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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

15 items from 2017


Crowd-Pleasing Hits Pepper Walk of Fame Honoree Brett Ratner’s Resume

19 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Brett Ratner’s rise through the directorial ranks as a helmer of consistent studio hits was swift and immediate. A veteran of the music-video world, his feature debut, “Money Talks,” became a low-budget success in late summer 1997, and would cement his strong relationship with actor-comedian Chris Tucker.

Chris helped me get my job on ‘Money Talks,’ ” Ratner says. “When the original director left the project, Chris apparently said to the producers that he knew this ‘cool white boy named Brett Ratner’ and that’s how it happened. I knew I could work with Chris and that it would be a lot of fun. ‘Money Talks’ made sense because I had come out of music videos, and it fit with what I had learned. It happened very fast. I was 26 when I got ‘Money Talks,’ and I’d done over 100 music videos, but back then, you had to do commercials and »

- Nick Clement

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Ryan Reynolds (‘Deadpool’)

17 January 2017 5:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Ryan Reynolds (Courtesy: Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“The movie is groundbreaking in a lot of ways,” asserts Ryan Reynolds of Deadpool, the blockbuster comic book adaptation released last February that he produced and stars in, as we sit down at the offices of The Hollywood Reporter to record an episode of the Awards Chatter podcast. “It usurps certain tropes of the superhero genre that were well-ready to be usurped. And, again, timing, timing, timing, you know? We were kind of at peak superhero, in terms of tone, and it just offered something completely different in that respect. It also had just an unabashed commitment to its R rating. As I look back — and hindsight is obviously 20/20, but — it knew what it was, and I always knew what it was. I knew exactly how to play this guy [the irreverent title character], and I felt, in some weird way — not to »

- Carson Blackwelder

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Vince Vaughn (‘Hacksaw Ridge’)

15 January 2017 4:00 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Vince Vaughn (Courtesy: AP Images)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“I think what happened to me after The Break-Up was I was kind of more ‘booking jobs’ and not working from that same catalyst of, ‘I really believe in this and we all want to make the same movie,'” acknowledges the actor Vince Vaughn as we sit down at the London West Hollywood hotel to discuss his career on The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. Following a remarkable run of hit comedies in the early 2000s — among them, 2003’s Old School, 2004’s Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story and Starsky & Hutch and 2005’s Wedding Crashers — Vaughn had deliberately pivoted towards drama with the 2006 dramedy.

“But I didn’t follow through on it,” the 46-year-old says with unmistakable regret. Instead, he lost his way for a decade, during which he was humbled by critical and commercial disappointments — see Fred Claus »

- Carson Blackwelder

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Viggo Mortensen (‘Captain Fantastic’)

12 January 2017 4:00 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Viggo Mortensen (Courtesy: Mar del Plata Film Festival)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“It’s very unusual, first of all, to find an original story, a screenplay, as well written as Captain Fantastic,” says that film’s lead actor Viggo Mortensen as we sit down at the offices of The Hollywood Reporter to record an episode of THR‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. “It’s even more unusual for the movie to be as good as that script. And it’s even more unusual for that movie to be supported and be around and have such good word-of-mouth and for that to mean something months and months later. It’s very unusual. I’ve been around long enough to see that that doesn’t usually happen, so I’m very happy about that.”

Mortensen, 58, who is best known for playing Aragorn in the blockbuster Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001- »

- Carson Blackwelder

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From Split to Psycho: why cinema fails dissociative identity disorder

12 January 2017 8:01 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

M Night Shyamalan’s new movie, Split, stars James McAvoy as a character with 23 different personalities. And, like most screen portrayals of the disorder, it is seen as dangerous and violent. But what’s the truth behind the stigma?

Tom Hanks played six different characters in Cloud Atlas, Eddie Murphy played seven in The Nutty Professor and Alec Guinness notched up eight in Kind Hearts and Coronets. But James McAvoy sets a new benchmark with his new movie, Split. He plays Kevin, a man with at least 23 distinct personalities – not all of them nice. This presents extra challenges for the young women Kevin has abducted and locked in his basement. Every time he walks into the cell, they have to work out who they are dealing with. Is it “Dennis”, the frowny, buttoned-up neat-freak? Is it “Patricia”, the prim, English-accented governess? Could it be “Hedwig”, the nine-year-old Kanye West fan? »

- Steve Rose

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Burt Bacharach (‘Po’)

11 January 2017 6:30 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Burt Bacharach (Courtesy: Michael Kovac/FilmMagic)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“It’s sort of what I’m supposed to do,” says the legendary songwriter/composer Burt Bacharach — a man who has written the music for 48 Top 10 hits, including nine that reached the top of the charts, and who has won eight Grammys, three Oscars and the Library of Congress’ 2011 Gershwin Prize for Popular Song — as we sit down in his Pacific Palisades piano room to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast, and I ask him what keeps him working at the age of 88. “Sometimes I have to force it,” he admits. “But it’s what I’ve done. Even if I don’t write anything any good, just let me keep my fingers wet.”

Bacharach certainly has kept his fingers wet, of late: in 2016, for John Asher’s Po, an indie drama about »

- Carson Blackwelder

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Denzel Washington Interview: The Director Reveals How He Opened Up ‘Fences’

11 January 2017 8:56 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Ever since I first met Denzel Washington on the set of Spike Lee’s “Malcolm X,” I’ve felt comfortable with him. Maybe it’s because he and my mother grew up in the same working-class New York suburb, Mount Vernon. Fact is, I grew up in the film industry with Washington, along with Mel Gibson, Debra Winger, Bruce Willis, Kevin Costner, and John Travolta; we’re all close to the same age.

I know the way he swings his tall body into that loping, cocky walk. And it’s fun to watch him, in the green room at the Writers Guild, enthusiastically wave his hands around when he talks about directing. He’s in a good mood: His August Wilson film adaptation of “Fences” has been enthusiastically received, by critics, audiences and — perhaps most crucially for its Oscar chances — actors, landing the coveted SAG Ensemble nomination.

In his third directorial outing (“The Debaters, »

- Anne Thompson

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Denzel Washington Interview: The Director Reveals How He Opened Up ‘Fences’

11 January 2017 8:56 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ever since I first met Denzel Washington on the set of Spike Lee’s “Malcolm X,” I’ve felt comfortable with him. Maybe it’s because he and my mother grew up in the same working-class New York suburb, Mount Vernon. Fact is, I grew up in the film industry with Washington, along with Mel Gibson, Debra Winger, Bruce Willis, Kevin Costner, and John Travolta; we’re all close to the same age.

I know the way he swings his tall body into that loping, cocky walk. And it’s fun to watch him, in the green room at the Writers Guild, enthusiastically wave his hands around when he talks about directing. He’s in a good mood: His August Wilson film adaptation of “Fences” has been enthusiastically received, by critics, audiences and — perhaps most crucially for its Oscar chances — actors, landing the coveted SAG Ensemble nomination.

In his third directorial outing (“The Debaters, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — J. Ralph (‘Jim: The James Foley Story’)

10 January 2017 2:30 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

J. Ralph (Courtesy: Mark Abrahams)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“They’re all about these giant concepts — climate change, the war, autism, species extinction, globalization, one after the next,” says songwriter/composer J. Ralph of the documentaries to which he has contributed music over the years, as we sit down at his Malibu home to record an episode of THR‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. They have included several films that won the best documentary feature Oscar (2008’s Man on Wireand 2009’s The Cove) or were nominated for it (2012’s Hell and Back Again and 2014’s Virunga). However, 2016’s Jim: The James Foley Story, the most recent doc to which he lent his talents, is different. “This one was about one person,” he notes, namely the eponymous freelance American war correspondent who, in 2014, was killed in Syria while trying to bring attention to the humanitarian crisis occurring there. “I wanted »

- Carson Blackwelder

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Oscars 2017: Does Aaron Taylor-Johnson Stand a Chance at Best Supporting Actor After Winning the Golden Globe?

10 January 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Courtesy: Paul Drinkwater/NBCUniversal via Getty Images)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

While last night’s Golden Globes unequivocally belonged to La La Land, it started out with one of the biggest shocks of this awards season: Aaron Taylor-Johnson winning Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture for Nocturnal Animals. Does this surprise upset mean the British thespian is gearing up for winning Best Supporting Actor at the Oscars?

