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1-20 of 169 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Why ‘Fargo’ Is the Craftiest Show on TV and Season 3 Is the Best

3 August 2017 2:11 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In Season 3 of the acclaimed “Fargo” FX anthology series, showrunner Noah Hawley continued to play by the Coen brothers’ rules, but got more ambitious and flexible with a present-day crime drama. It’s still about good and evil, only now in cordial Minnesota, with plenty of parables, strong women and weak men. Yet the result was more satisfying in its craftiness and empathy in trying to bring order out of chaos.

And for its efforts, “Fargo” grabbed another 10 craft nominations (cinematography, which it won last year, three for editing, hairstyling, makeup, music score, sound editing, which it also won last year, and mixing). The work seemed more confident and daring, as it focused on various character pairings. It was about mistaken identities, being at the wrong place at the wrong time, and lots of suffering.

As the murders mounted, however, so did the confusion. Sleazy businessman Varga (nominated David Thewlis) prayed on feuding brothers, »

- Bill Desowitz

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Amazon catching up with Netflix in UK

3 August 2017 5:10 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Audience’s binge-watching habits exposed.

The Grand Tour broadcaster Amazon outpaced rival Netflix over the past 12 months, as Ofcom research revealed the UK has become a nation of box-set binge-watchers (reports Broadcast).

The Jeff Bezos-led SVoD service, which netted the UK rights to Atp World Tour tennis earlier this week, added more than 2 million subscribers in 2016, according to Ofcom’s Communications Market Report. It now has a total of 3.8 million subs, paying £7.99 per month, compared with 1.7 million in 2015.

While the home of shows including The Man In The High Castle and Billy Bob Thornton-fronted legal drama Goliath grew faster than Stranger Things broadcaster Netflix over the past 12 months, it continued to lag behind forerunner Netflix’s 6 million subs.

This was up from 5.1 million in 2015. The regulator’s research also revealed that Netflix, which costs a minimum of £5.99, was more popular than a handful of traditional catch-up services including Channel 4’s All 4 and Channel 5’s My »

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TVLine Items: Once Adds a Wicked New Witch, Y&R Scribes Exit and More

1 August 2017 10:58 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Once Upon a Time has conjured a new evil, casting Australian actress Emma Booth (Glitch) in the heavily recurring role of a witch “who is as wicked as they come,” our sister site Deadline reports.

Related Once Upon a Time Season 7 Trailer Reveals Hook as Cop, Barfly (?) Regina

Additionally, Giles Matthey is set to reprise his role as adult Gideon in the Rumple-focused fourth episode of the ABC drama’s upcoming Season 7, EW.com reports. As previously reported, Emilie de Ravin — who is no longer a series regular — will reprise her role in the same hour to “provide an update on Belle. »

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‘Goliath’: James Wolk Set To Recur In Season 2 Of Amazon Drama Series

31 July 2017 4:46 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Zoo star James Wolk is set for a guest arc opposite Billy Bob Thornton in the second season of Amazon's praised drama series Goliath, from David E. Kelley and Jonathan Shapiro. Wolk will play FBI Special Agent Jeff Clayton, who agrees to help Billy (Thornton) hunt down his prime suspect in the Marcos Pena murder, who was last seen in Ice custody. Meanwhile, Jeff shows a romantic interest in Patty (Nina Arianda). The new season of Goliath is executive produced by Peabody… »

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‘NCIS’: Maria Bello Joins Veteran CBS Drama As Series Regular

27 July 2017 11:30 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Maria Bello has joined the cast of CBS’ long-running drama NCIS as a new series regular opposite Mark Harmon for the upcoming 15th season. Bello is coming off a co-starring role opposite Billy Bob Thornton on the first season of the Amazon drama series Goliath. It is unclear whether she will appear in the second season, but she no longer is a series regular as NCIS has her in first position. Bello will play an NCIS agent who was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the… »

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How Maddox Jolie-Pitt Became Angelina Jolie's Right-Hand Man

