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1-20 of 156 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Emmy Awards: Are we underestimating Golden Globe winner Billy Bob Thornton (‘Goliath’)?

26 June 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Billy Bob Thornton won at the Golden Globes in January for his leading role on Amazon’s freshman legal series “Goliath.” The Oscar-winning actor (“Sling Blade”) earned rave reviews for his performance as Billy McBride, a former high-powered attorney whose career took an ugly turn upon his ousting from the law firm that still bears his […] »

- Paul Sheehan

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'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Billy Bob Thornton ('Goliath')

22 June 2017 8:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

"I was a late-comer to it because I came up as an actor in the '80s," says Billy Bob Thornton, the actor-writer-director, of the notion that people who first made their name in film might also do television, as we sit down to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's 'Awards Chatter' podcast in his trailer on the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood, where he currently is shooting the second season of the Amazon drama series Goliath. "Back then," he continues, "if you were doing TV, you were 'a TV guy,' you know? But now, the independent film business is »

- Scott Feinberg

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'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Billy Bob Thornton ('Goliath')

22 June 2017 8:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

"I was a late-comer to it because I came up as an actor in the '80s," says Billy Bob Thornton, the actor-writer-director, of the notion that people who first made their name in film might also do television, as we sit down to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's 'Awards Chatter' podcast in his trailer on the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood, where he currently is shooting the second season of the Amazon drama series Goliath. "Back then," he continues, "if you were doing TV, you were 'a TV guy,' you know? But now, the independent film business is »

- Scott Feinberg

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fargo’s David Thewlis On The Season Finale & Sinking His Teeth Into A Villain For All Times

21 June 2017 10:35 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Closing out its third (and possibly final) season tonight, Noah Hawley’s Fargo has always been marvelously specific with its characters, and particularly its villains. From Lorne Malvo (Billy Bob Thornton)’s bizarre bowl cut in Season 1 to V.M. Vargas (David Thewlis)’s rotten teeth in Season 3, the series makes surprising visual choices that defy understanding and elicit conversation. Alongside his henchmen, portrayed by Goran Bogdan and Andy Yu, Thewlis made the most of… »

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Screen Primetime Emmy Special

15 June 2017 9:19 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Browse the digital edition of Screen International, which focuses on the 2017 Emmys.

Click Here To Read The Digital Edition

This is Screen International’s first special dedicated to the outstanding programmes, showrunners, directors, writers and actors that find themselves in strong contention for this year’s Primetime Emmy awards. If we need any reminder that TV is an astonishing place at the moment, just look at the shows featured in this supplement’s pages: The Crown, Stranger Things, Black Mirror, Better Call Saul, Master Of None and Narcos, all produced for Netflix; Amazon Prime’s groundbreaking Transparent and Billy Bob Thornton-starrer Goliath; HBO’s Westworld, Big Little Lies, The Night Of and The Young Pope; Lee Daniels’ Empire for Fox; Hulu’s newest hit The Handmaid’s Tale; USA Network’s cyber thriller Mr. Robot; When We Rise, ABC’s docudrama mini-series about the Lgbtq-rights movement; and BBC/Amazon’s Fleabag, created by and »

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Rosewood: Morris Chestnut to Star in Second Season of Amazon TV Show

14 June 2017 9:17 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Morris Chestnut is moving on. Deadline reports the Rosewood star has joined season two of the Amazon TV show Goliath.The drama stars Billy Bob Thornton as Billy McBride, a washed up lawyer who takes on the major corporate firm he helped create. The show’s cast also includes Maria Bello, William Hurt, Olivia Thirlby, Sarah Wynter, and Molly Parker.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Morris Chestnut Joins Cast of Goliath for Season 2 as Billy Bob's Rival

13 June 2017 9:27 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

It’s out of the morgue and into the courtroom for Morris Chestnut.

The former Rosewood star has signed on to join the cast of Amazon’s legal drama Goliath for Season 2, according to our sister site Deadline. Chestnut will play chief deputy D.A. Hakeem Rashad, a criminal prosecutor who has a longstanding rivalry with Billy Bob Thornton’s defense attorney.

RelatedGoliath Renewed for Season 2, Names Dexter Ep as New Showrunner

The casting news comes just a month after Chestnut’s Fox drama Rosewood was cancelled after two seasons. Chestnut also had a series-regular role on Seasons 5 and »

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‘Goliath’: Morris Chestnut To Star In Season 2 Of Amazon Series

13 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Exclusive: Morris Chestnut (The Best Man) is set to star opposite Billy Bob Thornton on the upcoming second season of Amazon’s original drama series Goliath, slated to premiere next year. Chestnut was tapped for the role shortly after he became available following the cancellation of his Fox series Rosewood last month. On Goliath, Chestnut will play Chief Deputy District Attorney Hakeem Rashad, who was on the losing side of Billy's (Thornton) last criminal case and has a… »

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Emmy Race: Mini Category Gets Max Competition

8 June 2017 11:45 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Six years ago, this category couldn’t even stand on its own two feet. Now it’s one of the most competitive in all of Emmy-dom.

