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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997 | 1996

1-20 of 39 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Ring in the new year with the greatest New Year's Eve movies ever

31 December 2016 9:15 AM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Ring in the new year with the greatest New Year's Eve movies everRing in the new year with the greatest New Year's Eve movies everBrianne Hogan12/31/2016 12:15:00 Pm

Such as Irl, New Year’s Eve in movies tend to punctuate big moments. Long-awaited kisses, horrific endings, beautiful beginnings abound as everyone downs flutes of champagne while attempting to sing the words to “Auld Lang Syne” (even if no one understands exactly what they’re singing).

As we say goodbye to 2015 and ring in 2016, we look at some of cinema’s most memorable New Year’s moments from years past, including everything from the scary to the silly to the swoony.

Check out our picks: Ghostbusters II

If you think your New Year’s Eve sucks, remember it could be worse. Like, evil painting-dwelling-ghost-Vigo-worse. Vigo is attempting to return to the mortal world and wrecks a whole lot of havoc »

- Brianne Hogan

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Fathom Events and Turner Classic Movies Announce the “TCM Big Screen Classics” Line-up for 2017

12 December 2016 7:31 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Fly over the moon.  Sing in the rain. Fasten your seatbelts. Make an offer no one can refuse. See classic movies on the big screen!

Gene Kelly will sing in the rain, Bette Davis will fasten her seatbelt for a bumpy night, Marlon Brando will make an offer no one can refuse, Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint will scurry across Mount Rushmore, and Elliott and E.T. will fly over the moon – and they’ll do it all on the silver screen in 2017. Today, Fathom Events and TCM announce their continuing partnership to bring monthly screenings of their “TCM Big Screen Classics” series to movie theaters nationwide throughout the year.

For the second consecutive year, “TCM Big Screen Classics” offers film fans an amazing journey into the magic of movies year-round. Beginning in January, the series presents one or more films each month in movie theaters – all accompanied by specially »

- Tom Stockman

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Short Cuts

9 December 2016 8:22 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Success in the ’90s gave Robert Altman the opportunity to experiment once again. Several short stories by Raymond Carver interlock in a mosaic of Los Angeles populated by scores of actors in ensemble mode. Clocking in at three hours, Altman’s epic has all the time and space it needs.

Short Cuts

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 265

1993 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 187 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 18, 2016 / 39.95

Starring Andie MacDowell, Bruce Davison, Jack Lemmon, Julianne Moore,

Matthew Modine, Anne Archer, Fred Ward, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Chris Penn, Lili Taylor, Robert Downey Jr., Madeleine Stowe, Tim Robbins, Lily Tomlin, Tom Waits, Frances McDormand, Peter Gallagher, Annie Ross, Lori Singer, Lyle Lovett, Buck Henry, Huey Lewis, Margery Bond, Robert DoQui.

Cinematography Walt Lloyd

Production Designer Stephen Altman

Art Direction Jerry Fleming

Film Editors Suzy Elmiger, Geraldine Peroni

Original Music Gavin Friday, Mark Isham

Written by Robert Altman, Frank Barhydt from writings »

- Glenn Erickson

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Interview: Co-Directors Josh Gordon & Will Speck Invite All to ‘Office Christmas Party’

7 December 2016 11:00 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The raucous party movie has become a reliable staple in movieland, and now a production tackles the holiday soiré, and all that can go wrong. “Office Christmas Party” is co-directed by Josh Gordon and Will Speck, who also gave us “Blades of Glory” and “The Switch.”

The story features T.J. Miller and Jennifer Aniston as the brother and sister who has inherited their father’s computer business. Miller runs the Chicago office, which is under performing. Aniston’s character wants to shut the branch down, but Miller thinks an epic holiday party will convince a potential client (Courtney B. Vance) to sign on and save the company, and enlists the aide of officemates portrayed by Jason Bateman, Olivia Munn and Kate McKinnon. The movie is filled with wild and funny takes on celebrating the holiday ritual, and shows off the city of Chicago in all of its winter glory. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Always be closing: the manly world of David Mamet

31 October 2016 11:19 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Philip Laverty Nov 10, 2016

From The Edge and The Untouchables, to the mighty Glengarry Glen Ross: a salute to the movie writing of David Mamet.

Spoilers ahead for The Untouchables, The Spanish Prisoner, and House Of Games

There's a moment in 1992’s Glengarry Glen Ross when Alec Baldwin, sent from head office on what he calls a “mission of mercy”, opens his motivational speech to an office of real estate salesmen by turning on Jack Lemmon’s Shelley 'The Machine' Levene.

