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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 60 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Borgman | Blu-ray Review

16 September 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Ushered forth as the Netherlands’ submission for Best Foreign Language Film this year, Alex van Warmerdam’s hilarious Borgman may prove to be a bit too offbeat for the mainstream tastes of the Academy, at least if judging by its business at the Us box office bears any indication. Arriving on blu-ray from Drafthouse Films, word of mouth may continue to bolster its growing reputation, selected by a number of critics as a standout title for the first half of 2014. Whatever the case, it’s granted considerable attention to the underrated Dutch director whose next little bit of weirdness should arrive next year.

Alex van Warmerdam’s Borgman has to be the steadily working director’s most accomplished work to date. Known mostly for his droll, sometimes perverse films dealing with families or communities tested by strange situations that range anywhere from a maintained weirdness to potential violence, his latest »

- Nicholas Bell

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Scott Glenn Joins Marvel’s Daredevil As Stick

15 September 2014 3:04 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

In another move that shows how much inspiration the upcoming Daredevil Netflix series will draw from Frank Miller’s run in the comics, Marvel has cast Scott Glenn (The Hunt for Red October, Silence of the Lambs) as Stick, the mysterious martial artist famous for training both Elektra and the titular Man Without Fear.

Stick was created by Miller in 1981, where he’s depicted as a blind master martial artist who not only teaches a young Matt Murdock how to fight, but how to control his senses and develop his “radar sense.” Stick is also revealed to be the leader of a warrior order called The Chaste that regularly fought with a mercenary group known as The Hand.

Stick was last played by Terence Stamp in the terrible 2005 film Elektra from 20th Century Fox. The studio heads at Marvel must have erased that casting from their minds, however, as the »

- James Garcia

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Scott Glenn joins 'Daredevil' cast as Matt Murdock's mentor

15 September 2014 2:28 PM, PDT | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

Casting announcements for Marvel’s first foray into Netflix, next year’s Daredevil, continue to roll out one by one. While many of the major players in Hell’s Kitchen have been cast, Marvel today announced who will play an  piece of Matt Murdock’s story: his mentor.

Most recently seen as Kevin Garvey Sr. on HBO’s The Leftovers, Scott Glenn has been cast as Stick, a martial artist who helps guide Murdock as he assumes the Daredevil mantle. Glenn has also been in several dozen films, including The Bourne Ultimatum and Silence of the Lambs.

Stick is a character shrouded in mystery, »

- Jonathon Dornbush

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Scott Glenn set to play Stick in Marvel’s Daredevil

15 September 2014 2:11 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Scott Glenn has been announced by Marvel to play the mysterious martial artist and mentor to Daredevil, Stick, in the upcoming Netflix series which is set to debut next year. Glenn is best known for his roles in The Bourne Ultimatum, The Silence of the Lambs, Training Day and Apocalypse Now. This is not the first time that the character of Stick will appear in live action, with Terence Stamp previously playing the role in Elektra back in 2005.

“Stick is one of the most important figures in Matt Murdock’s life and Scott Glenn embodies all the qualities of someone so integral to this hero’s journey,” said Jeph Loeb, Marvel’s Head of Television. “There are few actors who could bring such the authenticity, gravitas and charisma to such a key role in Matt’s journey to become the super hero we call Daredevil.”

Glenn joins a growing cast »

- Thomas Roach

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The Definitive ‘What the F**k?’ Movies: 20-11

13 September 2014 7:07 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

20. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998)

Directed by: Terry Gilliam

So…drugs, right? Based on Hunter S. Thompson’s 1971 novel of the same title, Fear and Loathing stars Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro as Raoul Duke and Dr. Gonzo, respectively. The pair is heading to Sin City, speeding through the Nevada desert, under the influence of mescaline. From there, the film is series a bizarre hallucinations seen through the eyes of Duke. So, we jump from hotel room to hotel room, all of the action a blur of what is happening and what really isn’t. Throughout the course of the film, Duke and/or Gonzo ingest the following drugs: mescaline, sunshine acid, diethyl ether, LSD, cocaine, and adenochrome (probably more). Duke – who is a Thompson stand-in – is supposed to be writing an article before heading back to Los Angeles, but tends to get sidetracked quite a bit. In »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Duke of Burgundy | 2014 Tiff Review

9 September 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

The Body and the Whip: Strickland’s Sublime Homage to Erotic Cinema

Beginning like something that should have been called Exploits of a Chambermaid, replete with a fantastically sumptuous rendering of a vintage title sequence lifted right out of the 1970s, Peter Strickland’s The Duke of Burgundy seduces us immediately. Much like his last film, the incredibly underrated Berberian Sound Studio, which was an homage to the giallo genre, his latest is a reconsideration of erotic exploitation cinema, where names like Jesus Franco and Jean Rollin garnered a notable cult following. But considering such influences, Strickland’s title is hardly cheap, though one would be remiss to deny a certain air of tawdry sentiment.