26 July 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Angelina Jolie loved Maddox Jolie-Pitt the moment she saw him. After twice visiting Cambodia, while filming Lara Croft: Tomb Raider and on a Unhcr field trip, the actress returned the country in late 2001 with her then-husband, Billy Bob Thornton; they met Maddox Jolie-Pitt and subsequently applied to adopt him. And in March 2002, Angelina picked up 7-month-old Maddox from an orphanage in Battambang. The actress had been toying with the idea of adopting a child for some time, but didn't proceed until first talking it over with Loung Ung, whom she quickly befriended after reading her memoir, First They Killed My Father. "I asked her as a Cambodian orphan if she would be offended for somebody like me, an »

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Emmys 2017: Handicapping the Top Series and Performer Races

25 July 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

It’s that time of year again, when champagne corks are popped all over Hollywood in honor of the Television Academy’s Emmy nominations. But the true celebration cannot begin until the winners are announced live on Sept. 17. With so much high-quality TV vying for the top prizes — and some surprises among the nominees — it’s shaping up to be one of the most competitive Emmy seasons in years. Here, Variety breaks down the key races.

Drama Series

Taking the torch from “Game of Thrones,” which has been the most-nominated series for the past few years, is fellow HBO genre series “Westworld.” The sci-fi thriller is tied with long-running variety sketch series “Saturday Night Live” at 22 noms this year, the most of any series. More notably, it’s also one of five freshman series in the race — and that buzz may well boost it over long-in-the-tooth “House of Cards” (six noms for the Netflix drama), or even »

- Danielle Turchiano

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'Westworld', 'Saturday Night Live' lead Emmys nominations

13 July 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Shows each earned 22 nods on Thursday morning.

Westworld and Saturday Night Live led the pack on 22 nods each in all categories as the 2017 Primetime Emmys nominations were unveiled on Thursday morning.

Stranger Things and Feud: Bette And Joan followed on 18 apiece, then comedy staple Veep on 17, and The Crown on 13.

By company, HBO led the way on 110 nominations, with Netflix next on 91, and NBC on 60.

Thursday’s nominations underscored the rise of the streaming services, as Netflix and Hulu made emphatic statements, particularly in the drama categories with The Crown, Stranger Things and The Handmaid’s Tale. Netflix spent a lot on reaching Emmys voters, staging a month-long For Your Consideration residency in Beverly Hills earlier in the summer when it rolled out its heavy-hitters for daily publicity appearances.

The absence of Transparent in the comedy series category – despite an individual nod for last year’s winner Jeffrey Tambor – will sting executives at Amazon Studios, who overall »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Emmys Wish List: Fingers Crossed for These 10 Deserving Contenders

12 July 2017 1:40 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Nominations for the 69th annual Emmy Awards will be revealed tomorrow morning. As ever, we can only hope the 21,000-plus voting members can find interesting ways to acknowledge the year in television, rather than leaning on old standbys out of habit or, worse, ignorance to what’s fresh. You certainly can’t blame campaigns for doing everything they can to break through the glut.

While ballots were turned in two weeks ago and nothing I can do or say will influence the vote at this point, there are nevertheless a few deserving contenders worth championing that are at best on the bubble for a nomination, at worst completely buried by other choices. Fingers crossed we hear these names called tomorrow.

Comedy Series

Fleabag

Might as well start with the longest of shots. Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s six-episode series was one of the best things I saw on the small screen this year. It »

- Kristopher Tapley

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2017 Emmy Nomination Predictions: Which New Shows Will Break Through?

10 July 2017 12:02 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There were few surprises at the 2016 Emmy Awards, with most trophies going to the expected winners. But voters had a few shockers in store: recognizing Tatiana Maslany for her lead role on “Orphan Black” and Rami Malek for his lead role on “Mr. Robot.”

That gives hope that the Academy may continue to embrace even more new, diverse programming when the Emmy nominations are unveiled on July 13. It may have taken four years for “The Americans” to finally break through, but it would be a shock if this year’s crop of worthy freshmen series didn’t get recognized by the Academy.

We’ll find out who’s officially made the cut when nominations are announced on Thursday at 8:30 a.m. Pt, but here, Variety breaks down the major contenders in all of the biggest categories.

