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1-20 of 76 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Great Job, Internet!: Read This: How Wedding Crashers became “this generation’s Animal House”

26 June 2017 9:34 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Wedding Crashers opened more than a decade ago to rave reviews, going on to unexpectedly make some $200 million at the box office. A new oral history from Mel Magazine digs into the movie’s success, using firsthand interviews with the movie’s director, writers, stars, and crew, and in the process it lays out a straight line from some of their behind-the-scenes decisions to the resurgence of bromance comedies (like The Hangover and many Judd Apatow movies) in intervening years.

Casting was crucial for this. The film hinges on the comic repartee of stars Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn, but also features a slate of then-unknown talents like Isla Fisher, Bradley Cooper, and Rachel McAdams, as well as well-placed supporting spots from Jane Seymour and Christopher Walken. Director David Dobkin insisted upon several weeks of rehearsals, during which improvisation and actor input was considered and then put into a »

- Clayton Purdom

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Tamed Aliens, Harmonic Nuns and a Leather Catsuit: Strange Tales from 1992’s Summer of Cinema

23 June 2017 3:43 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Cai Ross

The summer movie season of 1992 opened under a cloud; a dark cloud from the still-smouldering buildings that had burned to the ground during the La riots in April. Racial tension after the disastrous acquittal of Rodney King’s uniformed attackers had reached an all-time high and Hollywood appealed for calm.

Thus, in a touchingly bold demonstration of selfless generosity, Walter Hill’s unremarkable urban thriller, The Looters, was hastily withdrawn and held back until Christmas, re-christened Trespass (memorably starring two Bills – Paxton and Sadler – and a pair of Ices – T and Cube). Elsewhere, it was business as usual.

The Rodney King affair was briefly alluded to in Lethal Weapon 3, the second-biggest hit of the summer and one of only a handful of ‘sure things’ on the menu. Though there were mutterings about the dominance of sequels in the summer movie season, there were weird things afoot in most of the other returnees. Aside from Lethal Weapon 3 – which was essentially a watered down Lethal Weapon 2 with too much added Joe Pesci – the rest of the sequels veered off into strange tangents, with varying results.

Alien 3, for example strayed dangerously far from the template set down by the first two classics. Bravely, it has to be said, David Fincher tried to create a quasi-religious epic, following Scott’s horror movie and Cameron’s war film. Latterly, Fincher’s frustrations and behind-the-scenes interferences became legendary, but audiences didn’t click with his compromised vision and it became the first in a long line of Alien movies to fall a bit flat.

Another major sequel, Honey, I Blew Up The Baby was in fact the complete opposite of 1989’s Honey, I Shrunk The Kids, culminating in the spectacle of a 99 foot toddler stomping through Las Vegas. It was directed without enthusiasm by Grease director Randal Kleiser, reminding audiences once again why no one remembers who directed Grease.

It wasn’t just sequels that dared to be different. One of the strangest mainstream offerings of the year was Robert Zemeckis’s black comedy, Death Becomes Her, which might have been a delicious satire on America’s vain obsession with cosmetic surgery if only Bruce Willis had stopped shouting at everyone like he was trying to prevent a plane crash.

Back in the ‘90s, much more so than today, comedies were a vital part of the summer success story – an inexpensive sop for the grown-ups while their teenage kids watched things explode in Screen 7. There were high hopes for Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn’s Housesitter, which was only a medium-sized hit, despite the bit where Steve Martin sings ‘Tura Lura Lura’ to his dad, and the other bit when his falls over his couch.

Boomerang was a bigger hit and restored some credibility to Eddie Murphy’s career after the crippling one-two punches of Harlem Nights and Another 48 Hours. It was also responsible for one of the great ironic ‘First Dance At a Wedding’ songs, Boys II Men’s The End of The Road.

Nicolas Cage embarked on a three year long career as a romantic comedy star with the rather wonderful Honeymoon in Vegas, famed for its skydiving Elvis finale. Tom Hanks and his Big director Penny Marshall reteamed to great success with wartime baseball comedy A League of Their Own, which also saw Geena Davis giving a star performance and Madonna giving a bearable one. “There’s no crying in baseball!!!” was probably the most quoted line of the summer.

