Eclectic Lineup Including ‘Imitation Game,’ ‘Rosewater,’ ‘Wild’

21 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mixing high-profile star power with offbeat titles, the 41st Telluride Film Festival is offering an impressive glimpse at an array of awards contenders over Labor Day weekend.

The four-day fest, which starts Friday with a tribute to Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now,” includes the first showings of Reese Witherspoon’s “Wild,” Benedict Cumberbatch’s “The Imitation Game,” Jon Stewart’s “Rosewater” and Mia Wasikowska’s “Madame Bovary” — the 10th film adaptation of the French novel.

The Venice Film Festival opener “Birdman,” which has vaulted Michael Keaton into awards contention, will also screen at Telluride. Ramin Bahrani’s housing crisis drama “99 Homes” is screening at both festivals as is Joshua Oppenheimer’s documentary “The Look of Silence.”

Several Cannes titles are coming to Telluride: Mike Leigh’s “Mr. Turner,” Bennett Miller’s “Foxcatcher,” Xavier Dolan’s “Mommy,” the Dardenne Brothers’ workplace drama “Two Days, One Night,” Andrei Zvyagintsev’s “Leviathan »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


'Birdman,' 'Wild,' 'Imitation Game' and an 'Apocalypse Now' treat set for 41st Telluride

21 hours ago | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Telluride — With all the reindeer games going on in the fall festival world, a lot of the drama and mystery surrounding Telluride's perennially on-the-lowdown program began to seep out like a steadily deflating balloon this year. Toronto, Venice and New York notations of "World Premiere," "Canada Premiere," "New York Premiere" or "International Premiere" and the like made it all rather obvious which films were heading to the San Juans for the 41st edition of the tiny mining village's cinephile gathering, and which were not. But the fact is, if you're in it just for the surprises — or certainly, for the awards-baiting heavies — you're never going to be fully satisfied by the Telluride experience. That having been said, this year's program might just be the most exciting one in my six years of attending. Starting with all of the stuff we were expecting, indeed, Cannes players "Foxcatcher," "Mr. Turner" and "Leviathan »

- Kristopher Tapley

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘Night Will Fall’

27 August 2014 11:58 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As the WWII tide turned in their direction in 1944-45, the Allied forces had more than military liberation on their minds: They wanted to win the propaganda war as well, to forever discredit Nazism in Germany and around the world. Commissioned by the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force, shot by combat and newsreel cameramen accompanying troops as they liberated occupied Europe, and supervised by a remarkable team, the film “German Concentration Camps Factual Survey” was intended to be their weapon. But politics prevented the pic’s completion and distribution, as recounted in British helmer Andre Singer’s powerful, must-see documentary “Night Must Fall,” which chronicles the untold story of the film’s history. 

Providing important context, “Night Will Fall” is premiering in conjunction with the release of the restored “German Concentration Camps Factual Survey,” which arrives 70 years after its inception, and after four years of labor by Britain’s Imperial War Museums. »

- Alissa Simon

Permalink | Report a problem


Throwback Thursday: Von Stroheim!

27 August 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

Erich von Stroheim was one-of-a-kind: a serious filmmaker who also became a distinctive, and indelible, screen personality. He’s probably best known today for his role as Gloria Swanson’s faithful servant in Billy Wilder’s 'Sunset Blvd.' While learning about directing as an assistant to D.W. Griffith in the teens, he established himself as a stereotyped “evil Hun” in World War One movies. Universal’s Carl Laemmle gave him a chance to realize his own vision on screen in 'Blind Husbands' (1919) and launched his star-crossed career as a writer-director. Laemmle may have complained about the enormous cost of the lavish 'Foolish Wives' (1922), with its eye-popping Monte Carlo set, but he used...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] »

- Leonard Maltin

Permalink | Report a problem


Garry Marshall's Play 'Billy & Ray' to Star Vincent Kartheiser

27 August 2014 10:35 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Vincent Kartheiser is heading to the stage. The Mad Men actor will star in the off-Broadway run of Billy & Ray, a comedy directed by Garry Marshall that charts the birth of the film noir genre, it has been announced by the Vineyard Theatre's artistic directors, Douglas Aibel and Sarah Stern. He will play writer-director Billy Wilder opposite Larry Pine (Casa Valentina) as novelist Raymond Chandler. The New York premiere run of the production will begin previews on Oct. 1 at the Vineyard Theatre, and officially open Oct. 20. Penned by Mike Bencivenga, Billy & Ray follows the literary odd couple as

read more

»

- Ashley Lee

Permalink | Report a problem


'Mad Men' star Vincent Kartheiser to play Billy Wilder on stage

26 August 2014 2:40 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Mad Men’s Vincent Kartheiser is joining Larry Pine on stage in Mike Bencivenga’s new play, Billy & Ray.