Evelyn (Chiara D’Anna) is a newly hired housekeeper. Making her way to her new employer, a strict, unfriendly woman named Cynthia (Sidse Babett Knudsen), it seems they already have a tense relationship that may »

- Nicholas Bell

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Tiff 2014 Preview: Raoul Peck's Haiti-Set Mystery Loosely-Based On Pier Paolo Pasolini's 'Teorema'

4 September 2014 8:44 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

Set to make its world premiere at the 39th edition of the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff), which kicks off today, is Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck's latest work, titled "Murder in Pacot," which we first alerted you to in May, when it was wrapping up principal photography. The feature film is loosely inspired by Italian director, Pier Paolo Pasolini's 1968 drama/mystery "Teorema," which starred Terence Stamp as a mysterious stranger who injects himself into the home of a wealthy Italian family, and seduces everyone in it, including the maid, which leads to each of them reaching some unique epiphany, »

- Tambay A. Obenson

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First-Look At Raoul Peck's Haiti-Set Mystery Loosely-Based On Pier Paolo Pasolini's 'Teorema'

19 August 2014 11:41 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

Set to make its world premiere at the 39th edition of the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff) next month is Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck's latest work, titled "Murder in Pacot," which we first alerted you to in May, when it was wrapping up principal photography. The feature film is loosely inspired by Italian director, Pier Paolo Pasolini's 1968 drama/mystery "Teorema," which starred Terence Stamp as a mysterious stranger who injects himself into the home of a wealthy Italian family, and seduces everyone in it, including the maid, which leads to each of them reaching some unique epiphany, leaving viewers »

- Tambay A. Obenson

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Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz in images from Tim Burton's 'Big Eyes'

4 August 2014 2:41 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The start of production on "Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass" isn't the only Tim Burton news happening.  Additionally, newly released, are the first two images (below) from the Burton directed "Big Eyes." The stills, which first appeared in USA Today, show Amy Adams by herself, painting, in one image and her with Christoph Waltz in the other.  In both, Adams has a painting of a girl with large eyes, but one will note that it is not the same painting across the two images. Burton's new movie, which opens on December 25th, is based on the true story of Margaret and Walter Keane, with Adams and Waltz taking on those two roles.  The Keanes met in the 1950s and gained fame due to the paintings of children with large, sad, eyes, which were terribly popular in the '50s and '60s.  Eventually, the marriage fell apart and »

- Josh Lasser

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First Look at Amy Adams in Tim Burton's 'Big Eyes'

4 August 2014 8:02 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

USA Today has our first look at director Tim Burton's Big Eyes, which follows the plight of American artists Margaret and Walter Keane, the husband and wife team responsible for launching the 'Big Eyed' kids trend in the 50s and 60s. Here, we see Amy Adams bringing Margaret to life alongside one of her iconic paintings. And a second photo offers our first look at Christoph Waltz as Walter, who was taken to court over the authorship of his shared work with his wife. Check it out and then read on for more about this intriguing new biopic.

Christoph Waltz, who grew up in Austria, is no stranger to the work of Margaret and Walter Keane. Even in his home country, the paints of these doe-eyed children were omnipresent. He explains:

"I remember the pictures from the 1960s, they were everywhere."

He also wasn't surprised when he heard that »

- MovieWeb

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First Look at Amy Adams in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

4 August 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

Thanks to USA Today we have our first look at Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz in Tim Burton's upcoming film project Big Eyes

The film is based on the true story of Walter Keane (Waltz), "who was one of the most successful painters 1950s and early 1960s. The artist earned staggering notoriety by revolutionizing the commercialization and accessibility of popular art with his enigmatic paintings of waifs with big eyes. The truth would eventually be discovered though: Keane's were actually not created by him at all, but by his wife, Margaret (Adams). The Keanes, it seemed, had been living a lie that had grown to gigantic proportions."