As with City Slickers in 1991, comedy provided the biggest sleeper hit of the summer: Sister Act, with Whoopi Goldberg excelling as a murder witness hiding out in a convent. As with City Slickers, an unwise sequel was hastily made and hastily forgotten. The original though, was the sixth biggest film of the year and is still going strong as a west-end show to this day.

It wasn’t just the many and varied comic tastes of adults that were appeased; semi-literate young people were also provided for by Encino Man (or California Man as we knew it, since we don’t know where Encino is. It’s in California). Noted for Brendan Fraser’s first stab at the big time, this grungy caveman caper will be of interest to young contemporary archeologists keen to investigate who or what Pauly Shore was.

Teenagers were also palmed off with a silly-sounding comedy called Buffy The Vampire Slayer, written by first-time screenwriter Joss Whedon. Starring Kristy Swanson as the eponymous heroine, but marketed as a vehicle for Beverly Hills 90210 heart-throb Luke Perry, the producers had hoped for a chunk of the Bill & Ted audience that Encino Man hadn’t swallowed up. Sadly, they had to make do with a long-running spin-off television show regularly cited as one of the greatest ever made. Gnarly.

The stalking killer thriller phenomenon that started with The Silence of The Lambs and Cape Fear echoed into 1992 with solid hits like Unlawful Entry and Single White Female. Even Patriot Games – a sort-of sequel to The Hunt For Red October with Harrison Ford rebooting Alec Baldwin’s Jack Ryan – for all its CIA espionage and partial understanding of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, was basically a slasher movie, with Sean Bean doing to Harrison Ford what Robert De Niro had done to Nick Nolte the year before. (Sean Bean dies, obviously).

Crimes against the Emerald Isle weren’t restricted to the gratuitous amounts of Clannad in Patriot Games. Tom Cruise’s Irish accent in Ron Howard’s Far and Away was the benchmark for all bad Irish accents until Brad Pitt graciously took the relay baton in The Devil’s Own. The film, shot in glorious 70mm was the biggest risk of the summer and proved to be the dampest squib, considering the star power of Cruise and (then-wife) Nicole Kidman. Despite looking ravishing, the script had all the depth of a bottle-cap.  It desperately wanted to be a timeless classic in the David Lean tradition but held up against Unforgiven, which was released in August, Far & Away was shown up as the glorified Cbbc TV special it was.

Unforgiven came out of nowhere. Clint Eastwood’s previous movie, The Rookie, was somehow even worse than 1989’s Pink Cadillac. However, he’d been sitting on David Webb Peoples’ script for years until he was finally old enough to play William Munny. An extraordinary, mature and masterful critique of Western mythology, Unforgiven was hailed as Eastwood’s best work from the get-go, took the summer’s number five spot and would later win a handful of Oscars, including Pest Picture.

So who was the box office champion of Summer ’92? Well, that question was never in any doubt. Tim Burton’s Batman was the cultural phenomenon of 1989, redefining the parameters of box office limitations and merchandise licensing in a way not seen since Star Wars. Speculation as to who Batman would fight next and who would play him/her began immediately. Dustin Hoffman was touted to play The Penguin and Annette Bening was actually cast as Catwoman, before pregnancy forced her to drop out.

On the 19th of June, all was revealed when Batman Returns opened to a spectacular $45m weekend, $5m more than the original. Michael Keaton returned as The Caped Crusader (having split up with the creditably tight-lipped Vicki Vale), while not one but three villains put up their dukes. Danny DeVito played the Penguin as a deformed, subterranean leader of a gang of circus act drop-outs. Michelle Pfeiffer as Catwoman (perhaps her signature role) was transformed from a clumsy secretary into a vengeful whip-wielding dominatrix. Christopher Walken borrowed ‘DocEmmett Brown’s hair to play new villain, Max Shreck.

Despite the enormous opening weekend, things took a downward turn almost immediately. Audiences expecting more of the same were treated to a dark, nose-bitingly violent combination of German Expressionism, kinky S&M and oversized rubber ducks. The box office the following week dropped by 40%, and there was further controversy when McDonalds had to deal with the ire of horrified parents across America, ‘tricked’ by their Batman Returns Happy Meals into taking their kids to watch Burton’s deranged fairy tale, pussy jokes et al.