Drama Series

The Americans” (FX)

Better Call Saul” (AMC)

The Crown” (Netflix)

“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Stranger Things” (Netflix »

- Danielle Turchiano and Debra Birnbaum

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Casting a Zz Top Movie Biopic Would be Epic

10 July 2017 3:00 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

All kidding aside, over the recent Michael Stipe and David Letterman beard bro tweets, and the Twitter fan’s mention about who will direct them in the “Zz Top biopic”; the topic of making one has been stuff of rumor since 2011 when Billy Bob Thornton was named as readying his production company to film a Zz Top movie called Rough Boys. Thornton and the band members are longtime friends, and Texas neighbors, and to top it off (excuse the pun), Thornton was a member of Tres Hombres, one of the many Zz Top cover bands. Robert Rodriguez, was rumored to

Casting a Zz Top Movie Biopic Would be Epic »

- Nat Berman

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Halle Berry explains why her Oscar win "meant nothing"

6 July 2017 5:17 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Kirsten Howard Jul 6, 2017

In 2002 Halle Berry became the first black woman to win a Best Actress Oscar for Monster’s Ball, but her joy over it has waned.

Many of us can remember Halle Berry winning a Best Actress Oscar for her role in the 2002 drama Monster's Ball.

See related  Don Hahn interview: The Lion King, Disney, Pixar, Frankenweenie and the future of animation The Lion King: writer hired for live action movie

Playing the grieving widow of a man executed on death row, her sexually and emotionally charged on-screen relationship with Billy Bob Thornton's corrections officer led to a powerhouse performance as Leticia that, once seen, is hard to forget.

On Oscar night, she gave an impassioned acceptance speech. Standing there in her flowery mesh and wine-coloured dress, tears were shed as she became the first black woman to ever win the award. Fast-forward 15 years, and she's »

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Watch THR's Full, Uncensored Drama Actor Roundtable With Riz Ahmed, Ewan McGregor and More

3 July 2017 6:59 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Six stars at the top of their game — including Riz Ahmed (The Night Of), Ewan McGregor (Fargo), Billy Bob Thornton (Goliath), Sterling K. Brown (This Is Us), John Lithgow (The Crown) and Jeffrey Wright (Westworld) — open up about appreciating early struggles ("You forget what it feels like to dream"), the indignity of typecasting ("Terrorist No. 3 — I'd rather be broke") and the pros and cons of being one of only a few who know where your character is going.

Viewers can watch the roundtable discussions every Sunday on SundanceTV as part of the cable channel's original nonfiction series, Close »

- THR Staff

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Emmy Awards: Are we underestimating Golden Globe winner Billy Bob Thornton (‘Goliath’)?

26 June 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Billy Bob Thornton won at the Golden Globes in January for his leading role on Amazon’s freshman legal series “Goliath.” The Oscar-winning actor (“Sling Blade”) earned rave reviews for his performance as Billy McBride, a former high-powered attorney whose career took an ugly turn upon his ousting from the law firm that still bears his […] »

- Paul Sheehan

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'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Billy Bob Thornton ('Goliath')

22 June 2017 8:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

"I was a late-comer to it because I came up as an actor in the '80s," says Billy Bob Thornton, the actor-writer-director, of the notion that people who first made their name in film might also do television, as we sit down to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's 'Awards Chatter' podcast in his trailer on the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood, where he currently is shooting the second season of the Amazon drama series Goliath. "Back then," he continues, "if you were doing TV, you were 'a TV guy,' you know? But now, the independent film business is »

- Scott Feinberg

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'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Billy Bob Thornton ('Goliath')

22 June 2017 8:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

"I was a late-comer to it because I came up as an actor in the '80s," says Billy Bob Thornton, the actor-writer-director, of the notion that people who first made their name in film might also do television, as we sit down to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's 'Awards Chatter' podcast in his trailer on the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood, where he currently is shooting the second season of the Amazon drama series Goliath. "Back then," he continues, "if you were doing TV, you were 'a TV guy,' you know? But now, the independent film business is »

- Scott Feinberg

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fargo’ Season 3 Squandered TV’s Greatest Cast By Trying to Be Every Show At Once

22 June 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After two seasons worth of magic, “FargoSeason 3 — or Year 3, to use the preferred nomenclature — was finally unable to outrun the specter of Peak TV hovering over its shoulder. Even with one of the greatest TV casts ever assembled, the story of feuding brothers and a nefarious conglomerate slowed the series’ hot streak and brought it back down from the realm of tightly constructed, riveting crime drama into the realm of ordinary.