Waltz said in an interview:

I remember the pictures from the 1960s, they were everywhere. We train ourselves to look for drama, to go for conflict because those are the stories worth telling. It would be expected that this (situation) too would be something extraordinary. »

- Joey Paur

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First look at Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz in Tim Burton’s Big Eyes

4 August 2014 5:14 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Thanks to USA Today, we’ve got our first look at Amy Adams (Man of Steel) and Christoph Waltz (Django Unchained) as artists Margaret and Walter Keane in Tim Burton’s upcoming drama Big Eyes

Big Eyes follows the husband-and-wife team from their first meeting in the 1950s through to their success in the 1960s, when Walter began taking credit for Margaret’s paintings of children with large eyes, leading to a long-running feud between the two that culminated with a court case in the 1980s.

Big Eyes is set for release in the States on December 25th, with a cast that also includes Jason Schwartzman (Moonrise Kingdom), Danny Huston (Hitchcock), Terence Stamp (The Art of the Steal) and Krysten Ritter (Breaking Bad).

The post First look at Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz in Tim Burton’s Big Eyes appeared first on Flickering Myth. »

- Gary Collinson

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First Stills Of Amy Adams As Margaret Keane In Tim Burton’s ‘Big Eyes’

4 August 2014 3:15 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

I’m looking forward to this and not just for the masterful Amy Adams but also because we’ll see Tim Burton move over to more ‘traditional’ cinema roots to tell the real-life story of painter Margaret Keane in Big Eyes.

Keane had huge success in the 1950s with her work but in the 1960s her husband, Walter Keane, took credit for her paintings and they then hit immensely difficult times with legal battles that would effect them both in every possible human way. In Tim Burton’s film, Margaret is portrayed by Amy Adams (already rumoured to give another amazing performance), alongside Christoph Waltz playing Walter, the man who tries to take away her talent and we all know he can play calm-to-crazy extremely well.

We also know what Burton can do and I hope, and always believe, that this move away from the more obscure might be a »

- Dan Bullock

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Hercules review

23 July 2014 12:39 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Dwayne Johnson takes on the role of a club-wielding demigod in Brett Ratner’s Hercules. What’s not to like? Here’s Ryan’s review...

In Hercules, Dwayne Johnson wears a lion’s head as a hat. That probably tells you a lot about the tone of director Brett Ratner’s larger-than-life sword-and-sandals adventure. Based on Steve Moore’s comic book of the same name, Hercules re-imagines the hero of classical legend as a flesh-and-blood mercenary struggling to live up to the weight of his own myth.

Surrounded by a misfit group of fellow warriors-for-hire, Dwayne Johnson’s Hercules is the ultimate working class hero, even if he is meant to be the son of Zeus: he leads from the front, and wades into action while the noblemen he works for stand around in their purple cloaks, chatting and eating freshly-peeled grapes.

Like videogame characters, Hercules’ crew each has a »

- ryanlambie

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‘The Art of the Steal’ Review

19 June 2014 4:21 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Kurt Russell, Matt Dillon, Jay Baruchel, Chris Diamantopoulos, Katheryn Winnick, Kenneth Welsh, Jason Jones, Terence Stamp | Written and Directed by Jonathan Sobol

I love a good heist (or caper) movie, of course as do many others out there, just look at the success of the “Oceans” franchise and the recent Now You See Me but my love does not end at the mainstream, I really love discovering hidden gems of the genre – films like Flypaper, How to Rob a Bank and The Perfect Score – so when I saw The Art of the Steal pop up on Amazon.com I knew it was a film I had to check out. Even more so considering it stars the legend that is Kurt Russell alongside the always awesome Jay Baruchel. So, thinking this is the type of under-the-radar flick that I’d dig (and that wouldn’t see the light of day »

- Phil Wheat

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The Art of the Steal review: Kurt Russell's disappointing con caper

18 June 2014 6:45 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director: Jonathan Sobol; Screenwriter: Jonathan Sobol; Starring: Kurt Russell, Jay Baruchel, Katheryn Winnick, Matt Dillon, Terence Stamp; Running time: 90 mins; Certificate: 15

The stakes are always high in a con caper where the final revelation can either pay off handsomely, or leave everyone feeling cheated. In this case, Kurt Russell and Matt Dillon are short-changed by a script with a clever denouement that comes at the expense of the rest of the action, which is so self-consciously cool and vacuous, it's practically freeze-dried.

