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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 101 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Billy Bob Thornton: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

24 July 2015 5:11 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

I sat down with Oscar-winning screenwriter, actor, director and musician Billy Bob Thornton for Venice Magazine in October of 2001. He had a slate of very diverse projects he was promoting: his first solo music album, "Private Radio," as well as the films "Monster's Ball," "Bandits," and "The Man Who Wasn't There." My strongest memory is of Thornton's quiet intensity and an undercurrent of Southern affability, which came out once he decided you were okay. He seemed to feel that way about me after I shared with him my idolatry of legendary filmmaker Fred Zinnemann, something we shared. I also remember his unusual diet, when our lunch was served. Thornton got the biggest plate of sliced papaya I've seen to date, artfully presented. I got a seafood salad. He looked at my plate, smiled, and told me about the horrible shellfish allergy he'd been saddled with all his life, and how »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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BBC Culture curates 100 best American films, courtesy of 62 international film critics

22 July 2015 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BBC Culture has this week unveiled a new list of the top 100 American films, as voted for by a pool of international film critics from across the globe. The format of the poll was that any film that would make the list had to have recieved funding from a Us source, and the directors of the films did not need to be from the USA, nor did the films voted for need to be filmed in the Us.

Critics were asked to submit their top 10 lists, which would try to find the top 100 American films that while “not necessarily the most important, but the greatest on an emotional level”. The list, as you may have guessed, is very different to the lists curated by say the BFI or AFI over the years, so there are certainly a few surprises on here, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), Terrence Malick »

- Scott J. Davis

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Scratching our heads at the BBC's top 100 American Movies of All-Time

21 July 2015 5:07 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

First off, let's make one thing clear.  We're not scratching our heads at Spike Lee's "Do The Right Thing" making the BBC's 100 greatest American films.  That movie, of which an image accompanies this post, not only made the list, but ranked appropriately at no. 25.  It's the rest of the selections that have us scratching and, yes, shaking our heads in disbelief. A wonderful page view driver, these sorts of lists make great fodder for passionate movie fans no matter what their age or part of the world they hail from.  There is nothing more entertaining than watching two critics from opposite ends of the globe try to debate whether "The Dark Knight" should have been nominated for best picture or make a list like this.  Even in this age of short form content where Vines, Shapchats and Instagram videos have captured viewers attention, movies will continue to inspire because »

- Gregory Ellwood

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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'Citizen Kane' Still the Best American Movie Ever, According to BBC Critics Poll

21 July 2015 8:46 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The BBC has published an exhaustive, and somewhat exhausting, list of the 100 Greatest American Films ever, according to 62 film critics. Unlike the most recent Sight & Sound poll, which named "Vertigo" the greatest movie of all time, "Citizen Kane" reigns again here, leading a top ten that includes "The Godfather," "Vertigo," "2001" and "The Searchers." The newest film on the list are Malick's "Tree of Life," McQueen's "12 Years a Slave," Nolan's "The Dark Knight," Gondry's "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" and, natch, Lynch's "Mulholland Drive." Kubrick is well-represented, including a surprisingly high-placing "Barry Lyndon," as are Steven Spielberg, Billy Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock, who has moved freely between Brit and American lists. Read More: The Best Films of 2015 So Far Some of the more idiosyncratic choices include "Heaven's Gate," »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Daily | Rivers, Kubrick, Tsai

21 July 2015 5:05 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup: A Ben Rivers installation in London and a Tsai Ming-liang exhibition in China. Revisiting Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange and The Shining. Adrian Martin on mise en scène. Plus articles on Jean-Luc Godard, Catherine Breillat, Billy Wilder, Errol Morris, Takashi Murakami, Guy Maddin, Penelope Spheeris, Kris Swanberg and Josephine Decker. And word on Kanye West and Steve McQueen's video, Oleg Sentsov's trial and Cate Blanchett's television series. And we remember Alex Rocco and George Coe. » - David Hudson »

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Samba in New York by Anne-Katrin Titze

18 July 2015 4:44 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano's Samba, stars Omar Sy, Tahar Rahim (Grand Central) and Charlotte Gainsbourg Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At The Paris Theatre, the greats of the past - Ernst Lubitsch, Billy Wilder, Charlie Chaplin and Frank Capra - and Italy's recent past - Dino Risi, Ettore Scola and Mario Monicelli - blended with Ken Loach, Michel Gondry and Woody Allen as Samba co-director Olivier Nakache and Omar Sy spoke with me on the red carpet. Sy also starred in Nakache and Eric Toledano's The Intouchables. Omar Sy will soon be seen in John Wells' (of August: Osage County fame) Adam Jones with Bradley Cooper and Alicia Vikander and is filming Ron Howard's Inferno with Tom Hanks, Ben Foster and Felicity Jones.