In Billy & Ray—which will get its New York premiere this fall at the Vineyard Theatre—Kartheiser will play Billy Wilder alongside Pine’s Raymond Chandler, as Wilder and Chandler work together to adapt the novel Double Indemnity for the big screen.

The Off-Broadway comedy, directed by Garry Marshall, is set in 1940s Hollywood and tells the story of the birth of the film noir genre. Rounding out the cast is Sophie von Haselberg, who will play Wilder’s secretary, and »

- Samantha Highfill

Permalink | Report a problem


Hollywood Exiles in Europe: "Christ in Concrete"

25 August 2014 8:37 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Hollywood Exiles in Europe is a screening series co-curated by author Rebecca Prime and the UCLA Film and Television Archive.

Following a recent presentation of Christ in Concrete (1949) at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater, Norma Barzman, wife of the film's late screenwriter Ben Barzman, stated “it was the hope of her husband as well as director Edward Dmytryk that Christ in Concrete would at least explain the motivations of the Hollywood Ten and at best absolve them.”

Production for the film took placed in London during Dmytryk and Barzman's self-imposed exile in Europe following their blacklisting by the United States Congress's House Un-American Activities Committee. When Christ in Concrete (later re-titled Give Us This Day and eventually Salt to the Devil) arrived in American theaters it did so quietly, playing to regional crowds in New York before its hasty exit into a relative obscurity—at least as far as domestic audiences were concerned. »

- Daniel Watkins

Permalink | Report a problem


Movies This Week: August 22-28, 2014

22 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

 

The Austin Film Society teams up with aGLIFF tonight to bring the new documentary To Be Takei (my review for Paste) to the Marchesa for a one-off screening. It's a touching and genuinely funny profile of George Takei, whose career has taken him from Star Trek to social media icon and gay rights activist. This month's Roger Corman series continues this weekend with X: The Man With The X-Ray Eyes. This 1963 thriller screens tonight and again on Sunday in a 35mm print. On Wednesday night, Afs presents SXSW doc Big Joy: The Adventures of James Broughton (Don's review) and then the Barbara Stanwyck Essential Cinema series will close Thursday with Ball Of Fire. Screening in 35mm, this classic 1941 Howard Hawks comedy, written by Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett, pairs Stanwyck with Gary Cooper.

Over at the Alamo Drafthouse Ritz, The Complete David Lynch series is winding down but has several more gems on the way. »

- Matt Shiverdecker

Permalink | Report a problem


Sin City and the eternal, seductive allure of film noir

21 August 2014 1:53 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The release of Sin City: A Dame To Kill For inspires James to look back at its film noir roots, and some classic examples of the genre...

"Things go dark. I don't mind much. It's okay." John Hartigan, Sin City.

We're at the shadowy back-end of the summer blockbuster season and darkness is entering the frame. Here comes ultraviolence, sleaze, crime and death, all beautifully shot in macabre high-contrast monochrome. Just when you thought you'd got yourself clean and were all peppy after some upbeat family-friendly popcorn thrills, here's Sin City: A Dame To Kill For to darken up the doorways. (And it will light up a cigarette in those doorways and spit out some tough dialogue from between its bloodstained teeth while it's lingering there.)

We're back in the Basin City of Frank Miller's graphic novels again, once more brought to vivid screen life by the comics creator »

- ryanlambie

Permalink | Report a problem


“I don’t feel the need to do superhero films at the moment…” HeyUGuys talks to Richard Ayoade

8 August 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

You know the hair. The glasses. The voice. The sheer talent. Richard Ayoade spoke to HeyUGuys about The Double, which is out now on DVD and Blu Ray. Other subjects included The It Crowd, a new book, Ingmar Bergman, and trying not to bore audiences.