The backlash (against what is now considered a unique high-water mark in the superhero genre), meant that Batman Returns wound up making $100m less than its predecessor and it placed third for the year, behind Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, a film so determined to give its audience a familiar experience that it simply changed the first film’s screen directions from Int. Kevin’S House – Night to Ext. New York – Night and reshot the entire script. (The box office crown for the year was taken eventually by Disney’s Aladdin.)

Warner Bros. took evasive action, hiring Joel Schumacher to sweeten the mix, which would help to restore Batman’s fortunes in 1995, before everything, literally absolutely everything went wrong in 1997 and the world had to wait for Christopher Nolan to finish attending Ucl, become a director and save the Dark Knight from the resultant ignominy.

Hollywood was given a crash course in the perils of straying too far from a winning formula in the summer of ’92. Sadly, for a while at least, it learned its lesson.

The post Tamed Aliens, Harmonic Nuns and a Leather Catsuit: Strange Tales from 1992’s Summer of Cinema appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Cai Ross

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"Twin Peaks," Episode 7 Recap: …And That's Enough Said About That

20 June 2017 7:20 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.So that's how David Lynch does an info dump. First, with a cheeky, knowing scene featuring the brothers Horne: "Jerry, what's going on?" asks Ben (Richard Beymer) after his cannabis-infused sibling (David Patrick Kelly) phones him from the woods. "I think I'm high!…I don't know where I am!" Jerry screams, perhaps speaking for a good subsection of the Twin Peaks revival audience, who have, over the six prior installments, been given only glimpses of a larger picture. Narrative momentum comes in asides; the more prevalent longueurs are reserved for atmosphere and mood, for full immersion in apparent stasis.Part 7 shakes things up, following the brotherly freak-out with several story reveals that come in quick succession. But there's a niggling sense throughout all the »

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The Cast For Tim Burton’s Batman Returns Reveal A Few Secrets

20 June 2017 1:10 AM, PDT | Fortress of Solitude - Movie News | See recent Fortress of Solitude - Movie News news »

It’s hard to believe that it’s been 25 years since Tim Burton’s Batman Returns hit theatres on June 19th, 1992. The Hollywood Reporter recently sat down with Tim Burton, Michael Keaton, Michelle Pfeiffer, Danny DeVito, and Christopher Walken to discuss the making of the cult classic film. Not surprisingly, the cast and crew revealed some […]

The post The Cast For Tim Burton’s Batman Returns Reveal A Few Secrets appeared first on Fortress of Solitude. »

- Edward Nigma

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Michael Keaton Cut Over Half His Lines From Batman Returns

19 June 2017 12:32 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

This month, Batman Returns celebrates the 25th anniversary of its release in theatres. Back then, Tim Burton’s gothic drama caused a lot of controversy for its many dark, eerie or sexual scenes. Time has been kind to it, though, as nowadays the film is regarded as a cult classic for many Bat-fans.

To celebrate the movie, The Hollywood Reporter chatted with several members of the cast and crew recently, and the juiciest nugget of info from their interview is the news that Michael Keaton asked for more than half of his lines to be cut. Here’s what screenwriter Daniel Waters had to say about it:

“My version of the script had more a lot more Batman and Bruce Wayne speeches. Michael Keaton would go through the script and say, ‘Hey, that’s a great line, but you gotta cut it. This is a good speech, but you gotta take it out. »

- Christian Bone

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Batman Returns 25th Anniversary Secrets Revealed by Tim Burton and Cast

19 June 2017 10:26 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

It's been 25 years since Tim Burton's Batman Returns hit theaters. Now, the director and the cast have revealed untold secrets about its production. The Hollywood Reporter recently sat down with Burton, Michael Keaton, Michelle Pfeiffer, Danny DeVito, and Christopher Walken to discuss the making of this sequel to the original 1989 classic, which was released on June 19th, 1992. Tim Burton was set on making weirder, darker, less kid-friendly characters, while Keaton cut out the majority of his Batman lines to let the suit do the talking. And then there is Danny DeVito, who improvised the Penguin's off-putting thick, black saliva with a strange concoction.