It’s important to first note that even Taylor-Johnson’s Golden Globes nomination wasn’t expected by most awards season prognosticators and, if someone from Tom Ford’s latest flick were to have a shot at the trophy, their money was placed on co-star Michael Shannon. And when it came to winning most had their money on Mahershala Ali (Moonlight), Jeff Bridges (Hell or High Water), Dev Patel (Lion), or even Simon Helberg (Florence Foster Jenkins) — not Taylor-Johnson. »

- Carson Blackwelder

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Twisted Shrek Theory Will Forever Change How You Look at Donkey

7 January 2017 9:27 AM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

There is a certain kind of nostalgia bubbling up for Shrek that often happens with big franchises that hit hard, clean up at the box office, and then turn in a handful of waning sequels. Shrek disappeared for a while, but fans are regaining their Shrek appetite. DreamWorks knows this, and Shrek 5 is currently being planned, though it has never been divulged whether or not it will be a straight sequel or a reboot. Perhaps the studio hasn't discovered this for themselves yet. But one fan has a pretty terrifying theory that makes a lot of sense. While you may forever look at Donkey with a different set of eyes after you hear it, perhaps it could be a good why to go?

We've never gotten to know a lot about Eddie Murphy's Donkey. Especially when it comes to his back story. While the rest of the characters in Shrek, »

- MovieWeb

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Denzel Washington (‘Fences’)

5 January 2017 4:00 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Denzel Washington (Courtesy: Franco Origlia/Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“We’re all actors and we’re here to work” says Denzel Washington when I ask him, as we sit down to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast, if the actor who plays his son in Fences, the new film that he directed and stars in, was intimidated by working with him. The 61-year-old is, of course, a trailblazer for actors of color: An A-list movie star, following in the footsteps of his mentor Sidney Poitier, he became one of the most bankable stars of all time, with a filmography collectively responsible for more than $3.6 billion in worldwide grosses and a consistent track record of excellent work, which has resulted in a Tony and two Oscars. He continues, “There’s no difference. He’s an actor. I’m an actor. I’m »

- Carson Blackwelder

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Michael Keaton (‘The Founder’)

3 January 2017 11:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Michael Keaton (Courtesy: Christopher Polk/Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“It’s a sneaky kind of movie,” says the actor Michael Keaton of his latest, the Ray Kroc biopic The Founder, as we sit down at his office in Santa Monica to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. “You think you’re just gonna see a biopic, and then you realize there are layers to this movie.” Indeed, Kroc, as played by the 65-year-old veteran, becomes, unlike most movie protagonists, less and less sympathetic and likable as the Weinstein Co. release goes along. This is particularly jarring for audiences because, for decades, they have known and loved Keaton — in blockbusters like Beetlejuice and Batman (both made in collaboration with Tim Burton) and in art house darlings like Birdman and Spotlight (the last two best picture Oscar winners). But, once they acclimate to The Founder, »

- Carson Blackwelder

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Andrew Garfield (‘Hacksaw Ridge’ and ‘Silence’)

1 January 2017 11:00 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Andrew Garfield (Courtesy: Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“I like the idea that our greatest wounds are our greatest gifts,” says Andrew Garfield, the 33-year-old U.S.-born British actor currently generating best actor Oscar buzz for his performances in both Mel Gibson‘s Hacksaw Ridge and Martin Scorsese‘s Silence, as we sit down at The Hollywood Reporter to record an episode of the Awards Chatter podcast. “My sensitivity, I think, gets me in so much trouble, and also gives me a tremendous amount of wonderful things in my life, as well. It means that I can connect deeply to things, whether it’s other people, characters I play, the struggles of others. But, in the same breath, it means I can just as easily connect to the stuff that really fucks with me — I’m very permeable in that way.”

(Click above to listen to »

- Carson Blackwelder

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‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Nicole Kidman (‘Lion’)

31 December 2016 5:00 PM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Nicole Kidman (Courtesy: Vincent Sandoval/WireImage)

By: Scott Feinberg

The Hollywood Reporter

“It’s not a business for me,” says the Oscar-winning actress Nicole Kidman as we sit down at The London West Hollywood to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. “I want the films to make money — if they cost a lot of money, I don’t want people to lose — but I’ve got to keep my artistic spirit, and I’ve got to approach it not from a strategic business place, because that just makes me feel not good. So I ask other people to take care of that side of it … but let us make it.”

Born in Honolulu but raised mostly in Australia, the 49-year-old actress’s most recent film, Lion — for which she has received Critics’ Choice, Golden Globe and SAG nominations, and is a slam-dunk to receive an Oscar nom, »

- Carson Blackwelder

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

15 items from 2017


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