There are at least 12 TV series potentially vying for the limited series Emmy, as the category formerly called miniseries is now known, this season. The contenders boast starry talent and marquee creatives including Ryan Murphy, who helped revive the flagging miniseries category earlier this decade, and are backed by networks including FX, HBO, ABC, Starz and even National Geographic Channel.

It was a completely different story in 2011, when the TV Academy merged it (temporarily, it turned out) with the TV movie category after two consecutive years with just a pair of miniseries nominated for Emmys.

That same year, Murphy’s “American Horror Story” debuted on FX, helping to reinvent the miniseries and by extension revive the category. By the end of the show’s first 12 episodes, “Ahs »

- Rob Owen

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Emmy Race: Limited Category Overcomes ‘Mini’ Past

8 June 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Remember when we just called them miniseries?

Limited series couldn’t have a more complicated Emmy history: First a standalone category, then merged with TV movies, then separated yet again — and then renamed limited series. Talk about an identity crisis.

It’s hard to imagine, but back in 2009, there were only two — yes, two — nominees in the limited series category. We’ve come a long way since PBS’ “Little Dorrit” vied for the trophy against HBO’s “Generation Kill.” The Dickens classic — starring a then-unknown Claire Foy — took the prize, for what it’s worth.

Oh, how times have changed.

Now it’s one of the most hotly contested races, with high-profile projects boasting A-list star wattage rivalling what’s on tap at the local multiplex. Hollywood’s premier talent — behind and in front of the camera — is flocking to the small screen, lured by the promise of six- to eight-episode runs, and »

- Debra Birnbaum

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Drama Actor Roundtable: Riz Ahmed, Ewan McGregor on Why Loser Roles Are "More Fun Than Someone Like Trump"

1 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

<!--[Cdata[

Ewan McGregor has been a movie star for 20 years, but he's still petrified every time he takes on a new role. "My wife will tell you — there's a two-week period of, 'I'm not going to be able to do it,' " he says. Fifty-year veteran John Lithgow is in the same boat — just two days earlier, he admits, he suffered a bout of stage terror. The fear seems to resonate with the four other stars — Sterling K. Brown, 41; Riz Ahmed, 34; Jeffrey Wright, 51; and Billy Bob Thornton, 61 — who've gathered with Lithgow, »

- Lacey Rose

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Meet 'Fargo' Season 3 Breakout Olivia Sandoval

31 May 2017 8:04 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

[This interview kinda has spoilers through Wednesday's episode of Fargo, albeit not big ones.]

If the first season of Fargo was the season of Billy Bob Thornton and Martin Freeman, it was also the season of Allison Tolman

If the second season was a star vehicle for Patrick Wilson and Kirsten Dunst, it was also an introduction to Rachel Keller.

Noah Hawley's FX anthology series has been a showcase for all manner of big names wooed by the opportunity to do 10 episodes of well-regarded television, but it has also proved fertile territory for underutilized character »

- Daniel Fienberg

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‘Fargo’ Review: Carrie Coon Fights the Mashed Potato Theory, and Season 3 Gets Turned Upside Down

31 May 2017 8:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The review below contains spoilers for “Fargo” Season 3, Episode 7, “The Law of Inevitability.”]

Immediate Reaction

Who the heck is that dude wearing a wolf head?

Pardon our lapse in Minnesotan manners, but the ending of a brief but slow-moving “Fargo” threw us for a bit of a loop. It looks like Yui (Goran Bogdan), Varga’s henchman, but the dark lighting of our computer monitors isn’t the only reason we’re not 100 percent certain. If we hadn’t seen the face of the man who dropped into Nikki Swango’s (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) overturned prisoner transport bus, we would’ve left things at this: The wolf is a symbol repeatedly used for Varga (David Thewlis) throughout Season 5. In Episode 4, Billy Bob Thornton narrated a “symphonic fairy tale” where Varga played the wolf. Episode 5 ended with an ominous shot of a wolf’s head, meant to encapsulate Varga’s looming power as much as it foreshadows what’s to come.