Samba co-director Olivier Nakache: "We like to discover something about society, but with humor." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Omar's wife, Hélène Sy, was joined by guests Michael Avedon, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Slfs Interview: Tony West – Director of The Safe Side Of The Fence

15 July 2015 6:55 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

 

The Safe Side Of The Fence screens Sunday, July 19 at 1:00pm at The Tivoli Theater as part of this year’s St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase. Ticket information can be found Here

World War II’s Manhattan Project required the refinement of massive amounts of uranium, and St. Louis-based Mallinckrodt took on the job. As a result, the chemical company’s employees would become some of the most contaminated nuclear workers in history. Tony West’s new documentary The Safe Side Of The Fence both explores that legacy — St. Louis is still coping with the fallout of creating some of the world’s first nuclear waste — and tells the story of nuclear workers both past and present.

Tony West took the time to answer some questions about his film for We Are Movie Geeks in advance of its screening at the St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase.

Interview conducted by »

- Tom Stockman

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James Coburn: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

14 July 2015 11:18 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

I interviewed James Coburn in late 1998 for the cover story of the February 1999 issue of Venice Magazine. I had grown up watching Coburn on the late show, but also seeing him on the big screen, first-run. Meeting him was a thrill as he entered the living room of his manager, the late Hilly Elkins', home in Beverly Hills. Coburn was elegant, charming and had the grace of a cat. The only thing that revealed the health problems that had nearly done him in were his gnarled hands, the result of severe arthritis. We spoke about his role in Paul Schrader's newest film, "Affliction," which would earn him a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award. Later, as I walked Coburn to his Acura Nsx sport coupe, he bid me a warm farewell.

Several months later, I encountered him again at The Independent Spirit Awards, in Santa Monica. I went up »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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‘A Life at Stake’ is a fun poke at the deadly implications of life insurance

10 July 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

A Life at Stake

Written by Russ Bender, Hank McCune

Directed Paul Guilfoyle

U.S.A., 1954

Edward Shaw (Keith Andes) spends most of his days lumped on his chair, staring out the window from his cramped little apartment room. A scorned man, he was once a star on the rise in the real estate business, that is, until a former partner swindled him. An embittered and stubbornly honest man, Edward’s hope at redemption and to improve his name in the business arrives one morning when a lawyer presents him the opportunity to pay back his debts and make new headways in his line of profession. His first order of duty involves meeting Doris Hillman (Angela Lansbury), the business-savvy wife of a successful entrepreneur, Gus Hillman (Douglas Dumbrille). Doris knows her way around in the realm of real estate, not to mention how to allure men, both young and old. »

- Edgar Chaput

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'Franny' director Andrew Renzi plots next films

6 July 2015 3:41 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Upcoming projects include a ‘reimagining’ of Billy Wilder classic Sunset Boulevard.

Us director Andrew Renzi, whose feature debut Franny is showing at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Kviff) (July 3-11), is lining up his next projects, including a ‘reimagining’ of Billy Wilder’s 1950 classic Sunset Boulevard.

Richard Gere, Theo James and Dakota Fanning star in Renzi’s debut Franny, in which a philanthropist meddles in the lives of newly-married couples in an attempt to relive his past.

Samuel Goldwyn Films picked up the drama after its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival.

The 30-year-old director, whose 2014 documentary Fishtail about Montana cowboys also premiered at Tribeca and was then picked up by Netflix, will next return to Montana to film another documentary, this time about miners.  

Speaking to ScreenDaily following a Kv industry panel, director Renzi confirmed that he aims to shoot the documentary later this year or early next year with regular producing partner Andrew Corkin ([link »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Movie Review – The Seven Year Itch (1955)

30 June 2015 1:21 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Seven Year Itch, 1955.

Directed by Billy Wilder.

Starring Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell.

Synopsis:

Married man, Sherman, has to contend with the gorgeous woman upstairs when his family are away over the summer.

That shot. A train whirrs past beneath the vent and wind blows her dress up as she struggles to hold it down. She doesn’t move away from the revealing situation and instead tells he male companion, “isn’t it delicious?”. Her white, pleated dress design and platinum blonde hair means that this is Marilyn Monroe. A crowd had gathered, between 52nd and 53rd Street in New York City. Billy Wilder is in production of The Seven Year Itch, and photographer Sam Shaw is snapping the icon of the 1950’s. This became the moment that became a 26ft tall statue by Seward Johnson in Chicago, California and New Jersey, in Forever Marilyn. It is also the unforgettable, »

- Simon Columb

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Mel Gibson: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

30 June 2015 1:15 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Mel Gibson, whom I interviewed for Venice Magazine in late 2000, was my first real childhood hero I sat down with. If you were a Gen-x male, Mel Gibson was the closest thing we had to Paul Newman, Steve McQueen and Sean Connery: a guy's guy whom guys wanted to emulate and women wanted to copulate. If you were a guy who liked girls, the math in the previous equation was pretty simple: be like Mel. Sadly, Gibson's life has taken a very public turn for the worse in the last decade, since his personal legal and troubles stemming from a 2006 DUI arrest in Malibu were made public, one from which his image has yet to fully recover. It was an unfortunate fall from grace for a guy who literally had Hollywood, and the world, in the palm of his hand after sweeping the 1995 Oscars with his box office smash "Braveheart. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Sherlock Holmes: 10 offbeat takes on the Great Detective

29 June 2015 5:49 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From spoofs to point-and-click adventure games, here are 10 of the most memorable unusual incarnations of Sherlock Holmes...