“Put that coffee down,” he demands as Lemmon pours himself what he, probably reasonably, considers to be a well-earned cup of Joe.

“Coffee’s for closers only,” Baldwin points out, using the term for someone who can make a successful sale. The person who can close it.

Your name’s Levene?” he asks a few moments later. “You call yourself a salesman, you son of a bitch?”

The callous disdain of this moment, »

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Weekly Rushes. Toronto Wraps, Curtis Hanson, Art-House Donald Trump, "Blood Simple" Storyboards

21 September 2016 10:19 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

NEWSJackieThe Toronto International Film Festival has wrapped and its winners (such as they are) have been announced, including Damien Chazelle's La La Land (read our take) and Pablo Larraín's Jackie. Our full index of coverage, as well as our favorite films, can be found here—stay tuned for director interviews! Meanwhile, if you want the truly best and most comprehensive review of the many, many films that played in Toronto, we highly recommend Cinema Scope's coverage.Director Curtis Hanson, best known for L.A. Confidential, has died at the age of 71.Netflix is going to produce a 10-episode version of Spike Lee's debut film, She's Gotta Have It, with Lee returning to direct.Recommended VIEWINGThe trailer for a movie we hadn't realized existed: Costa-Gavras's Missing, Palme d'Or and Best Actor Winner—for Jack Lemmon—at Cannes in 1982. Also starring Sissy Spacek, the film is newly restored and ripe for our ignorant re-discovery. »

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The Search Begins In Trailer For Costa-Gavras’ Newly Restored, Oscar Winning ‘Missing’ Starring Jack Lemmon & Sissy Spacek

19 September 2016 9:55 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

At the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, filmmaker Costa-Gavras, perhaps best known the thriller “Z,” arrived on the Croisette to unveil the restoration of his acclaimed 1982 picture “Missing.” It was a welcome return for the director, who first premiered his film there, and was honored with the Palme d’Or for the movie, which also saw Jack Lemmon take home an award for his performance.

Continue reading The Search Begins In Trailer For Costa-Gavras’ Newly Restored, Oscar Winning ‘Missing’ Starring Jack Lemmon & Sissy Spacek at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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30 Movie Sequels That Took Forever to Hit the Big Screen (Photos)

12 September 2016 1:05 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Long-gestating followups include blockbusters like “Jurassic World” and famous flops like “Blues Brothers 2000George Miller took nearly 30 years to follow up “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” with the Tom Hardy-Charlize Theron thriller “Mad Max: Fury Road.” “The Odd Couple II” is among the sequels with the biggest gaps between films. Twenty-nine years after the 1968 original, Jack Lemmon returned as Felix Unger and Walter Matthau was Oscar Madison in their last film together. “Tron: Legacy” came 28 years after the original, and featured Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner. Shot in 3D, the film featured extensive visual effects and a score by. »

- Todd Cunningham and Beatrice Verhoeven

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The Timelessness of Loneliness: Billy Wilder's The Apartment

7 September 2016 12:02 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

From the factory-like offices of the 1960s to the endlessness of the internet in the 21st century, The Apartment is an evergreen classic that endures to remind us that a little companionship can go a long way.

 Billy Wilder made a career out of making timeless classics. From the noir groundbreaker Double Indemnity to the boundary-pushing comedy Some Like It Hot, his run cemented him as an all-time great. But it's his five-time Oscar winning film The Apartment that unsentimentally tackled love, sex, and loneliness in modern America without knowing it would stay modern for at least fifty more years.

The Apartment was released in the summer of 1960. And with the new decade brought a new shift in the United States in the way we approached sex in film and culture. The Motion Picture Production Code (sometimes referred to as “The Hays Code”) was loosening its grip, and the cultural »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Collin Llewellyn)

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The Seven Greatest Director/Actor Combos

4 September 2016 5:47 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Some actors and directors go together like spaghetti and meatballs. They just gel together in a rare way that makes their collaborations special. Here is a list of the seven best parings of director and actor in film history.

 

7: Tim Burton & Johnny Depp:

 Edward Scissorhands; Ed Wood; Sleepy Hollow; Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Corpse Bride; Sweeney Todd; Alice in Wonderland; Dark Shadows

 Of all the parings on this list, these two make the oddest films. (In a good way.) Tim Burton is one of the most visually imaginative filmmakers of his generation and Johnny Depp was once the polymorphous master of playing a wide variety of eccentric characters. They were a natural combo. Depp made most of his best films with Burton, before his current ‘Jack Sparrow’ period began. The duo had the knack for telling stories about misfits and freaks, yet making them seem sympathetic and likable. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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On this day: Joan Allen, Jcvd Movies, and Jacqueline Susann

20 August 2016 7:27 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

On this day as it relates to showbiz history...