Russell provides the one heartfelt performance as Crunch Calhoun, the wheelman in a heist (badly) organised with half-brother Nicky (Matt Dillon), a too-slick grifter who lands Crunch in a Polish prison to save his own skin when the scam goes pear-shaped. Writer/director Jonathan Sobol cuts to chase straight away, showing off a flair for action while speedily looping around the gaps in logic. Occasionally he'll freeze the »

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Movie Review – The Art of the Steal (2013)

17 June 2014 5:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

The Art of the Steal, 2013.

Directed by Jonathan Sobol.

Starring Kurt Russell, Matt Dillon, Jay Baruchel, Kenneth Welsh and Chris Diamantopoulos.

Synopsis:

Released after seven years in a Polish prison having been double-crossed by his half-brother Nicky, stunt rider and art thief Crunch Calhoun is tempted back into the game for one final heist that could set him and his old crew up for life.

On the basis of the synopsis alone this is the type of film many people would run long and hard to avoid. Given the nation’s propensity for obesity and, we’re told, diabetes on an epic scale, Brits running at all seems so unlikely as to prove just how high the bar is for yet another movie of just-one-final-job capering.

Never read other reviews before writing your own, we’re told, and though I didn’t it wasn’t easy to avoid the general »

- Gary Collinson

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Borgman | Review

13 June 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

White Child Above the Clouds: Warmerdam’s Dark Classist Comedy a Winner

Alex van Warmerdam’s Borgman has to be the steadily working director’s most accomplished work to date. Known mostly for his droll, sometimes perverse films dealing with families or communities tested by strange situations that range anywhere from a maintained weirdness to potential violence, his latest treat is poised to broaden his appeal to a larger audience. His 1992 film, The Northerners, perhaps his most celebrated film, deals with a group of people living in a 1960’s housing development, while 2003’s Grimm is an off kilter retelling of Hansel and Gretel. Warmerdam’s latest, which also seems to have roots in the fairy tale parable, plays like the strange, neglected cousin to a host of other considerable cinematic references, and yet, it’s a delectable concoction all its own. Incredibly, often wickedly funny, it’s filled with memorable moments, »

- Nicholas Bell

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Cannes award to legendary Vilmos Zsigmond

27 May 2014 4:31 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

We here at Tfh have always thought of the great Vilmos Zsigmond as one of "our" movie icons, having begun his distinguished cinematographic career in the humble swamps of low budget exploitation before rising on his own merit to a justly celebrated mainstream career. So it is with fond memories of the likes of The Sadist, The Name of the Game is Kill, The Time Travelers and Five Bloody Graves that we congratulate him on this latest award: From The Daily News - The legendary Hungarian-American cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond, director of photography of the soon-to-be-released film ‘Atatürk,’ will receive a Life Time Achievement Award today from the 67th Cannes International Film Festival 2014. 

In an extraordinary, Academy Award-winning career spanning some six decades, Zsigmond’s outstanding credits include “The Deer Hunter” and “Heaven’s Gate” directed by Michael Cimino, “Close Encounters Of The Third Kind” and “Sugarland Express” by Steven Spielberg, »

- TFH Team

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‘Alien Nation’: The Return: Again?

13 May 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The original movie felt like the pilot for a TV series but the ensuing small screen version became a casualty of studio financing. Now with the concept of inter-species relations everywhere in franchises such as X-men, Fox are banking on another attempt to revive Alien Nation. The 1988 introduction saw James Caan and a heavily made-up Mandy Patinkin (Homeland) as a mismatched pair of cops, one of whom just happened to be from a race of recently-integrated extraterrestrials. Featuring Terence Stamp as the villain, it was a crime thriller with a sci-fi twist that certainly felt fresh back then but was perhaps a little ahead of its time for audiences to get on board.

Alien Nation the series (co-created by V‘s Kenneth Johnson with the film’s scribe Rockne S.O’Bannon) lasted one season in 1989, though the storyline was picked up in telemovies and novels. The single outing was »

- Steve Palace

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 60 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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