The sequel was supposed to usher in the merchandising aspect of Batman. More action figures, McDonalds tie-in, and generally much more merchandise, but Burton and his crew's twisted take on the return of The Dark Knight turned off many who were looking forward to cashing in »

- MovieWeb

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The Beautiful and The Damned: Close-Up on Abel Ferrara’s "King of New York"

16 June 2017 6:30 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Abel Ferrara's King of New York (1990) is playing June 16 - July 16, 2017 on Mubi in the United Kingdom.“In striving to sin, to blaspheme, Ferrara’s heroes assert with Lucifer their moral autonomy, their sovereignty, their heroic identity, their glory, pitifully”—Tag Gallagher We’re introduced to Frank White (Christopher Walken) with one of director Abel Ferrara’s iconic roving pans, creeping left–right from the darkness of the prison wall to the harsh white of Frank’s cell. Frank is placed small in the frame, positioned slightly off-centre towards the bottom corner, his back to the camera as he prays silently. The prison bars dominate the composition, abstracted into silhouettes by Ferrara’s chiaroscuro lighting. A police baton enters the frame and knocks twice on the cell door, jarring Frank out of his concentration. The door is then »

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Atlanta Update: What’s Filming + Who’s Casting This Week 6/8/17

8 June 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Atlanta actors, listen up! Stay in the loop about what’s currently filming in your fair city (and projects that may just need an extra or two) with our weekly roundup. Rhavynn Drummer may just be the busiest casting director in town. Season 5 of “The Haves and The Have Nots” is wrapping up at Tyler Perry Studios, and Drummer is also teaming up with co-EPs Channing Tatum and Jenna Dewan-Tatum to cast the pilot for their “Step Up” series.  Last month, Pinewood Studios announced that Zach McGowan of Marvel’s “Agents of Shield” will spend the summer with us shooting the WWII historical drama, “Ni’hau.” At this time, it is reported L.A.-based Brad Gilmore is casting principals.Samuel L. Jackson will reportedly star in “The Last Full Measure.” Shooting in his hometown of Atlanta, the film will be another historical piece taking advantage of all this lush forest scenery, »

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Sushant Singh Rajput and his uncanny connection with Channing Tatum, Christopher Walken and Taylor Lautner

30 May 2017 9:52 PM, PDT | BollywoodHungama | See recent BollywoodHungama news »

Raabta is up for release and for Sushant Singh Rajput the film is truly important as he moves on from the sports arena [M.S. Dhoni – The Untold Story] to a romantic musical drama. What is also exciting is the fact that the film’s leading man Sushant Singh Rajput’s rise to fame has been nothingRead More

The post Sushant Singh Rajput and his uncanny connection with Channing Tatum, Christopher Walken and Taylor Lautner appeared first on Bollywood Hungama. »

- Bollywood Hungama News Network

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First trailer and images arrive for Netflix’s new show Ozark with Jason Bateman & Laura Linney

25 May 2017 9:33 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Scott Davis

Netflix has unveiled the first look at their new show Ozark, which debuts on the subscription service later this summer – you can check out the first trailer and debut images below!

The new show is directed and executive produced by Jason Bateman (The Family Fang, Office Christmas Party), who also stars in the show as Marty Bird, a financial planner who relocates with his family from a Chicago suburb to Missouri Ozarks, a summer resort community. The move has to do with Marty also being a top money launderer and after a job backfires, the second biggest Mexican drug cartel comes for them.

Bateman will direct half the episodes of the 10-episode series and marks a return to television series directing for the actor, who previously directed episodes of Arrested Development amongst others, as well as 2013’s Bad Words and 2015’s The Family Fang, which co-starred Nicole Kidman and Christopher Walken. »

- Scott Davis

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The behind the scenes battles of Pirates Of The Caribbean

24 May 2017 2:24 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Mark Harrison May 25, 2017

The Pirates Of The Caribbean movies have not been easy films to make....

As Michael Bolton once belted out: “This is the tale of Captain Jack Sparrow.” The Pirates Of The Caribbean film was a surprise sleeper hit in 2003, astounding the higher-ups at Disney who had long been sceptical of how a pirate movie, based on a ride at Disneyland, would appeal to audiences.

