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Marlo Thomas Launches Clothing Line: Until Now, ‘I Had the Choice of Looking Like My Granddaughter or My Grandmother’

Marlo Thomas Launches Clothing Line: Until Now, ‘I Had the Choice of Looking Like My Granddaughter or My Grandmother’
Whether you know her simply as That Girl, an outspoken feminist and ally of Gloria Steinem, for her hit TV show cameos, her comedic turns in films like Deuce Bigalow, or simply the mom of Rachel Green on Friends, Marlo Thomas has had a pretty spectacular professional trajectory. And at 79 years old, the actress shows no signs of slowing down now. In addition to her still vibrant career and work on behalf of St. Jude’s, Thomas is now pursuing a very different dream, launching her own clothing line collection in conjunction with Hsn, which she’ll show off Thursday
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Horror Highlights: Animation & Disneyana Auction, Twenty Twenty-four, Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 10 Vol. 6

Walt Disney's Last Will and Testament, artwork from How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Nightmare Before Christmas, and many, many more incredible items are up for auction in the highly anticipated Animation and Disneyana event that began on December 9th. Also: watch two new clips plus the official trailer for Richard Mundy's Twenty Twenty-Four, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season 10 Vol. 6 cover art and preview pages.

Animation & Disneyana Auction Details: Press Release: "Calabasas, Calif.- Walt Disney's Last Will and Testament, plus his signed document marking the genesis of the Disney Empire/brand; How the Grinch Stole Christmas production artwork (perfectly timed to the 50th anniversary of the animated TV special!) and Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas original artwork and set pieces; Disneyana, featuring rare animation art and Disney park props, including an "Atom-mobile" miniature prop from the retired Journey Through Inner Space attraction, an assortment of
See full article at DailyDead »

Rod Serling’s ‘Patterns’

Is this Rod Serling's best teleplay ever? Van Heflin, Everett Sloane and Ed Begley are at the center of a business power squeeze. Is it all about staying competitive, or is it corporate murder? With terrific early performances from Elizabeth Wilson and Beatrice Straight. Patterns Blu-ray The Film Detective 1956 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date September 27, 2016 / 14.99 Starring Van Heflin, Everett Sloane, Ed Begley, Beatrice Straight, Elizabeth Wilson, Joanna Roos, Valerie Cossart, Eleni Kiamos, Ronnie Welsh, Shirley Standlee, Andrew Duggan, Jack Livesy, John Seymour, James Kelly, John Shelly, Victor Harrison, Sally Gracie, Sally Chamberlin, Edward Binns, Lauren Bacall, Ethel Britton, Michael Dreyfuss, Elaine Kaye, Adrienne Moore. Cinematography Boris Kaufman Film Editors Dave Kummis, Carl Lerner Art Direction Richard Sylbert Assistant Director Charles Maguire Written by Rod Serling Produced by Michael Myerberg Directed by Fielder Cook

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Let me roll off the titles of some 'fifties 'organization
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: “Here Comes Mr. Jordan” (1941; Directed by Alexander Hall) ; Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“A Heavenly Beginning”

By Raymond Benson

They must have done something right. Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941) has proven to be a timeless and universal movie that keeps on giving, and the welcome new release from the Criterion Collection attests to it.

The premise of the film has been around for a while. Most of our generation know the remake better—Heaven Can Wait (1978, starring Warren Beatty and Julie Christie)—which is a superb Oscar-nominated romantic comedy in its own right. Another remake in 2001, Down to Earth, starred Chris Rock.

But that’s not all. It wasn’t until I’d viewed the supplements on the new disk that I appreciated the fact that Mr. Jordan was indeed the first of several Hollywood pictures dealing with “heavenly” concepts—angels, the afterlife, and second chances. In a video discussion, critic Michael Sragow and filmmaker/distributor Michael Schlesinger reveal how the picture’s popularity actually began a trend of similar movies throughout the 1940s—A Guy Named Joe, Angel on My Shoulder, A Matter of Life and Death, It’s a Wonderful Life, and even Mr. Jordan’s direct sequel, Down to Earth (1947, not to be confused with the Chris Rock remake), which features both James Gleason and Edward Everett Horton again playing their roles from the first movie.

