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Jeremy Northam Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (5) | Personal Quotes (3)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 1 December 1961Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England, UK
Birth NameJeremy Philip Northam
Nickname Jer
Height 6' 2" (1.88 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Jeremy Philip Northam was born in Cambridge, England to parents John and Rachel, both university professors. John Northam is best known for his translations of Henrik Ibsen. The family moved to Bristol, in 1972, where Jeremy attended Bristol Grammar School. Jeremy graduated from Bedford College, University of London, in 1984 with a bachelor of arts degree in English Literature. After graduation, he attended the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School and worked his way through regional theater to the London stage. Northam was the recipient of the prestigious Laurence Olivier Award - the British equivalent of the Tony - for outstanding newcomer, for his 1990 performance as "Edward Voysey", the moral pivot of the Royal National Theatre revival of the 1905 play, "The Voysey Inheritance". In 1994, he made his American film debut in the thriller, The Net (1995), with Sandra Bullock, followed by his beloved portrayal of "Mr. Knightley" in Miramax's Emma (1996), starring opposite Gwyneth Paltrow. Northam has continued to thrill his audiences with his many acclaimed performances, which include big budget productions, smart, independent projects and even television and audio books.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: <lwollich@aol.com>

Spouse (1)

Liz Moro (April 2005 - 2009?) (divorced)

Trivia (5)

While playing the small role of "Osric" and understudying the title role in a 1989 production of "Hamlet", Jeremy replaced star Daniel Day-Lewis when the actor had a total breakdown in mid-performance.
He was awarded the Laurence Olivier Theatre Award in 1990 (1989 season) for Most Promising Newcomer for his performance in "The Voysey Inheritance".
He has two older brothers, Christopher and Tim, and an older sister, Kate. Through them he has 10 nieces and nephews, plus some great nieces and nephews.
Has a flat in Marylebone and formerly owned a house three miles from the coast in Norfolk, where he liked to cook fish.
Majored in English at London University, and trained at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School.

Personal Quotes (3)

All the great novels, all the great films, all the great dramas are fictions that actually tell us the truth about us or about human nature or about human situations without being tied into the minutia of documentary events. Otherwise we might as well just make documentaries.
Surely the job of fiction is to actually tell the truth. It's a paradox that's at the heart of any kind of storytelling.
I'd always liked the idea that drama acts at its best as a kind of arena for debate. Not just about the thing itself, but also producing aesthetic, stylistic, political and moral discussions.

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