Wednesday night’s season finale showed why the rest of the previous episodes lacked the distinctive spirit that’s helped make “Fargo” into its own creative entity. The previous two seasons have funneled their experiences through the police officer Solversons at the center: Alison Tolman’s Molly and Patrick Wilson’s Lou both anchored their respective seasons amidst a maelstrom of criminal (and in notable instances, supernatural) activity.

Read More: Noah Hawley on the ‘FargoFinale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You Think

But with a near-unprecedented cast including Ewan McGregor, Carrie Coon, David Thewlis, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Scoot McNairy, Mary McDonnell, Shea Wigham and Michael Stuhlbarg, “Fargo” had that unique but very real problem of juggling an ensemble of actors who were each carrying their own shows within their respective plot lines. Gloria Burgle’s pursuit, the existential quandary of loyalty from Sy, and the classic, biblical blood feud between the two Stussy brothers all seemed like they were vying for supremacy in a show that tried to have it every way.

With all that impressive output in front of the camera, the various adventures that these characters went on seemed too stylistically disparate to be part of a focused season of television. Take Episode 8, “Who Rules the Land of Denial?” as an example. It’s a striking hour of TV, but one that owed its visual and philosophical approach to some of the other biggest TV shows on air right now. Nikki’s kitten-filled encounter in the bowling alley dipped into “Twin Peaks” territory, complete with Ray Wise’s presence. The bloody escape from the prison bus into the woods was practically a dimly lit “Game of Thrones” set-piece, complete with a surprise garroting.

These scenes came in the wake of the overtly Don Hertzfeldt-ian animation sequence from Episode 3 and presaged a “Leftovers”-adjacent piano theme at the end of Episode 9 that would probably make Max Richter do a double take. “Fargo” has always worn its influences on it sleeve, often with an accompanying wink and nod. This season felt like the first time some of the most gorgeous images on TV were in service of a faithful recreation of what’s worked elsewhere, rather than a visionary reinterpretation.

A series that had previously managed to bring together a nuanced look at opposing forces of good and evil managed to play this season fairly straight. By Thewlis’ own admission, V.M. Varga is a character completely without any redeeming qualities. He’s an out-and-out villain from frame one, drab business attire and all. The closest that he comes to any kind of sympathy is his sniveling, tiptoeing towards the elevator after he’s found out he’s under attack in the season finale.

Varga’s two defining characteristics — his rotting teeth and propensity to vomit up his nervous binge eating — were far more literal manifestations of the evil rotting him from inside and out than the show ever burdened its predecessors with. Lorne Malvo and Mike Milligan, previous “Fargo” heavies, were more than just sophisticated bad guys. Their calm demeanor, without much affectation, hinted at the insidious nature of human corruptibility. By placing all its narrative weight on a character who showed so much outward, borderline-cartoonish villainy, Season 3 robbed its central conflict of comparable substance.

And as far as the victim of Varga’s plotting, Emmit Stussy never really moved beyond being a hapless victim, closer to the bumbling cycle of unfortunate circumstances of Jerry Lundegaard from the “Fargo” film than the poisonous, bitter edge that Martin Freeman added to Lester Nygaard. As a result, Ewan McGregor’s double casting never really had the opportunity to move beyond a half-baked treatise on the nature of free will.

One of the reasons “Fargo” succeeded in creating something all its own in preceding installments is that it guided its ambiguities towards a greater purpose. Season 3’s many allegories and literary allusions left little room for interpretation or subversion. Whether listening to Billy Bob Thornton explain the opening of “Peter and the Wolf,” Varga explain Lenin’s appreciation Beethoven, or a series of animated characters float through the Stussy-authored sci-fi universe, each of these came with a blatant, explicit connection to the characters we saw on the screen. In previous seasons, those conclusions would be left to the audience to draw.