We don’t know a great deal about the content of the 90-minute Sherlock special set to air later this year, but one thing has emerged from the set photos and tantalising titbits of information we’ve seen so far. Sherlock Holmes and John Watson will be in nineteenth-century garb, pitching them back into the setting of the legendary detective’s original adventures: 1895, to be precise. Why that happens is as yet unclear, but all will be revealed.

For those still craving their Holmes fix in the meantime, the new film Mr. Holmes offers us Ian McKellen’s take on the character, musing upon an old case as he looks back on his long career from the vantage point of retirement. Jonny Lee Miller’s ultra-modern, Us-based Sherlock will be entering his fourth »

- louisamellor

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Munich Films Festival Attracts Best of Global Filmmaking

25 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Munich has been a film-industry center for about a century. Camera company Arri launched there in 1917, and Bavaria Film Studios was established in 1919, although its founder, Peter Ostermayr, had been making movies in the city for several years before. Alfred Hitchcock shot his first released feature there in 1925, and was followed by such leading filmmakers as Billy Wilder, John Huston and Stanley Kubrick.

It is within that tradition that Diana Iljine, CEO and director of the Munich Film Festival, presents her event, which opens with David Oelhoffen’s Algeria-set Western “Far From Men,” starring Viggo Mortensen; the closing-night feature will be Matteo Garrone’s “Tale of Tales,” pictured above, starring Salma Hayek, fresh from its Cannes debut.

“Munich has always been a movie town,” Iljine says. The city remains one of the world’s great movie-business hubs, and that’s one reason why the festival attracts 2,000 or so film industry professionals, »

- Leo Barraclough

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The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

22 June 2015 4:02 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are »

- Andre Soares

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Actress Marthe Keller Remembers Her First Big Hollywood Film

19 June 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

U.S. film fans probably know actress Marthe Keller from such ’70s hits as “Marathon Man” and “Black Sunday,” or perhaps Claude Lelouch’s “And Now My Love.” True aficionados are likely to recall her Garbo-esque role in Billy Wilder’s “Fedora” or in Nikita Mikhalkov’s Oscar-nommed “Dark Eyes.” But European audiences have seen her work without a pause since, most recently in Barbet Schroeder’s “Amnesia,” which bowed in Cannes, and earned the Swiss-born actress some of the best notices of her career. Variety first spotted Keller in the Michael Caine spy thriller “Funeral in Berlin” in 1966.

Funeral in Berlin” was a big Hollywood film. How was the experience?

I was so young, I literally didn’t know what I was doing there. I came in one day and saw a beautiful woman getting made up and dressed for my character, so I thought, “This is it. I’ve been fired. »

- Steven Gaydos

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New on Video: ‘Ninotchka’ one of the best films from Hollywood’s golden age

15 June 2015 8:41 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Ninotchka

Written by Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, Walter Reisch

Directed by Ernst Lubitsch

USA, 1939

It’s easy to see why Ninotchka works as well as it does, and why it’s one of the best films from Hollywood’s golden age and of arguably Hollywood’s greatest year. Just look at the talent involved. Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, and Walter Reisch were all seasoned writers, though with their best work admittedly still to come. Ernst Lubitsch had directed a number of excellent silent films in Germany, had hit the ground running once in Hollywood, making his first American film with no less a star than Mary Pickford (Rosita [1923]), and after a series of charming musical comedies, many with Maurice Chevalier, directed the more sublime and sophisticated comedies for which he now best known, films like Trouble in Paradise (1932) and Design for Living (1933). While this was happening, Greta Garbo was working »

- Jeremy Carr

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Remembering Christopher Lee

12 June 2015 7:11 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We bid a fond farewell to the wonderful Christopher Lee, and salute some of his best roles...

Christopher Lee crammed a dozen lives into one. His Special Forces work in the Second World War remains shrouded in mystery. We do know that, in 1944, he climbed Vesuvius three days before it erupted. A fine, operatic singer, he famously released a heavy metal album in his later 80s. A skilled fencer, he performed all his own sword fights and has been killed on screen more than any actor in cinematic history. As a child Lee briefly encountered Prince Felix Yusupov, murderer of Rasputin, a part Lee would later of course play. Ian Fleming was a cousin, Muhammed Ali a friend and once dedicated a victory to Lee. Fluent in five languages, passable in another four, people like Lee don’t really exist anymore. In truth they probably never did.

One could write a lengthy, »

- simonbrew

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 101 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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