IMDb > Billy Wilder > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 56 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Daily | Rosenbaum, Scorsese, Glawogger

21 March 2015 10:12 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Jonathan Rosenbaum's posted the introduction to his 2004 book, Essential Cinema: On the Necessity of Film Canons as well as his list of 1,000 Favorites. Also in today's roundup of news and views: The new Film Quarterly features a dossier on Richard Linklater, Cahiers du Cinéma on Martin Scorsese in the 80s, Peter Cowie's memories of François Truffaut, Chris Cagle on Michael Glawogger's Workingman's Death, Jake Cole on Eric Rohmer's The Marquise of O, J. Hoberman on Jean Renoir’s A Day in the Country and Billy Wilder's Kiss Me, Stupid, Artforum and the New York Times on Shirley Yamaguchi and Setsuko Hara—and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Rosenbaum, Scorsese, Glawogger

21 March 2015 10:12 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Jonathan Rosenbaum's posted the introduction to his 2004 book, Essential Cinema: On the Necessity of Film Canons as well as his list of 1,000 Favorites. Also in today's roundup of news and views: The new Film Quarterly features a dossier on Richard Linklater, Cahiers du Cinéma on Martin Scorsese in the 80s, Peter Cowie's memories of François Truffaut, Chris Cagle on Michael Glawogger's Workingman's Death, Jake Cole on Eric Rohmer's The Marquise of O, J. Hoberman on Jean Renoir’s A Day in the Country and Billy Wilder's Kiss Me, Stupid, Artforum and the New York Times on Shirley Yamaguchi and Setsuko Hara—and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Please Murder Me’ sees underrated greats Lansbury and Burr go head-to-head

13 March 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Please Murder Me

Written by Donald Hyde and Al C. Ward

Directed by Peter Godfrey

U.S.A., 1956

*It should be noted that the following review contains spoilers pertaining to the film’s plot, including an important revelation on which most of the drama hinges. Readers have been forewarned.

Defence Attorney Craig Carlson (Raymond Burr) sits alone in his office late one night. Having turned on a recording machine he begins to narrate to a fellow lawyer that he is surely to be killed within the hour. At that moment the film flashbacks to some months ago when Craig approaches a dear old friend, Joe Leeds (Dick Foran) with terrible news: Joe’s wife and him have fallen in deeply in love. Joe appears visibly disappointed, but, curiously, less angry than one might expect. He implores Craig to give him time to mull over the situation. Shortly thereafter Joe returns home to see his wife, »

- Edgar Chaput

Permalink | Report a problem


Warner Home Entertainment Announces "The Golden Year Collection" Blu-ray Set

12 March 2015 7:17 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

Revisit 1939, Hollywood’s Greatest Year, with 4 New Blu-ray™ Debuts

The Golden Year Collection June 9

Features Newly Restored Blu-ray Debut of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Starring Charles Laughton, and Blu-ray Debuts of – Bette DavisDark Victory, Errol Flynn’s Dodge City and Greta Garbo’s Ninotchka. Collection also includes Gone With the Wind.

Burbank, Calif. March 10, 2015 – On June 9, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will celebrate one of the most prolific twelve months in Hollywood’s history with the 6-disc The Golden Year Collection. Leading the five-film set will be the Blu-ray debut of

The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in a new restoration which will have its world premiere at TCM’s Classic Film Festival beginning March 26 in Los Angeles. Charles Laughton and Maureen O’Hara star in Victor Hugo’s tragic tale which William Dieterle directed.

The other films featured in the Wbhe »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


New on Video: ‘Kiss Me, Stupid’

10 March 2015 12:17 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Kiss Me, Stupid

Written by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond

Directed by Billy Wilder

USA, 1964

How good was Billy Wilder? So good that this film, Kiss Me, Stupid—largely entertaining, frequently witty, beautifully shot, and with at least two noteworthy performances—probably wouldn’t figure in most lists of his top 10 movies. Yet it is a good Billy Wilder film, if not a great one.

Starting in Las Vegas, we are introduced to Dino, a womanizer, a drunk, an accomplished singer, and a clever jokester. Dean Martin, in a bit of curiously inspired and rather daring casting, plays the rapscallion; not surprisingly, he does so very well. On his way to Los Angeles, he stops in Climax, Nevada (with all the sexual innuendo built into this film, the town’s name almost seems the least obvious). There he encounters Orville (Ray Walston), a nebbish piano teacher and amateur songwriter who »

- Jeremy Carr

Permalink | Report a problem


Wright Minibio Pt.2: Hitchcock Heroine in His Favorite Movie

6 March 2015 8:28 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt': Alfred Hitchcock heroine (image: Joseph Cotten about to strangle Teresa Wright in 'Shadow of a Doubt') (See preceding article: "Teresa Wright Movies: Actress Made Oscar History.") After scoring with The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver, and The Pride of the Yankees, Teresa Wright was loaned to Universal – once initial choices Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland became unavailable – to play the small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt. (Check out video below: Teresa Wright reminiscing about the making of Shadow of a Doubt.) Co-written by Thornton Wilder, whose Our Town had provided Wright with her first chance on Broadway and who had suggested her to Hitchcock; Meet Me in St. Louis and Junior Miss author Sally Benson; and Hitchcock's wife, Alma Reville, Shadow of a Doubt was based on "Uncle Charlie," a story outline by Gordon McDonell – itself based on actual events. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Goings On | New York and Beyond