1858 Charles Darwin first publishes his theory of evolution. That one that caused Spencer Tracy so much trouble in Inherit the Wind.

1882 Tchaikovsky debuts his "Overture of 1812". It's still used in movies two centuries later in a truly diverse range of movies including The Iron Lady, Laurence Anyways, V For Vendetta and The Blind Side

1918 Novelist Jacqueline Susann is born. Her trashy best-sellers become hit movies and even turn Oscar heads: Valley of the Dolls (1967 best score nomination)  and Jacqueline Susann's Once is Not Enough (1975, best supporting actress nomination)

1931 Fright haired boxing promoter Don King is born. Sixty-six and a ½ years later Ving Rhames wins the Golden Globe playing him in a TV movie. Remember that sweet but odd moment when Ving Rhames invited Jack Lemmon on stage with him to share the award he had just lost for 12 Angry Men? King's »

- NATHANIEL R

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Director Arthur Hiller, whose 'In-Laws' was a perfect comedy, dies at 92

17 August 2016 2:55 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Arthur Hiller was never the coolest filmmaker in the room. He leaves behind a list of films that were genuinely loved by audiences and an ocean of collaborators and friends who speak of him in glowing terms, and honestly, as a storyteller, what more could anyone ask? There’s certainly some cachet in the idea that you’re breaking new ground stylistically or you’re doing things that other people are ripping off or you’re part of some formal movement of deconstructionists. I like plenty of filmmakers who chase cool like it is oxygen, necessary for their entire existence. Arthur Hiller, though, was a meat and potatoes kind of guy, and he made movies that spoke to his optimistic view of who we could be as people, shot through with just a hint of cynicism at times. My personal favorite of his movies is The In-Laws, which I just rewatched a few weeks ago. »

- Drew McWeeny

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Review: Chevalier

11 August 2016 6:20 AM, PDT | Pure Movies | See recent Pure Movies news »

This is the Pure Movies review of Chevalier, directed by Athina Rachel Tsangari and starring Vangelis Mourikis, Nikos Orphanos and Yorgos Pirpassopoulos. Written by Dr. Garth Twa. Greece is renowned for many things: it is the land of myth, of Dionysian revels, of octopuses hung like pantyhose on clotheslines to dry. It is the land of our first storytelling, birthplace of epics, of comedies, of tragedies; but not, until now, cinematic stories. As a film industry, there hasn’t been much to talk about except, of course, the exceptions, like Theodoros Angelopolous (Ulysses’ Gaze, 1995, Eternity and a Day, 1998—both won big at Cannes) and Costa-Gavras, who, really, made American movies, like Missing (1982) with Jack Lemmon, or Mad City (1997) with John Travolta, or French movies like Z (1969). ‘Greek’ films like Never On a Sunday (Jules Dassin, 1960) and Zorba the Greek (Michael Cacoyannis, 1964) were Greek fetishisation made palatable to tourists by having non-Greek lead actors being swarthy. »

- Dr. Garth Twa

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The Top Ten Funny Ladies of the Movies

7 August 2016 10:29 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The recent box office success of The Boss firmly establishes Melissa McCarthy as the current queen of movie comedies (Amy Schumer could be a new contender after an impressive debut last Summer with Trainwreck), but let us think back about those other funny ladies of filmdom. So while we’re enjoying the female reboot/re-imagining of Ghostbusters and those Bad Moms, here’s a top ten list that will hopefully inspire lots of laughter and cause you to search out some classic comedies. It’s tough to narrow them down to ten, but we’ll do our best, beginning with… 10. Eve Arden The droll Ms. Arden represents the comic sidekicks who will attempt to puncture the pomposity of the leading ladies with a well-placed wisecrack (see also the great Thelma Ritter in Rear Window). Her career began in the early 1930’s with great bit roles in Stage Door and Dancing Lady. »

- Jim Batts

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Is female to male gender-swapping Hollywood’s new comedy secret weapon?

2 August 2016 9:53 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Chris Hemsworth’s turn in Ghostbusters paved the way for Channing Tatum to score comedy points as a merman in a remake of the 1984 Tom Hanks comedy

It’s easy to forget how threatening society once found the comedy of emasculation. When Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot bowed in theaters in 1959, featuring Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis as on-the-run musicians who dress up as women to escape from the mob (and get rather lost in the fun of the masquerade) the Catholic-run National Legion of Decency condemned the movie as “morally objectionable” for promoting homosexuality, lesbianism and transvestism.