I’d like to start by going back a little bit to your first feature, which was obviously Submarine. I think for many people, they didn’t realise that a comedy actor was also going to be a great director. So I was wondering, did you feel that was a liberating experience?

Erm, I don’t know. I’d directed TV before – I directed a show called Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace, and music videos and things, so the main thing at the time [was  I] felt the writing of something that was much longer than anything I’d done, and the structure of doing a film that has ninety minutes to it. »

- Gary Green

Permalink | Report a problem


TCM Offers Controversial (and Legendary) Actress Fonda Film Marathon Today

1 August 2014 7:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Jane Fonda movies on TCM: ‘The China Syndrome,’ ‘Klute,’ and Jean-Luc Godard drama ‘Tout Va Bien’ among highlights (photo: Jane Fonda in ‘Klute’) Turner Classic Movies’ 2014 "Summer Under the Stars" kicked off earlier today, August 1, with a day-long series of Jane Fonda movies. Still reviled by American right-wingers because of her 1972 trip to North Vietnam while the United States was at war with that country — she was photographed seated on an anti-aircraft battery — but admired by others for her liberal views, anti-war activism, and human rights advocacy, the two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner has enjoyed a highly eclectic film career, eventually becoming a rarity among rarities: Jane Fonda is the child of a film star (Henry Fonda) who not only became a film star in her own right, but who went on to become an even bigger screen legend than her famous parent. (See also: Jane Fonda “Summer Under »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Throwback Thursday: Ginger Rogers, Billy Wilder And Superman

30 July 2014 9:06 PM, PDT | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

The 1942 comedy The Major and the Minor is notable today as the Hollywood directing debut of Billy Wilder, who wrote the film with his longtime partner Charles Brackett. They would go on to make such classics as The Lost Weekend and Sunset Blvd., but in 1942 Wilder’s name wasn’t a selling point: it was all about Ginger and, to a lesser degree, leading man Ray Milland. In its first-run engagement at the two Paramount Theatres in L.A., the downtown branch added a second feature from B-movie specialists William Pine and William Thomas (known as the Two Dollar Bills), while both venues featured—and advertised—the latest of Paramount’s Superman cartoons, a testament to the appeal of...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] »

- Leonard Maltin

Permalink | Report a problem


The ‘Magic’ Is Gone: The Lazy Nihilism of Woody Allen

30 July 2014 2:03 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

(Note: This piece reveals details about the ending of “Magic in the Moonlight.”)

Amid this unusually busy season for faith-based cinema — or whatever we should call 2014’s bumper crop of Christian-themed and/or spiritually inclined movies, from “Son of God,” “Noah,” “God’s Not Dead” and “I Origins” to the still-forthcoming “Left Behind” and “Exodus: Gods and Kings” — the arrival of one of the year’s more prominent anti-faith movies should not go unnoticed. I’m talking about “Magic in the Moonlight,” the latest sun-drenched romantic travelogue from that fitful cinematic genius and self-styled nihilist philosopher, Woody Allen.

Fittingly enough for a story about professional magicians and wily con artists, the film unfolds against the French Riviera in 1928, a setting ripe with all manner of enchanting and seductive possibilities. But don’t let that title fool you: Earnest as it may sound, it actually begs to be read sarcastically. Allen »

- Justin Chang

Permalink | Report a problem


Cabin Fever: Patient Zero - Five Fast Questions for Director Kaare Andrews

30 July 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

When Cabin Fever came out in 2002, it was a sensation among fans of freaky frights. The film packed more than a little punch with its own version of the karate kid, a leg shaving scene that set disposable razor sales back for a year, and a German Shepherd who made Cujo look like a lapdog.

Eli Roth’s Cabin Fever left a legacy hard to live up to, but of course a dumbed-down sequel was released. It was directed by Roth’s Bff Ti West, but one would never guess that after the studio heads got hold of it in the editing room and butchered it.

Regardless, the Cabin Fever name still carries weight so there is a prequel that's out now on demand and will be in theaters on August 1, 2014.