6 March 2015 9:51 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

With bittersweet anticipation, we look forward to the final seven episodes of Mad Men's final season. Matthew Weiner has selected "ten movies that had an important influence" on the show for a series running at the Museum of the Moving Image—and he's written the descriptions for each himself: Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest and Vertigo, Billy Wilder's The Apartment, David Lynch's Blue Velvet, Claude Chabrol's Les Bonnes Femmes, Fielder Cook's Patterns, Delbert Mann's Dear Heart and The Bachelor Party, Jean Negulesco's The Best of Everything and Arthur Hiller's The Americanization of Emily. Today's entry features more goings on in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, London, Venice and beyond. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


10 Movies That Influenced ‘Mad Men’, According to Matthew Weiner

6 March 2015 7:30 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

As Mad Men prepares to come to an end, Matthew Weiner is taking a moment to look back at its roots. The series creator has offered up a list of 10 films that influenced Mad Men, ranging from Billy Wilder‘s The Apartment to David Lynch‘s Blue Velvet. Click through to read the list, along with […]

The post 10 Movies That Influenced ‘Mad Men’, According to Matthew Weiner appeared first on /Film. »

- Angie Han

Permalink | Report a problem


10 Movies Matthew Weiner Assigned As Required Viewing For The 'Mad Men' Cast & Crew

5 March 2015 12:33 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This spring, AMC's "Mad Men" will say goodbye, yet it's impact will be felt for a long time. Few shows would garner a major exhibition at Museum Of The Moving Image, but no one could possibly dispute that Matthew Weiner's examination of the men and women of the advertising world of the 1960s is one of them. Running in conjunction with the final episodes of the show will be a film series titled "Required Viewing: Mad Men's Movie Influences." The screenings will feature movies that Weiner had the cast and crew watch and were a key influence on the show. It's an interesting blend of titles from Billy Wilder's classic "The Apartment," to Alfred Hitchcock thrillers "North By Northwest" and "Vertigo," to David Lynch's head-spinning "Blue Velvet," as well as less celebrated films from the likes of Delbert Mann and Jean Negulesco. Weiner has added some key »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


10 Movies Matthew Weiner Assigned As Required Viewing For The 'Mad Men' Cast & Crew

5 March 2015 12:33 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

This spring, AMC's "Mad Men" will say goodbye, yet it's impact will be felt for a long time. Few shows would garner a major exhibition at Museum Of The Moving Image, but no one could possibly dispute that Matthew Weiner's examination of the men and women of the advertising world of the 1960s is one of them. Running in conjunction with the final episodes of the show will be a film series titled "Required Viewing: Mad Men's Movie Influences." The screenings will feature movies that Weiner had the cast and crew watch and were a key influence on the show. It's an interesting blend of titles from Billy Wilder's classic "The Apartment," to Alfred Hitchcock thrillers "North By Northwest" and "Vertigo," to David Lynch's head-spinning "Blue Velvet," as well as less celebrated films from the likes of Delbert Mann and Jean Negulesco. Weiner has added some key »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Sherlock Holmes Tackles An Unsolved Case In First Trailer For ‘Mr. Holmes’ Starring Ian McKellen

4 March 2015 8:05 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

We've seen Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes on screen dozens of times in myriad different forms; from Billy Wilder's "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes," to Guy Ritchie's more "Maxim"-friendly versions with Robert Downey Jr., to the comedic “Without A Clue” in 1988 with Ben Kingsley (to name a few). But never have we seen Holmes retired and in the winter of his life. Is that interesting? It is a movie? We kind of had our doubts, but Bill Condon’s “Mr. Holmes” premiered in Berlin this past February and it turns out it’s pretty damn good (here’s our review). Maybe it has to do something with the excellent lead actor: Ian McKellen who apparently puts in a terrific performance. Here’s the longform synopsis released during Berlin: England in 1947. The famous detective Sherlock Holmes, now 93 years old, lives in his Sussex country house. When »

- Edward Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Boy Next Door’ Review

28 February 2015 7:20 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Jennifer Lopez, Ryan Guzman, Kristin Chenoweth, Ian Nelson, John Corbett, Lexi Atkins, Hill Harper | Written by Barbara Curry | Directed by Rob Cohen

If I tell you that The Boy Next Door has more in common with The Room and Troll 2 than the work of Alfred Hitchcock, would you consider that a good thing? Don’t bother answering because of course you would. Both films are masterworks of a certain kind of tone, and while Jennifer Lopez’s latest acting effort may not ever reach the same cult status of either, I would say it’s more than a worthy successor to their legacy. That legacy specifically being one of films that are received in more or less the opposite way to how their creators conceived.