Related: Channing Tatum to play mermaid in Splash as remake does gender swap

Continue reading »

- Ben Child

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Gloria DeHaven, Star of Golden Age Movie Musicals, Dies at 91

1 August 2016 8:07 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Gloria DeHaven, who starred in classic movie musicals in the 1940s and ’50s — mostly for MGM, has died. She was 91.

The actress died Saturday in hospice care in Las Vegas, after suffering a stroke several months ago, her agent told Reuters.

“With Gloria DeHaven’s passing, we have lost another precious link to the classical cinema of yesteryear. Gloria was a talented actor and singer, and she will be sorely missed,” said SAG-aftra President Gabrielle Carteris.

DeHaven, who’s career spanned six decades, embodied Hollywood’s Golden Age with her spunk and charisma.

She made her big-screen debut as a child, playing Paulette Goddard’s younger sister, in Charlie Chaplin’s last silent movie, 1936’s “Modern Times.” DeHaven starred in more than two dozen films, including her breakout role in Lucille Ball’s “Best Foot Forward” (1943); “Two Girls and a Sailor” (1944) with Van Johnson, June Allyson, and Jimmy Durante; “Step Lively” (1944) with Frank Sinatra, giving »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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Gloria DeHaven, Star of Golden Age Movie Musicals, Dies at 91

1 August 2016 8:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Gloria DeHaven, who starred in classic movie musicals in the 1940s and ’50s — mostly for MGM, has died. She was 91.

The actress died Saturday in hospice care in Las Vegas, after suffering a stroke several months ago, her agent told Reuters.

“With Gloria DeHaven’s passing, we have lost another precious link to the classical cinema of yesteryear. Gloria was a talented actor and singer, and she will be sorely missed,” said SAG-aftra President Gabrielle Carteris.

DeHaven, who’s career spanned six decades, embodied Hollywood’s Golden Age with her spunk and charisma.

She made her big-screen debut as a child, playing Paulette Goddard’s younger sister, in Charlie Chaplin’s last silent movie, 1936’s “Modern Times.” DeHaven starred in more than two dozen films, including her breakout role in Lucille Ball’s “Best Foot Forward” (1943); “Two Girls and a Sailor” (1944) with Van Johnson, June Allyson, and Jimmy Durante; “Step Lively” (1944) with Frank Sinatra, »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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Gloria DeHaven, Star of Hollywood Movie Musicals, Dies at 91

1 August 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Gloria DeHaven, famous for starring in a parade of Hollywood musicals in the 1940s and '50s, has died. She was 91. DeHaven died Saturday in hospice care in Las Vegas after suffering a stroke a few months ago, reports Reuters. The actress made her screen debut in Charlie Chaplin's 1936 film Modern Times as Paulette Goddard's younger sister. She went on to star in a bevy of musicals - many of them for MGM - in the 1940s and '50s including Two Girls and a Sailor , Step Lively with Frank Sinatra (who had his first onscreen kiss with »

- Jodi Guglielmi, @JodiGug3

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Interview: Actor Paul Dooley of ‘Breaking Away,’ ‘Sixteen Candles’

21 July 2016 10:25 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – If there ever was a quintessential “Dad” in movies of the last generation, it would have to be Paul Dooley. The comedian and character actor is best known for portraying the patriarch in “Breaking Away” (1979) and “Sixteen Candles” (1984), but was also in director’s Robert Altman’s ‘ensemble’ and has had a stellar career.

The former “Paul Brown” was born in West Virginia, and studied acting at West Virginia University, before heading to New York City and a new career as Paul Dooley. He did stage work, stand-up comedy and the New York City version of The Second City (story below), before getting his big break in the original stage version of “The Odd Couple” in 1965, directed by the legendary Mike Nichols. While working the stage, he appeared in a number of commercials, eventually moving to Los Angeles to “be where the action is.”

The Dad: Paul Dooley, with Dennis Christopher, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Do sequels ever really work when decades have passed since the first film?

27 June 2016 3:15 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I still haven’t seen Independence Day: Resurgence, and there’s a good chance I won’t. When 20th Century Fox made the decision not to screen the film for Us press in advance of the film’s opening, they sent a very clear message to anyone paying attention, and it’s a message that I believe more and more studios would love to send to critics, especially on their giant event films: not only do we not need you, but we don’t want you. At all. And it’s true. Studios don’t really need to screen movies for critics. It’s a professional agreement that we all participate in, but more and more often, studios screen later and almost begrudgingly. I am amazed how many times this year alone I’ve had to basically beg to even find out when or if a screening is happening. The »

- Drew McWeeny

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1997 | 1996

1-20 of 39 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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