Here Comes Mr. Jordan was a major release and surprise hit from Columbia Pictures, a studio that always struggled to be one of the majors despite having director Frank Capra on their team in the ‘30s. Critically and popularly acclaimed, the picture successfully blends fantasy, romance, comedy, and intrigue, creating a delightful, and sometimes thought-provoking, piece of entertainment. It was nominated for Best Picture of 1941, Best Director (Alexander Hall), Best Actor (Robert Montgomery), Best Supporting Actor (James Gleason, and he steals the movie!), and Best B&W Cinematography. The film deservedly won the Oscar for Best Writing, Original Story, for Sidney Buchman and Seton I. Miller.

The story concerns Joe Pendleton (enthusiastically played by Montgomery in a stretch from his usual sophisticated tuxedo-clad characters) as a prizefighter with a heavy New Jersey accent who crashes in his private plane. His soul is saved by the Messenger (Horton), an angel whose job is to escort to Heaven the departing souls from his “territory.” In the mist-filled outskirts of Heaven, Mr. Jordan (benevolently portrayed by Claude Rains), a sort of St. Peter in a three-piece suit, checks in the new souls as they board another plane to take them to their afterlife homes. But Joe’s soul was accidentally taken before his body actually died—and therefore Mr. Jordan grants Joe a second chance. However, his consciousness must be placed into a recently deceased person—so Joe winds up inside a rich, corrupt banker’s body. Joe, in his new persona, sets about turning the banker’s life around for good, and he also attempts to continue his prizefighting. For the latter, he calls in his former manager, Corkle (Gleason) to train him. First, though, he’s got to convince Corkle that he’s really Joe inside the new man’s form. To complicate things, Joe falls in love with the daughter (Evelyn Keyes) of a man the banker destroyed financially and sent to prison. Joe also doesn’t know it yet, but he will have to jump bodies one more time before the story plays out.

The comedy and romance work like a charm, and the fantasy elements of Mr. Jordan are surprisingly effective. The movie is intelligently written and treats its subject matter with respect; and yet it has fun with the mechanics of death and the philosophical discourse of what we think the afterlife really is. The audience is tricked, in a way, into pleasantly enjoying a movie about death. What happens to Joe Pendleton at the end isn’t the norm for a romantic comedy. Technically it’s not a happy ending—and yet, it is. It’s a feel-good movie with a bittersweet center. This is a testament to the quality of writing in Here Comes Mr. Jordan.

The new 2K digital restoration looks fabulous. It has an uncompressed, monaural soundtrack. Along with the aforementioned video conversation about the film, the supplements include a long audio interview with Elizabeth Montgomery (daughter of Robert Montgomery, and, yes, the star of Bewitched) about her father and the movie; the Lux Radio Theatre radio adaptation starring Cary Grant (who was originally approached to star in the film—one can only imagine what it would have been like with Grant), Rains, Keyes, and Gleason; and a trailer. An essay by critic Farran Smith Nehme adorns the booklet.

A little gem from Hollywood released just prior to America’s entrance into World War II, Here Comes Mr. Jordan is a genuine classic, arguably superior to its many remakes and imitations. You will believe...

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See full article at CinemaRetro »

Here Comes Mr. Jordan

Here's a sterling example of what Hollywood excelled at back in the golden age: Robert Montgomery, Evelyn Keyes, Claude Rains and Edward Everett Horton star in possibly the most magical of movies known as Film Blanc. A cosmic goof leaves a man with fifty years yet to live without a body -- so heavenly troubleshooters try to find him a new one. Here Comes Mr. Jordan Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 819 1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 94 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 14, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Robert Montgomery, Evelyn Keyes, Claude Rains, Rita Johnson, Edward Everett Horton, James Gleason. Cinematography Joseph Walker Art Direction Lionel Banks Film Editor Viola Lawrence Original Music Frederick Hollander Written by Sidney Buchman, Seton I. Miller from the play Heaven Can Wait by Harry Segall Produced by Everett Riskin Directed by Alexander Hall

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Some movies are so entertaining that it's best to tell people,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Entertainment News: Film, TV Star & Oscar Winner Patty Duke Dies at 69

Coeur D’Alene, Idaho – She was a lesson in duality. One of her most famous roles was as “identical cousins” on “The Patty Duke Show,” and Anna Marie “Patty” Duke also made public her fight with bipolar disorder. She was also a talented actress, winning an Oscar as teenager for “The Miracle Worker.” Ms. Duke passed away on March 29th, 2016, at the age of 69, at her home in Idaho.

Anna Marie Duke (her friends call her “Anna”) became Patty Duke when she was only eight years old. She went on to fame in the role of Helen Keller in the original 1959-61 Broadway run of “The Miracle Worker,” co-starring Anne Bancroft as Annie Sullivan. The film version (1962) garnered Duke the Best Supporting Actress Oscar, the youngest to ever win at the time at age 16. The next year she starred in “The Patty Duke Show,” with its familiar theme song beginning
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

50 years ago today, Samantha had a baby on ‘Bewitched’

  • Hitfix
50 years ago today, Samantha had a baby on ‘Bewitched’
Tabitha Stephens is celebrating a big birthday today, though age 50 is probably not over-the-hill territory for a half-witch. It was 50 years ago today that “Bewitched” aired the episode “And Then There Were Three,” when Samantha and Darrin’s baby girl, Tabitha, is born. “Bewitched” star Elizabeth Montgomery was pregnant off-camera too during the show’s second season: her second son was born in October of 1965. On many TV shows, the birth of a baby has marked the beginning of the end of the show, as the young newcomer shatters the chemistry of the original cast or dilutes the a show’s premise. Not so for “Bewitched.” Viewers loved Tabitha and all the delightful storylines brought on by a child discovering her powers in a mortal home. The show ultimately aired for eight seasons. After several babies portrayed the growing Tabitha, Erin Murphy played the Stephens daughter for six years on the hit ’60s sitcom.
See full article at Hitfix »

Thanksgiving TV episodes: Let's give thanks for Top 10 of all time'

Thanksgiving TV episodes: Let's give thanks for Top 10 of all time'
Over the years, television has produced many such memorable moments as family and friends gathering together to celebrate Thanksgiving. Below, the top 10 episodes for which I give thanks. -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions 1. "The Bob Newhart Show" - "Over the River and Through the Woods" (1975) Bob (Bob Newhart), Jerry, Howard and Mr. Carlin get completely drunk while spending the holiday at Bob's apartment while Emily (Suzanne Pleshette) is visiting her family. Enjoy special moments of ordering Chinese food for Thanksgiving. 2. "Bewitched" - "Samantha's Thankgiving to Remember" (1967) There's nothing more authentic than an original Thanksgiving with actual Pilgrims and Indians. Ironically, Darren (Dick York) is the one put on trial for being a witch and not Samantha (Elizabeth Montgomery). 3. "Saturday Night Live" - "..."'
See full article at Gold Derby »

Celebrating TV's evil twins and oddball doubles

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Evil goatees, facial ticks and eyepatches… Remember these classic takes on TV’s ‘evil twin’ trope?

Warning: contains spoilers for Battlestar Galactica, Doctor Who series 6, Knightrider, and a 1969 episode of Star Trek.

When it comes to shenanigans and shock value, it’s hard to go past the trope of the evil twin on television. It’s so much fun seeing old-school split-screen on the small screen, where the same actor plays two (or more) parts. It ramps up the fun and fantasy, or delivers a fabulous freak-out moment.

Science fiction feels like the natural habitat of doubles. The audience is already suspending their disbelief, so what’s one more?

Hands-down one of the best uses of twins (or multiples) is from the 2004 reboot of Battlestar Galactica. Cylon hybrids were flawless versions of humans who looked, sounded, acted and believed they were just like you and me. It
See full article at Den of Geek »

Emmy flashback: 'I Love Lucy' debuted 64 years ago today

Emmy flashback: 'I Love Lucy' debuted 64 years ago today
Like everyone else, we love Lucy and celebrate the fact that Lucille Ball's landmark laffer "I Love Lucy" debuted on CBS exactly 64 years ago today on Oct. 15, 1951. The show won the Emmy for Best Situation Comedy twice (1953, 1954) and Ball claimed two trophies as well (Best Comedienne, 1953; Best Actress, Continuing Performance, 1956).  -Break- Ball went on to win two more Emmys for the last two seasons of her second series, "The Lucy Show" (1967, 1968). In 1967, she edged out "Bewitched" stars Elizabeth Montgomery and Agnes Moorehead and "That Girl's" Marlo Thomas. By the way, Montgomery never won an Emmy, despite nine nods, including five for her work as that witch with a twitch. The following year, in what was to be her final Emmy race, Ball prevailed yet again. Her competition:  Montgomery and Thomas, as well as Barbara Feldon ("Get Smart") and Paula Pr...
See full article at Gold Derby »

Watch: What Do You Know About 'Johnny Cool'?

Watch: What Do You Know About 'Johnny Cool'?
Henry Silva’s gaunt face and implacable demeanor made him the perfect villain for a host of films in the 50’s and 60’s but it wasn’t until "Johnny Cool" that he was awarded leading man status. William Asher ("Muscle Beach Party") directed this visceral revenge thriller and cast his then-wife, Elizabeth Montgomery, opposite Silva’s malevolent hitman. Produced by Peter Lawford and co-starring Joey Bishop and Sammy Davis, Jr., the picture occasionally plays like a rat-pack movie without the rat-pack.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Johnny Cool

Henry Silva’s gaunt face and implacable demeanor made him the perfect villain for a host of films in the 50’s and 60’s but it wasn’t until Johnny Cool that he was awarded leading man status. William Asher (Muscle Beach Party) directed this visceral revenge thriller and cast his then-wife, Elizabeth Montgomery, opposite Silva’s malevolent hitman. Produced by Peter Lawford and co-starring Joey Bishop and Sammy Davis, Jr., the picture occasionally plays like a rat-pack movie without the rat-pack.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84
William Bast, who wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two biographies of James Dean, died of complications from Alzheimer’s on May 4. He was 84.

Bast wrote scripts for episodes of series including “Combat!,” “Perry Mason,” “Ben Casey,” “The Outer Limits,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Honey West,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Mod Squad” and “It Takes a Thief.” He also wrote scripts for the BBC and British Independent Television, adapted Jean Giradoux’s play “Tiger at the Gates” for Granada Television and wrote episodes for classic series “The Prisoner.”

In 1976 he received the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for his telepic “The Legend of Lizzie Borden,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery. His 1977 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Man in the Iron Mask,” with Richard Chamberlain in the dual role, was nominated for an Emmy, and in 1982 his script for “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” with Anthony Andrews and Ian McKellen,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84

William Bast, Writer for TV Who Penned James Dean Bios, Dies at 84
William Bast, who wrote extensively for both film and TV and was also known for his two biographies of James Dean, died of complications from Alzheimer’s on May 4. He was 84.

Bast wrote scripts for episodes of series including “Combat!,” “Perry Mason,” “Ben Casey,” “The Outer Limits,” “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Honey West,” “Dr. Kildare,” “The Mod Squad” and “It Takes a Thief.” He also wrote scripts for the BBC and British Independent Television, adapted Jean Giradoux’s play “Tiger at the Gates” for Granada Television and wrote episodes for classic series “The Prisoner.”

In 1976 he received the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for his telepic “The Legend of Lizzie Borden,” starring Elizabeth Montgomery. His 1977 adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ “The Man in the Iron Mask,” with Richard Chamberlain in the dual role, was nominated for an Emmy, and in 1982 his script for “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” with Anthony Andrews and Ian McKellen,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Boob on the Tube: Top Ten Worst Movie Adaptations of TV Shows

Some of the greatest (or at least heavily favored) American television shows got the big screen treatment when they were selected to have their small screen following turn into a cinematic experience. Unfortunately, for every beloved nostalgic television show that translated successfully in movie theaters (The Brady Bunch Movie, Star Trek, Batman, etc.) there are boob tube stinkers that overtake the good crop. Sure, there are middle-of-the-road movie adaptations of television programs that have a mixed bag reception (1997’s Leave It To Beaver, 1987’s Dragnet, 2012’s Dark Shadows, etc.). Nevertheless, it is always the unflattering fare that receive the bulk of the attention (do you register, 1999’s The Wild, Wild West ?).

In Boob on the Tube: Top Ten Worst Movie Adaptations of TV Shows we will take a look at the top ten televised offenders that dared to venture into cinema’s stratosphere only to end up floating down shamefully
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Let's give thanks for the top 10 Thanksgiving TV episodes of all time'

Let's give thanks for the top 10 Thanksgiving TV episodes of all time'
Over the years, television has produced many such memorable moments as family and friends gathering together to celebrate Thanksgiving. Here are my top 10 episodes to give thanks. -Break- 1. "The Bob Newhart Show" - "Over the River and Through the Woods" (1975) Bob (Bob Newhart), Jerry, Howard and Mr. Carlin get completely drunk while spending the holiday at Bob's apartment while Emily (Suzanne Pleshette) is visiting her family.  Enjoy special moments of ordering Chinese food for Thanksgiving. 2. "Bewitched" - "Samantha's Thankgiving to Remember" (1967) There's nothing more authentic than an original Thanksgiving with actual Pilgrims and Indians. Ironically, Darren (Dick York) is the one put on trial for being a witch and not Samantha (Elizabeth Montgomery). 15 hottest forums posts: Your Thanksgiving choices of worst film turkeys 3. "Saturday Night Live" - "Paul Simon/George Harrison..."'
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Bewitched' follow-up about Samantha's granddaughter lands at NBC

'Bewitched' follow-up about Samantha's granddaughter lands at NBC
The highly sought-after followup to Bewitched has finally found a home at NBC, EW has confirmed. The network confirmed on Wednesday that it has given a pilot commitment to the followup, penned by The Vow writers Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein. It follows Daphne, Samantha’s granddaughter and Tabitha’s daughter, who is now a single twentysomething with magical powers. According to Deadline, who first reported the news, she soon realizes that her seemingly perfect life is missing one thing: love. The original series starring Elizabeth Montgomery as Samantha aired from 1964 to 1972. Tabitha, an ABC spinoff centering on her daughter Tabitha,
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

NBC Lands Bewitched Sequel Series

The next in an increasingly common series of “remakes” or “reboots” on television has found a home. Variety reports that NBC has landed the Bewitched sequel TV show that has been shopped around for the last couple of weeks. The proposed series will follow the granddaughter of Darren and Samantha Stevens, who were played in the original series by Dick York (and then Dick Sargent) and Elizabeth Montgomery. The fantasy sitcom ran for eight seasons on NBC from 1964-1972 and spawned a short-lived spinoff Tabitha in 1977 and an ill-conceived feature film remake in 2005 starring Nicole Kidman and Will Ferrell. NBC has given a pilot production commitment to the Bewitched sequel series, which hails from writers Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, whose credits include Never Been Kissed and The Vow.

The post NBC Lands Bewitched Sequel Series appeared first on Collider.
See full article at Collider.com »

Bewitched Reboot Scores NBC Deal: New Show Will Follow Samantha's Granddaughter Daphne

Bewitched Reboot Scores NBC Deal: New Show Will Follow Samantha's Granddaughter Daphne
With a twitch of the nose and a little bit of magic, Bewitched is coming back! The beloved comedy series, which ran from 1964 through 1972, is being revived and reformatted in a new take. Deadline reports that the remake has landed at NBC and will be penned by Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein, who wrote 2012’s The Vow. This new series will center around Daphne, the granddaughter of Samantha Stephens (played by Elizabeth Montgomery in the original series) and the daughter of Tabitha Stephens (played by [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

The 50 Funniest Women of the Past 50 Years

  • Hitfix
The 50 Funniest Women of the Past 50 Years
Make people laugh and they won't even realize you're making them think. Over the past 50 years, women have broken through the glass ceiling time after time, shattering stereotypes and thumbing their noses at the old chestnut that "Women aren't funny." Fact: Anybody who says women aren't funny doesn't want them to be funny. We're looking back on the 50 funniest women of the past 50 years, their contributions to comedy, and their enduring legacies that inspire men and women alike. These are the 50 women who have helped (and are helping) to introduce the next class of hilarious women, which will inevitably include Amy Schumer, Lena Dunham, Mindy Kaling, Tig Notaro, Chelsea Handler, Maria Bamford, Aubrey Plaza, and Kate McKinnon. Keep in mind this list only includes women who are primarily performers in movies, television, and standup comedy. That's why you don't see legends like Nora Ephron, Anne Beatts, and Elaine May here.
See full article at Hitfix »
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