Off the back of this success, the sequels only got more ambitious and expensive in scale, with their use of practical effects and convoluted character dynamics serving to complicate the adventure format, with mixed results. It shouldn't shock you then, to hear that each of the movies released so far had some serious behind-the-scenes battles to make them shipshape.

The fifth and apparently final instalment, Salazar's Revenge (or Dead Men Tell No Tales), has had some very public battles before it has even been released, »

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How Roger Moore Made the Role of James Bond His Own

24 May 2017 2:13 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Few actors have come across quite so invincible onscreen as Roger Moore, the James Bond star who dodged death by sharks (“Live and Let Die”), yo-yo buzzsaw (“Octopussy”), space lasers (“Moonraker”) and a demented Christopher Walken (“A View to a Kill”), barely so much as creasing his tuxedo in the process.

Moore played 007 in seven movies over the course of a dozen years, dodging more bullets — golden and otherwise — than we could possibly count. But sooner or later, fate was sure to catch up with the debonair star. All men are mortal, of course, but not so Bond, who’s been saving the world since 1962 (“Dr. No”), and with his passing, Moore became the first big-screen Bond to leave us.

He was actually the third star to play the part, taking over the role from Sean Connery in 1973, and unlike Australian model George Lazenby (who played 007 just once, in “On »

- Peter Debruge

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Letters: Jonathan Demme obituary

19 May 2017 8:24 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jeremy Cameron writes: The film-maker Jonathan Demme had a huge interest in Haitian culture: he bought art and sponsored artists, helping to promote their work particularly in the Us. When he knew I was going there with my sister Sarah in the 1990s for her Caribbean Islands Handbook, he gave us contacts and arranged a guide. His name magically opened doors for us all over the country, where he was massively respected and indeed revered for his very genuine love of its art and his great generosity.

Bob Jacobson writes: A production that deserves to be added to your fine account of Jonathan Demme’s work is his version of Kurt Vonnegut’s Who Am I This Time?, shown in PBS’s American Playhouse series in 1982. It features a shy Christopher Walken alongside Susan Sarandon and Robert Ridgely in a quirky romantic comedy set in small-town America. This 53-minute piece »

- Jonathan Cameron and Bob Jacobson

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Battle of the Live Musicals: ABC Looks to Change the Game With Disney Classics

17 May 2017 12:48 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The broadcast network live musical trend shows no signs of slowing down, with five of the live events currently planned for the 2017-2018 season.

NBC, who pioneered the television events back in December 2013 with its successful staging of “The Sound of Music,” is currently prepping “Bye Bye Birdie” with star Jennifer Lopez for this December, and will air “Jesus Christ Superstar” this April. Fox is doubling down after the success of “Grease Live,” with plans for both a live version of “Rent” and “A Christmas Story.”

The newest player in the game is ABC, which on Tuesday announced it will dip its toe in the live musical waters with “The Little Mermaid.” ABC’s entry into the live musical space could prove to be a game changer, given the network’s access to Disney properties. Robert Mills, ABC’s head of alternative programming, told Variety that the network has been looking to stage a live Disney musical »

- Joe Otterson

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Richard Linklater, Kevin Smith and Miranda July Reveal ‘Split Screen’ Secrets During Indie Series Tribute

11 May 2017 11:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

For two years back in the late ’90s and early aughts, producer, filmmaker, author and cinephile John Pierson hammered together the lovingly Diy television series, which introduced movie buffs to all manner of filmmakers and their creations over the course of 60-plus episodes. “Split Screen” was IFCtv’s signature series from 1997-2001, boasting such guests as Spike Lee, Richard Linklater, Kevin Smith, Mary Harron, Katherine Dieckmann and many, many more.

Late last year, the cult classic found a new home over on streaming service FilmStruck, which began releasing episodes of the series on their Criterion Channel in December, with a tiered rollout planned.

Read More: ‘Split Screen’: 9 Reasons You Should Watch FilmStruck’s Revival of TV’s Best-Ever Series About Indie Film

On Wednesday night in New York City, the series’ reintroduction to the cultural consciousness continued apace, as Pierson and a group of some of his most famous »

- Kate Erbland

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Richard Linklater, Kevin Smith and Miranda July Reveal ‘Split Screen’ Secrets During Indie Series Tribute

11 May 2017 11:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

For two years back in the late ’90s and early aughts, producer, filmmaker, author and cinephile John Pierson hammered together the lovingly Diy television series, which introduced movie buffs to all manner of filmmakers and their creations over the course of 60-plus episodes. “Split Screen” was IFCtv’s signature series from 1997-2001, boasting such guests as Spike Lee, Richard Linklater, Kevin Smith, Mary Harron, Katherine Dieckmann and many, many more.