Going into this film on the premise and trailer alone, I was fully expecting a tedious, melodramatic thriller that builds to a ludicrous »

- Mark Allen

Permalink | Report a problem


What's Streaming: Flawed But Still Very Very Funny

26 February 2015 12:30 PM, PST | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

With the slightest excuse, I can go on and on about how Some Like It Hot is truly the perfect comedy if not the perfect movie. Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond's script has a perfect symmetry -- every setup is paid off, every gag is repeated bigger, better and often with a kind of lyricism ("we have the same type blood, type O"). The timing of the maracas scene is breathtakingly brilliant. People like to gossip about director Wilder's difficulty in working with Marilyn Monroe but you see none of that onscreen. Most importantly, I've seen the movie countless times but it's still funny, every single time.

Recently I've been interested in -- and vastly entertained by -- comedies that aren't perfect, and that don't quite work for one reason or another. The thin, ridiculous plot is just an excuse for strings and strings of gags. You can see »

- Jette Kernion

Permalink | Report a problem


Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


Off the Carpet: Unexpected virtue at the 87th Oscars

23 February 2015 1:51 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The fact is I think Alan Sepinwall's review said it perfectly, right there in the headline, really. The 87th Oscars was a memorable event despite itself. A number of touching speeches and human moments on the Dolby Theater stage mostly mitigated some tone deaf writing, late-night-level jokes and an overall flatly produced show that started off so promisingly with an inspired opening number. It was, within that, a rather fitting and organic end to an unusual film awards season. And of course it ended on a note of PC outrage. Who would expect less in this day and age? A number of socio-political statements were made by the evening's winners and none of them rang a false note. It was like the sincerity of significance was clawing past the show's need to go viral or something (thematically interesting to me given what's being studied in the Best Picture victor). Common »

- Kristopher Tapley

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars poll: Who gave the best acceptance speech?

22 February 2015 10:02 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

If you thought some of this year’s Oscar races were tough to decide, now we are asking you to choose who gave the best speech at this year’s telecast. And it is a tough task as there were some colossal ones.  Vote in our poll below and sound off in the comments section at the bottom of the post if your favorite is missing so we can add it.  -Break- Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu: Best Director ("Birdman") The big winner of the night, may also have had the best speech, if not the funniest, when he picked up the helming prize: “Good luck charms work because at the DGA Awards I was wearing a Raymond Carver shirt, Billy Wilder tie, and I won. But tonight I am wearing the real Michael Keaton tighty-whities. They are tight but it work. I’m here. Thank you Michael.” Patricia Arquette: Best »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars poll: Who gave the best speech?

22 February 2015 10:02 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

If you thought some of this year’s Oscar races were tough to decide, now we are asking you to choose who gave the best speech at this year’s telecast. And it is a tough task as there were some colossal ones.  Vote in our poll below and sound off in the comments section at the bottom of the post if your favorite is missing so we can add it.  -Break- Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu: Best Director ("Birdman") The big winner of the night, may also have had the best speech, if not the funniest, when he picked up the helming prize: “Good luck charms work because at the DGA Awards I was wearing a Raymond Carver shirt, Billy Wilder tie, and I won. But tonight I am wearing the real Michael Keaton tighty-whities. They are tight but it work. I’m here. Thank you Michael.” Patricia Arquette: Best »

Permalink | Report a problem


John Boorman on ‘Queen and Country,’ Retirement and Why ‘Boyhood’ Disappointed Him

20 February 2015 3:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

John Boorman mined his childhood memories to great acclaim in 1987’s “Hope and Glory,” which mixed humor and pathos in a story about coming of age during The Blitz.

He returns to his personal history once more with “Queen and Country,” a sequel of sorts and a reflection on his years spent as a draftee in the armed services teaching recruits how to type before they were shipped off to Korea. The picture is sort of a lyrical “No Time for Sergeants,” as Boorman’s alter-ego, re-christened Bill Rohan and played by Callum Turner, finds himself at odds with army brass, gets into mischief with his best mate by stealing the regimental clock, and must defend himself from a charge of “seducing an officer from his duty” for airing his grievances about British foreign policy.

“Queen and Country” opens in limited release on Friday. The 82-year-old Boorman, whose list of »

- Brent Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: 66-Minute Compilation Of Saul Bass' Famous Movie Title Sequences From Preminger To Scorsese

19 February 2015 10:05 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Talk about a legacy. Acclaimed titles designer Saul Bass worked with some of Hollywood’s most legendary directors during his 40-plus year career, and on some of their best pictures. His first title credit was on Otto Preminger’s 1954 “Carmen Jones.” From there, Bass went on to collaborate on over 60 films, many of which have become much deserved cinema classics. In this hour-long compilation, YouTube user FlaneurSolitaire pieces together scores of Bass’ revered title sequences in chronological order, starting with “The Man with the Golden Arm” (also directed by Preminger), from 1955. (Bass’ credits from that year alone also include Robert Aldrich’s “The Big Knife,” “The Shrike” helmed by José Ferrer, Billy Wilder’s “The Seven Year Itch,” and “The Racers,” which starred Kirk Douglas and was directed by Henry Hathaway.) “The Racers” wasn’t the only Kirk Douglas film Bass did the titles for; he also designed them for »

- Zach Hollwedel

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 56 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners