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Songs for Screens: Until the Ribbon Breaks Premiere New Track ‘Count the Lightning’ (Exclusive)

“Songs for Screens” is a Variety column written by Andrew Hampp, a VP at New York-based music sponsorship and experiential agency Mac Presents and former branding correspondent for Billboard. Each week, the column will highlight noteworthy use of music in advertising and marketing campaigns, as well as new and catalog songs that we deem ripe for synch use.

Just a few short years ago, Until the Ribbon Breaks, a Welsh alt-pop duo fronted by singer-songwriter Pete Lawrie-Winfield, were riding all the highs of that come with being an acclaimed band in the mid-2010s — a well-received major-label debut, buzzy collabs with Run The Jewels and sold-out tours supporting acts like Lorde and London Grammar, and multiple synchs for their music, most notably HBO’s “The Leftovers,” ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” and a trailer for Warner Bros.’ “The Nice Guys.”

Unfortunately for Lawrie-Winfield, relocating to America from the UK only intensified his struggles with alcoholism and substance
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Songs for Screens: Until the Ribbon Breaks Premiere New Track ‘Count the Lightning’ (Exclusive)

“Songs for Screens” is a Variety column written by Andrew Hampp, a VP at New York-based music sponsorship and experiential agency Mac Presents and former branding correspondent for Billboard. Each week, the column will highlight noteworthy use of music in advertising and marketing campaigns, as well as new and catalog songs that we deem ripe for synch use.

Just a few short years ago, Until the Ribbon Breaks, a Welsh alt-pop duo fronted by singer-songwriter Pete Lawrie-Winfield, were riding all the highs of that come with being an acclaimed band in the mid-2010s — a well-received major-label debut, buzzy collabs with Run The Jewels and sold-out tours supporting acts like Lorde and London Grammar, and multiple synchs for their music, most notably HBO’s “The Leftovers,” ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” and a trailer for Warner Bros.’ “The Nice Guys.”

Unfortunately for Lawrie-Winfield, relocating to America from the UK only intensified his struggles with alcoholism and substance
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Real-Life Americans Confess to Javier Bardem in ‘To the Wonder’ Spin-Off

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Real-Life Americans Confess to Javier Bardem in ‘To the Wonder’ Spin-Off
Terrence Malick is a singular director. Not just in his exploration of the metaphysical through surreal imagery and meditative voiceover, but in his filming style. Malik will often shoot hours of footage with no grand plan in mind, only “finding” the film in the edit bay. As a result, countless actors and plot lines end up […]

The post ‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Real-Life Americans Confess to Javier Bardem in ‘To the Wonder’ Spin-Off appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Surprise Terrence Malick Spinoff Film Focuses on Javier Bardem’s Priest From ‘To The Wonder’

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Surprise Terrence Malick Spinoff Film Focuses on Javier Bardem’s Priest From ‘To The Wonder’
Terrence Malick is one of the most notorious filmmakers when it comes to cutting footage. Not even being a household name guarantees you a spot in the final edit of a Malick movie (just ask Adrien Brody, Viggo Mortensen, and more). The director’s 2012 drama “To The Wonder” stars Javier Bardem in the brief role of a conflicted priest. The theatrical cut of the film features Bardem more in voiceover as his character meditates on the nature of faith and love, but it turns out that a lot more footage of the actor was shot that never saw the light of day. Until now.

One of the films world premiering at the upcoming South by Southwest Film Festival next month is “Thy Kingdom Come,” which has been revealed as a surprise spinoff of “To The Wonder.” The 43-minute film features Bardem’s priest as he interviews different Oklahoma natives about what is troubling them most.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer Reveals a Surprise Spinoff from Terrence Malick’s ‘To the Wonder’

Filmmaker Terrence Malick doesn’t strike one as the type to traffic in sequels and spinoffs, especially for his little-seen Ben Affleck/Rachel McAdams/Olga Kurylenko drama To the Wonder, but that’s exactly what’s happening. A trailer for a short film called Thy Kingdom Come has landed online, which effectively serves as a spinoff of the 2012 film and is made up of unused footage. Per The New Yorker (via The Playlist), photojournalist Eugene Richards was hired by Malick to join him on the Bartlesville, Oklahoma set of To the Wonder, where Richards was tasked with filming …
See full article at Collider.com »

First Trailer for 'Thy Kingdom Come' Made from Extra Malick Footage

"I also see how difficult it must be for you to survive..." A trailer has debuted for an intriguing film titled Thy Kingdom Come, which is premiering at the SXSW Film Festival in March in the "Visions" section. How many remember Terrence Malick's 2012 film To the Wonder, with all the twirling? Thy Kingdom Come is a film made up of extra footage from early research on To the Wonder. In 2010, photojournalist Eugene Richards was hired by Malick to go to the town Bartlesville, Oklahoma with Javier Bardem (who plays a priest in the film) and meet some of the local residents. Some knew who he was, others didn't. "Absolutely no one cared, in the end, who he was, except that he was there to listen." Richards eventually got the rights back and made this 43 minute film, which screens alongside Malick's Vr project Together. First look below. Here's the first
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Terrence Malick’s ‘To The Wonder’ Gets A Spinoff Starring Javier Bardem

‘Thy Kingdom Come’ Trailer: Terrence Malick’s ‘To The Wonder’ Gets A Spinoff Starring Javier Bardem
As we all know, Terrence Malick‘s process on each of his features has involved shooting thousands upon thousands of feet of footage, and then finding the film in the edit. This has led to countless actors being cut from his movies, and a plethora of unseen material never hitting the big screen. However, a fascinating slice from the director’s underrated 2012 effort “To The Wonder” will soon be seeing the light of day.
See full article at The Playlist »

Terrence Malick’s ‘To the Wonder’ Gets Expanded in First Trailer for ‘Thy Kingdom Come’

Considering how much footage is shot when it comes to the films of Terrence Malick, we often see varying editions (The New World) and versions (Voyage of Time), not to mention the numerous actors whose characters are completely cut out of the film. It was only a matter of time before an entirely different film was made of the unused footage, and now that’s the case when it comes to extra materials left in the editing bay from To the Wonder.

Back in 2010, photojournalist Eugene Richards was hired by Malick to venture into the town Bartlesville, Oklahoma with Javier Bardem as his priest character. Over the course of the shoot, they spoke to the townspeople, ranging from a former Ku Klux Klan leader to a woman who recounted her stories of sexual assault. While some of this was seen in the final film, of course, there was mountains of it left over.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Swiss Director Germinal Roux Talks About ‘Fortuna,’ Filming Adolescence

Berlin — Featuring as part of the Berlin Film Festival’s Generation 14plus section, “Fortuna,” the sophomore outing of Lausanne-born director Germinal Roux, tells the story of an immigrant 14-year old Ethiopian girl who, after crossing the Mediterranean, finds refuge in a Swiss Alpine Catholic monastery.

“Fortuna” is sold by Paris-based Loco films and produced by Ruth Waldburger at Swiss Vega Productions, in co-production with Géraldine Sprimont and Anne-Laure Guégan at Belgium’s Need Productions. Starring Kidist Siyum, the cast also includes international cinema icon Bruno Ganz, who has worked with Eric Rohmer, Théo Angelopoulos, Wim Wenders, Ridley Scott and Terrence Malick.

Roux is one of a notable number of Swiss filmmakers, like those of the omnibus feature “Wonderland,” which premiered at Locarno in 2015, feeling the urge to address hot issues such as migration, which was, for a long time, excluded from their national cinema and political debate.

A B&W movie – like all Roux’ films – capturing the appeal
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Rider’ Trailer Goes on an Emotional Journey Through the Badlands of South Dakota

One of the most heart-stirring, authentic films I’ve seen in the past year is Chloé Zhao’s remarkable drama The Rider, which stars first-time actor Brady Jandreau in a story loosely based on his life. He plays a cowboy who must deal with the struggle of the reality of his life’s passion after surviving a near-fatal head injury. Although it premiered at Cannes (where we reviewed), I caught it at New York Film Festival, but instead of a qualifying run last year, Sony Classics decided to hold it until this spring and now the first trailer has arrived.

“What does a cowboy do when he can’t ride?,” Ed Frankl said in our review. “Chloe Zhao’s absorbing South Dakota-set sophomore feature has its titular rider come to terms with such a fate, in a film that’s a beguiling mix of docudrama and fiction whose story echoes
See full article at The Film Stage »

13 Indie Romance Movies to Stream This Valentine’s Day on Netflix and Beyond

  • Indiewire
Romance isn’t dead — in fact, it may be more readily available than ever before. Of course, we’re talking about movie romances, which round out the slates of so many current streaming platforms, from Netflix to Amazon Prime and FilmStruck. From romantic comedies to classic dramas and every twist on the genre imaginable, love is still supreme in the cinematic sense, and this Valentine’s Day holds a bevy of options for lovey-dovey movie watching.

We’ve picked thirteen (very different, all assuredly quite romantic) indie romances available to stream right now. In short, we’ve got your Valentine’s Day plans (and your post-Valentine’s Day plans, too) right here. Check them out.

Beyond the Lights

Chemistry is the name of the game in Gina Prince-Bythewood’s freight-train fast music industry romance, which pairs up rising starlet Gugu Mbatha-Raw (pure charm) alongside pre-“Birth of a Nation” Nate Parker.
See full article at Indiewire »

Face to Face With German Films Initiative Aims to Disrupt Perceptions

“It is a gamble,” admits Mariette Rissenbeek, managing director of German Films. But as the driving force behind the Face to Face With German Films initiative, which will showcase its third phase — this year spotlighting directors — at the 68th Berlinale, she is confident it’s a gamble worth taking. Initially launching a lineup of six emerging German actresses at the 2016 London Film Festival, with phase two, showcasing six actors, unfurling at last year’s Cannes Film Festival, the program is designed to raise the profile, and to alter the international perception, of German cinema, through the promotion of its brightest, freshest faces.

This year’s program features helmers Emily Atef (her “Three Days in Quiberon” screens in Berlin’s competition), Valeska Grisebach (whose “Western” bowed last year in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard to acclaim), Lars Kraume (his pic “The People vs. Fritz Bauer” won six German Film Awards in 2016 while his new feature “The Silent Revolution” screens
See full article at Variety - Film News »

First Look at Terrence Malick’s Vr Experience ‘Together,’ Premiering at SXSW

After experimenting with his form of boundary-pushing, cinema-as-memory films to great, succesful lengths with his last three narrative features–not to mention Voyage of Time, which we’re still awaiting an actual U.S. release for–Terrence Malick will return to more of a traditional script with his WWII drama Radegund, hopefully releasing later this year. But first, after splicing in avant-garde and experiential touches with his last few films, he’s making the natural step into virtual reality.

Premiering at South by Southwest Festival–where he gave a rare public talk last year–on March 13 is the Vr experience Together, which is directed by Malick and shot by cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto (Silence, The Wolf of Wall Street, Brokeback Mountain). Clocking in at 5 minutes and 46 seconds and featuring music by Simon Franglen, see the synopsis below, as well as the first look above.

Together” is a Vr experience about the power of human connection.
See full article at The Film Stage »

SXSW 2018 Adds New Terrence Malick Vr Movie, ‘Isle Dogs,’ ‘Galveston’ Starring Elle Fanning & More

Hey SXSW Film Festival, you’re burying the lede! Organizers have announced the latest additions to their 2018 lineup and the expected wave of titles are here: indies, arthouse and genre flicks. But a new Terrence Malick film? C’mon, you can’t just bury that near the bottom!

Yep, while we patiently await the director’s (probably pastoral) WWII movie “Radegund,” he’s ventured into the world of Vr to make “Together.” What’s it about?
See full article at The Playlist »

Sundance 2018 Review: Hal, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the old studio system. Directors such as Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich, Brian De Palma, Robert Altman, Terrence Malick, William Friedkin, and others debuted films or made their breakthrough works during this period. One major director of this era who’s rather less often cited is Hal Ashby, who had a remarkable run of great films in the 70’s. Seven films in nine years, to be exact: The Landlord (1970), Harold and Maude (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Shampoo (1975), Bound for Glory (1976), Coming...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Canon Of Film: ‘Days of Heaven’

In this edition of Canon Of Film, we look back at ‘Days of Heaven‘, writer/director Terrence Malick‘s sophomore masterpiece. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Days Of Heaven (1979)

Director/Screenplay: Terrence Malick

It’s not just that Terrence Malick only works when he’s inspired. He also only works when he gets the money, and even then, if he can’t do exactly what he wants to do–instead of compromising–he abandons the project entirely, deciding it better to get only what he wants than to get a compromised version, and often what he wants is some of the most amazingly difficult and nearly impossible-to-shoot scenes. In Days of Heaven, arguably his best film, all the scenes outdoors and in the daytime were shot during the “magic hour” (Film Dictionary: Magic Hour- The time during the day, about an hour
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

SXSW Film Festival Lineup Unveiled, John Krasinski’s ‘A Quiet Place’ Set as Opener

SXSW Film Festival Lineup Unveiled, John Krasinski’s ‘A Quiet Place’ Set as Opener
Emily Blunt and John Krasinski’s supernatural horror film “A Quiet Place” will launch the 25th edition of the South by Southwest film festival on March 9.

A Quiet Place,” which marks real-life married couple Blunt and Krasinski’s first big-screen effort together, is one of 132 features, including 86 world premieres, playing at the 10-day festival in Austin, Texas. Movies starring Armie Hammer, Olivia Wilde, Neil Young, and Molly Shannon also made the cut.

Other notable titles unveiled on Wednesday include the comedy “Blockers,” starring Leslie Mann and Ike Barinholtz; “You Can Choose Your Family,” with Jim Gaffigan; “Final Portrait,” toplined by Geoffrey Rush and Hammer; “A Vigilante,” starring Wilde; “The Legacy of the Whitetail Deer Hunter,” with Josh Brolin; “Boundaries,” toplined by Vera Farmiga; Daryl Hannah’s “Paradox,” starring Young; “Write When You Get Work,” with Emily Mortimer and Finn Wittrock; and “Wild Nights With Emily,” toplined by Shannon.

SXSW director of film Janet Pierson told Variety that “A Quiet Place
See full article at Variety - TV News »

SXSW Film Festival Lineup Unveiled, John Krasinski’s ‘A Quiet Place’ Set as Opener

SXSW Film Festival Lineup Unveiled, John Krasinski’s ‘A Quiet Place’ Set as Opener
Emily Blunt and John Krasinski’s supernatural horror film “A Quiet Place” will launch the 25th edition of the South by Southwest film festival on March 9.

A Quiet Place,” which marks real-life married couple Blunt and Krasinski’s first big-screen effort together, is one of 132 features, including 86 world premieres, playing at the 10-day festival in Austin, Texas. Movies starring Armie Hammer, Olivia Wilde, Neil Young, and Molly Shannon also made the cut.

Other notable titles unveiled on Wednesday include the comedy “Blockers,” starring Leslie Mann and Ike Barinholtz; “You Can Choose Your Family,” with Jim Gaffigan; “Final Portrait,” toplined by Geoffrey Rush and Hammer; “A Vigilante,” starring Wilde; “The Legacy of the Whitetail Deer Hunter,” with Josh Brolin; “Boundaries,” toplined by Vera Farmiga; Daryl Hannah’s “Paradox,” starring Young; “Write When You Get Work,” with Emily Mortimer and Finn Wittrock; and “Wild Nights With Emily,” toplined by Shannon.

SXSW director of film Janet Pierson told Variety that “A Quiet Place
See full article at Variety - Film News »

“How Do You Make Sympathetic an Intentionally Enigmatic Character?”: Editor Mark Yoshikawa on The Catcher Was a Spy

Mark Yoshikawa worked as an assistant editor for a decade before he began editing films and TV series full time. This decade he’s edited three films by Terrence Malick, the first two installments of the Hunger Games franchise and three episodes of HBO’s Westworld. His latest film, The Catcher Was a Spy, tells the real-life story of Moe Berg, a professional baseball player who became a spy for a U.S. intelligence agency during World War II. The film stars Paul Rudd, in a rare dramatic, along with cast of heavy hitters: Jeff Daniels, Guy Pearce and Paul Giamatti. Below, Yoshikawa speaks with Filmmaker about […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Rotterdam Film Review: ‘Jimmie’

Rotterdam Film Review: ‘Jimmie’
How is it possible that no one thought to warn Jesper Ganslandt that putting blond Swedes in the role of fleeing refugees, in order to make today’s humanitarian crisis more accessible to Westerners, was a really, really bad concept? Good intentions make lousy paving stones, and in the case of “Jimmie,” the road leads to a seriously misguided place. Shot in a late Malickian style and starring Ganslandt’s 4-year-old son, Hunter, the film is meant as a full-immersion plunge into the terrors of escaping one’s homeland through hostile territory. Yet substituting Scandis for Syrians or Africans or Rohingya doesn’t increase empathy, it just smacks of “white lives matter.” While that surely isn’t the director’s goal, it’s hard to get beyond this unwanted consequence.

His timing also isn’t great: Could these be the Nordic refugees Trump wants to welcome? It’s especially unclear who “Jimmie” is meant to target, since
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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