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Terence Stamp Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (3) | Trivia (12) | Personal Quotes (10)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 22 July 1938Stepney, London, England, UK
Birth NameTerence Henry Stamp
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Terence Henry Stamp was born and lived in Canal Road, Bow, until German bombers forced his family to move to Plaistow. An icon of the 1960s, he dated the likes of Julie Christie, Brigitte Bardot and Jean Shrimpton. After an extremely successful early career, starring in Modesty Blaise (1966), Poor Cow (1967) and Far from the Madding Crowd (1967), Stamp withdrew from mainstream films after his girlfriend, supermodel Jean Shrimpton, left him, and he and went on a 10-year sabbatical in India. He returned home in the late 1970s to star as the evil General Zod in Superman II (1980), and in 1984, delivered what many consider his finest performance as the supergrass in Stephen Frears' The Hit (1984). A few minor but colourful roles, topped by his performance as the transsexual Bernadette in The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994), have put Stamp back in the British conscious. His role of a vengeful gangster in The Limey (1999) was created especially for him by its director.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: The Madcap Laughs and Tonto

Spouse (1)

Elizabeth O'Rourke (31 December 2002 - 29 April 2008) (divorced)

Trade Mark (3)

Rich smooth voice
Often plays sinister villains
Calm reserved performances

Trivia (12)

Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#59) (1995).
Stamp has been wheat and dairy intolerant since the 1960s and launched "The Stamp Collection" range of organic wheat and dairy free products in 1994.
A publicity shot from The Collector (1965) showing Stamp holding a chloroform pad was used for the cover of The Smiths single "What Difference Does It Make." After some copies were printed, Stamp decided he did not want his photo to be used, and the rest of the copies appeared with Morrissey in the exact same pose, looking very much like him but holding a glass of milk instead. Later, Stamp relented and his photo was reinstated on the 12-inch single cover.
Older brother of Christopher Stamp.
Went from playing Superman's adversary (General Zod in Superman II (1980)) to playing Superman's most loving parent (the voice of Jor-El on Smallville (2001)).
Trained at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, whose alumni include Elizabeth Knowelden, Hugh Bonneville, Julia Ormond, Rupert Friend, Angela Lansbury, Matthew Goode, Sue Johnston, Minnie Driver and Julian Fellowes.
Was originally considered for the role of John Ryder in The Hitcher (1986), which went to Rutger Hauer.
Was listed as a potential nominee on the 2006 Razzie Award nominating ballot. He was listed as a suggestion in the Worst Supporting Actor category for his performance in the film Elektra (2005). However, he failed to receive a nomination.
Turned down the title role in Alfie (1966) and suggested that they cast his roommate Michael Caine. Caine got the part, for which he received his first Oscar nomination. (Source: Robert Osborne on TCM 1/31/10).
Both he and his The Company of Wolves (1984) co-star David Warner have played Jor-El, the biological Kryptonian father of Superman. He provided the character's voice in Smallville (2001) whereas Warner played the role in Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman (1993).
Has provided the voice of God in "The Word of Promise", an audio dramatization of the New King James Version of the Bible.
Celebrity spokesperson for Foster Grant sunglasses during the 1960s.

Personal Quotes (10)

I would have liked to be James Bond.
[on death] Few people understand it and live when it comes.
[on declining to appear in the second and third Star Wars prequels] Actors prefer to work with actors.
A lot of newspapers say Terence Stamp is playing himself and we're as bored as he is.
A lot of people only see me as a villain.
All actors are incredibly insecure.
As a boy, I believed I could make myself invisible. I'm not sure I ever could, but I certainly had the ability to pass unnoticed.
My favorite film is Gene Tierney and Tyrone Power in The Razor's Edge (1946).
[on Man of Steel (2013)] When I heard they were remaking it, or they were doing a version of it, I was kind of sad in a way. Superman (1978) was the benchmark for all of these comic book movies. There's never been anything quite as good as those Dick Donner movies. Since then, big movies have become computer generated. They've become unemotional, and so I was sad. I thought it would be diluted, in other words.
[on Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (1999)] He may be a great visionary, [George] Lucas, and he may be great with toys and effects and stuff, but he doesn't really strike me as someone who was really interested in acting.

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