With that in mind, »

- Ben Travers

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‘Fargo’ Review: Carrie Coon Fights the Mashed Potato Theory, and Season 3 Gets Turned Upside Down

31 May 2017 8:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The review below contains spoilers for “Fargo” Season 3, Episode 7, “The Law of Inevitability.”]

Immediate Reaction

Who the heck is that dude wearing a wolf head?

Pardon our lapse in Minnesotan manners, but the ending of a brief but slow-moving “Fargo” threw us for a bit of a loop. It looks like Yui (Goran Bogdan), Varga’s henchman, but the dark lighting of our computer monitors isn’t the only reason we’re not 100 percent certain. If we hadn’t seen the face of the man who dropped into Nikki Swango’s (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) overturned prisoner transport bus, we would’ve left things at this: The wolf is a symbol repeatedly used for Varga (David Thewlis) throughout Season 5. In Episode 4, Billy Bob Thornton narrated a “symphonic fairy tale” where Varga played the wolf. Episode 5 ended with an ominous shot of a wolf’s head, meant to encapsulate Varga’s looming power as much as it foreshadows what’s to come.

With that in mind, »

- Ben Travers

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Lead Actor in a Drama: The Frontrunners and Dark Horses for 2017 Emmys

31 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There is some serious star power in the race this year, including Oscar winners Kevin Spacey (sure to land his fifth consecutive nom for “House of Cards”) and Anthony Hopkins, a newcomer for “Westworld.” There are also Oscar nominees like Paul Giamatti (“Billions”), “Goliath’s” Billy Bob Thornton (an Oscar winner for screenwriting and a nominee for acting), Tom Hardy (“Taboo”) and Terrence Howard (“Empire”) in the mix. They’ll likely face off against last year’s winner for “Mr. Robot, “ Rami Malek, and returning nominees Kyle Chandler (“Bloodline”), Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”), Liev Schreiber (“Ray Donovan”) and Matthew Rhys (“The Americans”). Other first-year hits that could break in include Kiefer Sutherland (“Designated Survivor”) and Dan Stevens (“Legion.”) But the frontrunner is likely an actor who just became a household name in the last 18 months, Sterling K. Brown. He won an Emmy last year for channeling Christopher Darden in “The People v. O.J. Simpson »

- Variety Staff

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‘Goliath’ Ups Diana Hopper To Series Regular; Dominic Fumusa Also Cast

25 May 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Billy McBride will be seeing a lot more of his daughter Denise in the upcoming season of Amazon drama series Goliath. Diana Hopper, who recurred throughout the first season as Denise McBride, has been promoted to series regular for Season 2. In addition, Nurse Jackie alum Dominic Fumusa has signed on in a recurring role. In the upcoming season Billy’s (Billy Bob Thornton) newfound millions turned Denise into a trust fund kid, but his drinking and emotional distance have… »

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Emmy Preview: Who’s In and Who’s Out in Nine Key Categories

24 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

It’s that time of year again: Emmy season is upon us, and Variety’s coverage will begin in earnest in next week’s issue. But before we kick off a brand new race for TV’s top trophy, we’re taking a look at nine key categories and breaking down which of last year’s nominees are in and out of the race, who might stage a dramatic return and what newcomers have already made an impact on the kudos landscape.

Vasya Kolotusha for Variety

Drama Series

What’s out: HBO’s “Game of Thrones” won’t return until the summer, ensuring a new winner will be crowned this year. And PBS’ “Downton Abbey” closed its doors last year.

What’s back: FX’s “The Americans,” AMC’s “Better Call Saul,” Showtime’s “Homeland,” Netflix’s “House of Cards” and USA’s “Mr. Robot” are all eligible again.

Looking to return: Netflix’s “Orange Is the New Black” had »

- Geoff Berkshire

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‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in Bloody New Revenge Series

22 May 2017 8:43 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Sky has released a first look teaser for its upcoming western “Tin Star.” The 10-part revenge drama series stars Tim Roth (“The Hateful Eight”) and Christina Hendricks (“Mad Men”).

Read More: The Best One-Season Wonder TV Shows That Never Got Renewed — IndieWire Critics Survey

The bloody drama is set in a remote Canadian mountain town, where the opening of a new oil refinery fronted by the mysterious Mrs. Bradshaw (Hendricks) introduces the small town to a world of drug-dealers, prostitution and organized crime. Police chief Jim Worth (Roth) is thirsty for revenge after the murder of a member of his family. The series is written by Rowan Joffe, whose credits include 2010’s “The American” and 2014’s “Before I Go to Sleep.” Marc Jobst and Gilles Bannier directed two episodes, and Grant Harvey and Rowan Joffe helmed one episode each.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a »

- Yoselin Acevedo

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