The conversation between Gloria and Winnie in Season 3’s penultimate episode also helped to underline this idea. A mystery that our own Ben Travers pointed out fairly early on — Gloria’s invisibility to technology — was made more intriguing by the explanatory distance the show took from it. But in baring her soul to Winnie, there was Gloria expressing all of those concerns out loud in convenient, metaphorical detail. The old “Fargo” would have had her merely stare down the bathroom sink sensor before finally realizing that her circumstances had changed, taking out any references to it in the conversation that came before.

As one final parting confirmation, the show delivered its Season 3 version of a time jump; a transformation that seemed so radical in Season 1 but here seems like a tacked-on afterthought. That audience handholding became even more literal when, without leaving the audience to fill in the blanks, it put the aftermath of the Stussy fortune in direct on-screen text. You could argue that this is a playful, twisted diversion meant to make Emmit’s kitchen assassination all the more shocking. But instead it seemed like a final emphatic exclamation point on the season’s special brand of reinforced cynicism.

Read More: The Coen Brothers’ Rules: 4 Filmmaking Practices That Give ‘Fargo’ Its Cinematic Consistency

All told, this season of “Fargo” was far from without merit. As much as Sy was hamstrung for most of the season, Stuhlbarg still proved that he’s one of the greatest working actors and a worthy addition to the series’ roster of Coen Brothers alumni. The Ray Stussy apartment ambush sequence is one of the best-directed scenes of the year. And the finale’s Mexican standoff was delivered in such a simple and unadorned way that made its consequences all the more tragic.

But even in the artistry of showing the two bodies fall from far away, Nikki’s character farewell underlined how much this version of “Fargo” reveled in making each new development as definitive as possible. A bullet hole to the forehead leaves little room for doubt. “Fargo” is still one of TVs most visceral crime shows, but one thing it didn’t borrow from its fellow 2017 TV shows was to let the mystery be.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Fargo' Review: Season 3 Finale Ends the Debate and Tells Us If We've Been Wasting Our BreathNoah Hawley on the 'Fargo' Finale and Why the Fate of Gloria Burgle Matters More Than You ThinkHow Editors of 'The Crown,' 'American Gods,' and 'This Is Us' Achieved Emotional Power »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fargo’s David Thewlis On The Season Finale & Sinking His Teeth Into A Villain For All Times

21 June 2017 10:35 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Closing out its third (and possibly final) season tonight, Noah Hawley’s Fargo has always been marvelously specific with its characters, and particularly its villains. From Lorne Malvo (Billy Bob Thornton)’s bizarre bowl cut in Season 1 to V.M. Vargas (David Thewlis)’s rotten teeth in Season 3, the series makes surprising visual choices that defy understanding and elicit conversation. Alongside his henchmen, portrayed by Goran Bogdan and Andy Yu, Thewlis made the most of… »

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Screen Primetime Emmy Special

15 June 2017 9:19 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Browse the digital edition of Screen International, which focuses on the 2017 Emmys.

Click Here To Read The Digital Edition

This is Screen International’s first special dedicated to the outstanding programmes, showrunners, directors, writers and actors that find themselves in strong contention for this year’s Primetime Emmy awards. If we need any reminder that TV is an astonishing place at the moment, just look at the shows featured in this supplement’s pages: The Crown, Stranger Things, Black Mirror, Better Call Saul, Master Of None and Narcos, all produced for Netflix; Amazon Prime’s groundbreaking Transparent and Billy Bob Thornton-starrer Goliath; HBO’s Westworld, Big Little Lies, The Night Of and The Young Pope; Lee Daniels’ Empire for Fox; Hulu’s newest hit The Handmaid’s Tale; USA Network’s cyber thriller Mr. Robot; When We Rise, ABC’s docudrama mini-series about the Lgbtq-rights movement; and BBC/Amazon’s Fleabag, created by and »

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