Late last year, the cult classic found a new home over on streaming service FilmStruck, which began releasing episodes of the series on their Criterion Channel in December, with a tiered rollout planned.

Read More: ‘Split Screen’: 9 Reasons You Should Watch FilmStruck’s Revival of TV’s Best-Ever Series About Indie Film

On Wednesday night in New York City, the series’ reintroduction to the cultural consciousness continued apace, as Pierson and a group of some of his most famous »

- Kate Erbland

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Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro and Christopher Walken Have a Deer Hunter Reunion at the Chaplin Award Gala

9 May 2017 7:28 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Nearly four decades ago, three of today’s biggest names in film starred together in the Oscar-winning Vietnam War movie Deep Hunter — and Meryl StreepRobert De Niro and Christopher Walken were together again on the red carpet for the Chaplin Award Gala in New York City.

On Monday, De Niro, 73, was honored with the Chaplin Award by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a lifetime achievement of excellence award. The actor’s former costars were on hand to celebrate him, posing together for photos on the red carpet.

The Deer Hunter — which starred Walken, De Niro and the late »

- Stephanie Petit

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Fisher Stevens to Direct Ex-Con Drama ‘Palmer’

4 May 2017 12:50 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Fisher Stevens, who directed “Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds,” has signed on to direct the independent drama “Palmer” for Route One Entertainment. Shooting will start by the end of June.

Stevens recently co-directed the HBO documentary “Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds” and National Geographic’s “Before the Flood,” featuring Leonardo DiCaprio. He won the Independent Spirit Award for co-directing and producing the documentary “Crazy Love” and won the Academy Award for producing the documentary “The Cove” in 2010.

Written by Cheryl Guerriero (“Hunting Season”), “Palmer” centers on an ex-con who returns to his hometown and forms an unexpected bond with a young boy abandoned by his junkie mother. The script was optioned by Route One last year and subsequently named to the 2016 Blacklist.

“Fisher’s success as an actor, film and theater director and documentary producer/director is truly unique in the business,” said Route One CEO Russell Levine. »

- Dave McNary

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Guardians of the Galaxy 2 Review #2: A-Holes Return with Heart to Spare

27 April 2017 11:19 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The first thing almost anyone will ask someone who has seen a new movie sequel, superhero or otherwise: "Is it better than the first?" By and large, it's an impossible question to answer, unless you're so in tuned with this person's taste that you feel comfortable enough in answering on their behalf. But, also, straight up, the number of sequels that are actually "better" than their predecessors are incredibly few and far between. The exceptions, like The Dark Knight and Spider-Man 2 are far outnumbered by the likes of Fantastic Four: The Silver Surfer, Batman Returns and even the McU is not immune, with Iron Man 2, not to mention the countless non-superhero sequels that fall far short of their predecessors. While a vast majority of the early reactions to Guardians 2 were positive, most believed it wasn't better than the original, but I just have to disagree. I do in »

- MovieWeb

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Uma Thurman and Rob Riggle join The War with Grandpa

26 April 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Uma Thurman and Rob Riggle have signed on to star alongside Christopher Walken and Robert De Niro in The War with Grandpa, director Tim Hill’s adaptation of Robert Kimmel Smith’s 1984 children’s book.

The official book description for The War with Grandpa reads: “Peter is thrilled that Grandpa is coming to live with his family. That is, until Grandpa moves right into Peter’s room, forcing him upstairs. Peter loves his grandpa but wants his room back. He has no choice but to declare war! With the help of his friends, Peter devises outrageous plans to make Grandpa surrender the room. But Grandpa is tougher than he looks. Rather than give in, Grandpa plans to get even. They used to be such great pals. Has their war gone too far?”

The War with Grandpa is being co-financed by Emmett/Furla/Oasis and Marro Films, and was initially brought »

- Gary Collinson

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