This time the story centers about the initial outbreak of the creeping virus. On a remote island, Patient Zero »

- Staci Layne Wilson

Permalink | Report a problem


In From the Cold: Shane Weisfeld talks about Freezer

30 July 2014 1:47 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Trevor Hogg chats with Shane Weisfeld about The Karate Kid, perseverance, and developing a cool idea into a movie…

“I was born in 1974 so I was able to be influenced by the birth of the blockbuster, and then the birth of renting movies,” states Shane Weisfeld who watched the classics of the 1970s on VHS tapes.  “I first saw The Exorcist [1973] when I was in Grade 10 and that had a strong, lasting impression on me, and to this day remains my favourite film. In my last year of high school I did a project on The Karate Kid [1984], where I first learned about the script-to-screen process and the collaboration involved in making a film. The screenwriter of The Karate Kid [Robert Mark Kamen] went on to write films like Lethal Weapon 3 [1992], The Transporter [2002], Taken [2008] and Colombiana [2011]; he is a great writer, and longevity is a precious thing in this crazy business, as »

- Trevor Hogg

Permalink | Report a problem


Double Indemnity Returns to the Big Screen at Film Forum

29 July 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

The spiffy, suave James M. Cainbased mega-noir that spawned a billion scheming-bitch thrillers, this expert night of the Hollywood soul is such a genre axiom it practically scans like a mid-'40s shopper's catalogue for noiristes: fedoras; venetian blinds; cigarettes; leaking bullet wound; treacherous blonde; serious-as-cancer slang banter; dumb, doomed men everywhere you turn.

Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray become unforgettable, delicious clichés the minute they cock their eyebrows at one another in and around Billy Wilder's shadowy L.A. interiors. But this film was also the moment, as the war still raged, when noir had its first real stiffy, basking in the cold-blooded algebra of two amoral bastards plotting the death of an innocent jerk — and as we all watch »

Permalink | Report a problem


“Annie Hall”: The Top 25 (Best Picture)

28 July 2014 6:09 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

All good things must come to an end at some point. Yes folks, this is the final installment of this series of mine, and as such, it’s (hopefully) a bit of a doozy…the Best Picture field. Without a doubt, this is the big one, so it’s the one where the list will be the most important and I hope interesting to look at as well. Obviously, I could go on and on in preparation right now, waxing poetic and teasing, but at this point I know how the game works here for everyone. You all just want to see the lists that I do anyhow, so I have no problem obliging you good people there in that particular regard one more time. All you have to do is just be patient over the next paragraph or so and you’ll get the goods front and center for your reading pleasure… »

- Joey Magidson

Permalink | Report a problem


The Real Man with Kaleidoscope Eyes

26 July 2014 3:28 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Roger Corman sat down with Conan O’Brien last week for a spirited interview (promoting his latest Sy-Fy spectacular, Sharktopus Vs. Pteracuda) turning in a charismatic performance that provoked a reaction not unlike Dennis Hopper’s besotted appraisal of Dean Stockwell’s spaced-out lounge lizard in Blue Velvet:

“Suave? Goddamn, you are one suave fucker”.

Suave? Yep, that’s Roger.

O’Brien’s wide-ranging conversation with Corman proved that this storied filmmaker is nothing if not a treasure trove of great Hollywood tales, mainly because Roger himself has instigated so many of them. Not the least being the time he decided to drop acid to better direct The Trip, his 1967 psychedelic-psychodrama starring Peter Fonda and, appropriately enough, Dennis Hopper.

As Roger hauled out the anecdote about his blissful LSD experience for Conan, I had a flashback of my own… to that weekend many moons ago when Tim Lucas, editor of Video Watchdog, »

- Charlie Largent

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie Review – Some Like It Hot (1959)

24 July 2014 1:27 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Some Like It Hot, 1959.

Directed by Billy Wilder.

Starring Jack Lemmon, Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and George Raft.

Synopsis:

After witnessing a murder, two musicians flee Chicago to join an all-female band on their way to Florida…

Some Like It Hot is not known for its mob ties. Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis, carrying their awkwardly-shaped bass-case and sax-box, dressed in drag, is the memorable image. It would be easy to watch the opening first ten minutes and not even realise what the film is as we see gangsters with tommy-guns, shoot through a hearse revealing the liquor inside. Remember the funeral parlour that doubles as a speakeasy with the appropriate knock? Or the dancing girls and jazz music that echoes out onto the street while drinkers order their “coffee”? Oh, and then the camera subtly moves to introduce Gerald (Lemmon) and Joe (Curtis). They look bored playing their up-beat music. »

- Simon Columb

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 119 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners