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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1992

1-20 of 163 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Variety Critics Debate the Best and Worst of Cannes 2015

13 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Peter Debruge: Well, I didn’t see that coming. In what feels like a twist ending — one that leaves me feeling a bit like Tim Roth at the end of “Chronic” — the Cannes jury has awarded the Palme d’Or to “Dheepan,” a movie that lags among my least favorites in the competition, and the weakest in Jacques Audiard’s filmography.

People have been throwing the word “weak” around a lot this week, grousing that the official selection doesn’t measure up to that of previous years. I defer to you, Scott and Justin, since you’ve each been attending Cannes for longer than I have (this is only my fifth time on the Croisette), but if there’s one thing I’ve learned in my time here, it’s that Cannes critics always like to complain that the present year’s crop feels meager by comparison to past editions, »

- Peter Debruge, Scott Foundas and Justin Chang

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'Carol,' 'Inside Out' and 10 other Cannes 2015 films ready for Oscar's closeup

19 hours ago | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Cannes — Awards season is no stranger to Cannes. From "Amour" to "The Tree of Life" to "No Country For Old Men" to "The Pianist" to "The Piano," every year there seems to be a player or two that pokes its head out from the crowded Croisette and into Oscar's waiting arms. This year's potential players may not include a true Best Picture contender, but they are evidence enough that the festival's presence will be felt throughout the upcoming campaign. Before you start second guessing which films have a shot and which don't, remember the actions of this year's Hollywood-influenced competition jury. The Coen brothers, Jake Gyllenhaal, Sienna Miller and the Guillermo Del Toro, among others, awarded some interesting prizes that will absolutely affect the race. The critical kudos are important, too (as are those of us who cover the beat on a regular basis and took in this year's slate »

- Gregory Ellwood

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Cannes 2015 jury tried to "balance out" awards

24 May 2015 3:15 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Co-president Ethan Coen said the jury tried to “balance out” the awards while Jake Gyllenhaal addresses “controlled suicide”.

The Competition jury of the 68th Cannes Film Festival have spoken out after awarding the Palme d’Or to Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan and a host of other prizes.

Click here for full list of winners

The jury, made up of actors, filmmakers and a musican, was led by co-presidents Joel and Ethan Cohen.

Speaking at a press conference after the ceremony, Joel said of their approach to judging the 19 Competition titles: “We are not a jury of film critics - we are artists looking at work and deciding what to celebrate in each of the works.”

Ethan said: “We couldn’t give a top prize to every movie - but we did try to balance out the attention on each of the films.”

Joel added: “We would have given more films multiple prizes but those are the rules »

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Cannes 2015 jury reflect on their decisions

24 May 2015 3:15 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Co-president Ethan Coen said the jury tried to “balance out” the awards while Jake Gyllenhaal addresses “controlled suicide”.

The Competition jury of the 68th Cannes Film Festival have spoken out after awarding the Palme d’Or to Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan and a host of other prizes.

Click here for full list of winners

The jury, made up of actors, filmmakers and a musican, was led by co-presidents Joel and Ethan Cohen.

Speaking at a press conference after the ceremony, Joel said of their approach to judging the 19 Competition titles: “We are not a jury of film critics - we are artists looking at work and deciding what to celebrate in each of the works.”

Ethan said: “We couldn’t give a top prize to every movie - but we did try to balance out the attention on each of the films.”

Joel added: “We would have given more films multiple prizes but those are the rules »

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Cannes: Jacques Audiard's 'Dheepan' wins Palme d'Or

24 May 2015 11:14 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Other winners include Son Of Saul, The Assassin, Chronic, The Lobster, The Measure Of A Man, Carol and Mon Roi.Scroll down for full list of winners

Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan has won the Palme d’Or at the 68th Cannes Film Festival (May 13-24).

Review: Dheepan

Critics had predicted that Todd HaynesCarol or Hou Hsiao-hsien’s The Assassin would take the top prize, while momentum appeared to shift to Laszlo Nemes’ Son Of Saul when it picked up the Fipresci prize. Even the bookies favoured a different title, pegging Yorgos LanthimosThe Lobster for the prestigious honour.

But while they each left the Lumiere Theatre with one prize apiece, it was Dheepan that claimed the top honour.

The drama centres on a Tamil freedom fighter (Antonythasan Jesuthasan, one of three non-professional Tamil leads) who, near the end of the Sri Lankan Civil War, flees to Europe with a makeshift family hoping to claim asylum »

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Live: Cannes Film Festival 2015 winners

24 May 2015 11:14 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Screen is reporting live from the Closing Ceremony of the 68th Cannes Film Festival, including quotes from the red carpet.

Refresh this page for the latest updates (Grand Prix has been announced… nearly at the big one)

After 12 days of world premieres and red carpets, the winners of the 68th Cannes Film Festival are being revealed inside the Lumière Theatre.

Opinion from Screen’s jury of critics gave close to top marks to both Todd HaynesCarol, starring Cate Blanchett, and Hou Hsiao-hsien’s period Chinese drama The Assassin, while Gus Van Sant’s The Sea of Trees, starring Matthew McConaughey, scored a 12-year low.

But it is the jury chaired by Us filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen that will decide who takes home the prestigous Palme d’Or.

Despite Yorgos LanthimosThe Lobster being the bookies favourite to take the top prize, it was Hungarian Holocaust drama Son Of Saul that picked up the Fipresci »

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Cannes: ‘Son of Saul’ Wins Grand Prix

24 May 2015 10:21 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — The jury of the 68th annual Cannes Film Festival handed out its awards on Sunday night.

Taiwanese auteur Hou Hsiao-hsien received the festival’s director prize for “The Assassin,” a visually dazzling martial-arts epic set in ninth-century China.

The actress prize was awarded, in a tie victory, to Rooney Mara for her performance as a 1950s shopgirl in Todd Haynes’ lesbian love story, “Carol,” and to Emmanuelle Bercot for her turn as a Frenchwoman in an emotionally destructive relationship in Maiwenn’s “Mon roi.” One of the most prominent faces of the 2015 festival, having directed the opening-night film, “Standing Tall,” Bercot gave an effusive speech during which juror Xavier Dolan could be seen brushing away tears.

Haynes accepted on behalf of Mara, who had already returned to New York from the festival. “She would be so completely blown away by this prize,” he said. “I’m just so proud of her work, »

- Justin Chang

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Chronic Review | Cannes 2015

24 May 2015 9:41 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

The applause at the end of the screening for Chronic arrived with a slight delay. Everyone seemed to be taken aback by the sudden, predictable, yet at the same time unexpected, ending. In this evocative film where silence speaks more than words, Mexican director Michel Franco paints a bleak study of man. It is quite straightforward: a nurse tends to his patients then goes on with his banal day-to-day activities. Yet there is more complexity as the story gradually unfolds. The film opens with the protagonist bathing a young woman, seated in the shower looking immobile, sad, underweight, too weakened by illness to even complete a simple movement. She is so weak that when he later tends to her body, we wonder whether she is dead. [caption id="attachment_463381" align="alignright" width="350"] Image via Cannes[/caption] It is painful to watch these terminally ill patients, their quotidian a terrifying reminder of our own fragility and mortality. »

- Talia Soghomonian

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Cannes: Will ‘The Assassin’ Slay the Competition?

23 May 2015 5:28 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Given the number of films in competition (19), the correspondingly infinite number of possible award/talent configurations, and the sheer impossibility of guessing at the individual and collective tastes of nine jurors, predicting the major award winners at the Cannes Film Festival is obviously a fool’s errand — and one that our critics on the Croisette have gladly undertaken.

Guy Lodge

Palme d’Or: “The Assassin.” Word on the street — and among British bookies — is that my own favorite film of the fest, Yorgos Lanthimos’ high-wire relationship fantasy “The Lobster,” is the one to beat, though whether that’s based on honest hearsay or a projection of the Coen brothers’ taste for dryer-than-dust comedy, I can’t say. As much as it would thrill me to see such a singular combination of concept-y formalism and perverse heart-tugging take the prize, I have a hard time seeing it as the unifying consensus »

- Guy Lodge and Justin Chang

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Cannes Review: 'After Lucia' Director Michel Franco's English-Language Debut 'Chronic' Starring Tim Roth & Sarah Sutherland

23 May 2015 2:00 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

In the 1980s and 1990s, Tim Roth was one of the most exciting of a new generation of British actors. He worked with everyone from Robert Altman to Mike Leigh before playing Mr. Orange in Quentin Tarantino's breakout "Reservoir Dogs," which brought him to the attention of an even wider audience, landing him parts in everything from major blockbusters to auteurist pictures like James Gray's "Little Odessa." Things have been more mixed recently: Roth moved into U.S. TV for the procedural show "Lie To Me," and has struggled to book the right kind of roles since it ended, with disasters like last year's Cannes opener "Grace Of Monaco" and the unintentionally hilarious FIFA movie "United Passions" on his recent résumé. But with a reunion with Tarantino coming up in "The Hateful Eight," and with his leading role in the first English-language film from Mexican director Michel Franco »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Daily | Cannes 2015 | Michel Franco’s Chronic

23 May 2015 5:08 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

"Mexican provocateur Michel Franco is a filmmaker of cool-blooded precision and intelligence," writes Guy Lodge in his review of Chronic for Time Out. "Yet filmgoers outside festivals largely haven't had a chance to see him at his best: After Lucia, a heart-stopping cautionary tale against extreme teen bullying, won a prize at Cannes in 2013, yet was sent straight to DVD in Britain. The presence of Tim Roth in Franco's English-language, Los Angeles-set follow-up may seem a notional gesture to the mainstream, but compromises are few and far between in this tough-minded character study." We've got clips and we're collecting reviews. » - David Hudson »

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Cannes 2015: deals round-up

22 May 2015 2:23 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The biggest deals of this year’s Cannes Marché du Film and how the Competition titles sold throughout the festival.

Behind the glamour of this year’s Cannes Film Festival, business was booming at the Marché du Film (May 13-22), with representatives from 120 countries in attendance - up four on 2014.

A total 3,300 films were on offer this year, around 1,000 at the project stage, with an estimated 11,000 film professionals in attendance, in line with last year.

In the opening days, Marché chief Jérôme Paillard told Screen: “Acquisition agents are telling me that it’s the first time in a number of years that there are so many big projects. I’ve been told there are around 50 high profile projects on offer.”

North AmericaHOT Projects

Universal Pictures and Focus Features took worldwide rights to Tom Ford’s upcoming thriller Nocturnal Animals, starring Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal, in a deal reportedly worth $20m. [Story]

Open Road paid »

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2015 Cannes Critics’ Panel Day 10: Pulling the Plug on Michel Franco’s “Chronic”

22 May 2015 12:00 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

It’s a Tim Roth lead Un Certain Regard jury that awarded Michel Franco with the highest honor of the section. Michel Franco has moved up the Croisette, debuting his Daniel and Ana in the Directors’ Fortnight section in 2009, and the Ucr in 2012 with the equally disturbing After, Lucia. Naturally landing an In Comp spot, Chronic fittingly tapped Roth to play the caretaker protag in the Mexican filmmaker’s fourth feature. As our Nicholas Bell mentioned in his review, “Franco’s bleak predilection for misanthropy shows no signs of waning,” and my guess is that the oft-mentioned comparisons to Haneke made this too jarring of a portrait at the tale end of the fest.

Check back tomorrow for our final grades. Click on the grid below for a larger version.

 

 

  »

- Eric Lavallee

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Chronic | 2015 Cannes Film Festival Review

22 May 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Prognosis Negative: Franco’s English Language Dance with Death

After winning the Un Certain Regard Award for his 2012 sophomore feature After Lucia, Mexican director Michel Franco is back with more uncomfortable human interactions, but this time in English with Chronic. Compared to previous efforts, including the 2009 debut Daniel y Ana which deals with a singular episode, Franco spreads his disdain over the shattered lives of those grappling with advanced stages of chronic illnesses. Connected by a hospice care nurse as our main protagonist, a disturbed man with his own deep secrets, Franco downplays the usual streak of revulsion we’ve become accustomed to for more familiar profundities.

David (Tim Roth) is currently caring for a frail patient who looks as if she’s wasting away before our eyes. We see him working with her, efficient, patient, and caring. Several scenes later, we’re at her funeral, which David attends, though »

- Nicholas Bell

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Cannes 2015: 'Chronic' review

22 May 2015 8:18 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆ Following his brutal depiction of high school bullying in After Lucia (2012), Mexican director Michel Franco returns to Cannes in competition with Chronic (2015), a slowburning drama about a committed nurse caring for terminally ill patients. In one of the best performances of recent years, Tim Roth stars as David, the palliative care nurse who takes his duties very seriously and perhaps oversteps the bounds. Franco's style favours the long drawn out take, the stillness of waiting for something to happen, his camera moving infrequently. And this austerity serves the subject as David himself carefully moves and manipulates his patients for their comfort and ease.

»

- CineVue UK

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Chronic’

22 May 2015 5:35 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The smallest and subtlest film in the main competition at Cannes this year, Mexican director Michel Franco’s “Chronic” offers a measured portrait of a hospice nurse (played by Tim Roth) who tends to terminally ill patients, respectfully observing his difficult and emotionally draining job while bluntly asking the question: Who cares for the caregiver? Echoing Michael Haneke’s “Amour” in key aspects of style and theme without achieving nearly the devastating impact of that Palme d’Or winner, Franco shifts the emotional center of his film away from the bond between a dying woman and her closest loved one, zeroing in on the uncomfortable truth that, in many cases, the people who connect most closely to such patients in their final days are not immediate family members, but their nurses. Needless to say, the subject is anti-commercial in the extreme, and the approach even more so, relegating this sensitive portrait primarily to festivals. »

- Peter Debruge

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'Chronic': Cannes Review

22 May 2015 5:04 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Any comment on the total commitment of Tim Roth's performance as a palliative care worker in Chronic seems inadequate to describe the intense degree to which the actor loses himself in the punishing life of a man whose dedication to his job stems directly from the scars of personal devastation. To describe this first English-language feature from Michel Franco as bleak is a similar understatement. While it's tough to figure what audience exists beyond festivals for this uncompromising study in grief, pain, terminal care and dying, admiration for the Mexican writer-director's formal rigor in the service of hard-

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- David Rooney

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Cannes: Other Angle Rolls Out ‘Lives,‘ ‘Blind Date’

20 May 2015 10:50 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes – Paris-based Other Angle Pictures, one of France’s most mainstream sales agents, has closed multiple deals, major territories included, on its flagship Cannes titles “Lives in Secret” and “Blind Date.”

Starring Tim Roth and Kelly Reilly (“True Detective”) and produced by Eliot Jenkins and “Resident Evil’s” Jeremy Bolt, “Lives” has closed Australia (Vendetta) and Latin America (Cdc), of major territories. Directed by Emmy winner John Hay (“Stig of the Dump,” “There’s Only One Jimmy Grimble”), “Lives” also clinched Turkey (Fabula), South Africa (MNet), Poland (Kino Swiat), Middle East (Falcon) and the former Yugoslavia (21 Films). The U.K., France, Belgium and Japan are in advanced talks, said Oliver Albou, who heads up Other Angle with Laurence Schonberg.

Based on true events, “Lives” centers on WWII British intelligence officer Vera Atkins’ interrogation of her Gestapo counterpart over the fate of women spies sent to Occupied France. It is early »

- John Hopewell

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Other Angle seals 'Lives In Secret' deals

20 May 2015 6:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: WWII spy mistress drama to star Kelly Reilly and Tim Roth launched in Cannes

French sales company Other Angle Pictures has secured a raft of pre-sales on John Hay’s upcoming post-wwii spy drama Lives In Secret, starring Kelly Reilly and Tim Roth.

“We’re very happy with this market in terms of the deals we’ve done and the great reception we had for our new and upcoming projects,” commented company MD Olivier Albou.

Lives In Secret has sold to Australia (Vendetta Films), South Africa (M-Net), Latin America (Cdc United Network), Middle East (Falcon) and ex-Yugoslavia (2i Films) and is in advance talks for the UK, France, Belgium and Japan.

Adapted from Sarah Helm’s A Life In Secrets, the film tells the true story of Vera Atkins, a British intelligence officer who trained and dispatched hundreds of agents to Occupied France.

After the war, Atkins made it her personal mission to ascertain the fate »

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Kelly Reilly, Tim Roth sign up for 'Lives in Secret'

16 May 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive:Kelly Reilly and Tim Roth have signed to co-star in John Hay’s thriller Lives in Secret, inspired by the true story of Second World War spy-mistress Vera Atkins.

Paris-based Other Angle is launching the project, formerly titled Night and Fog, in Cannes.

Lives in Secret is due to start shorting in the northern English region of Yorkshire in August. It is produced by Jeremy Bolt (Resident Evil).

Adapted from Sarah Helm’s A Life in Secrets, the film tells the true story of Atkins, a British intelligence who trained and dispatched hundreds of agents to Occupied France.

After the war, Atkins made it her personal mission to ascertain the fate of all the female agents she lost. The film revolves around her interrogation of Gestapo officer Hans Kieffer about what happened to a young Muslim spy. »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1992

1-20 of 163 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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