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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 25 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Woodman

16 April 2017 3:45 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

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This week sees the 40th anniversary of Woody Allen’s Annie Hall so a career overview for the brilliant humorist/director seems in order.

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Take the Money and Run originally had a different ending that was cut by editor Ralph Rosenblum. What was it?

Woody is killed in a bloody gun ambush. Woody becomes president. Woody appears to tear a hole in the movie screen and “escapes” into the theater. »

- TFH Team

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Universal Monsters: Beauty & The Beast Helmer Bill Condon In Talks To Direct Bride Of Frankenstein

14 April 2017 1:29 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

In a few months, we will be getting a reboot of the Universal monster franchise, The Mummy. This film will kick off a shared universe of monsters that contain such iconic characters as the Invisible Man, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the creature from the Black Lagoon, and of course, Dracula. 

We’ve only seen a teaser and a trailer for one film thus far, but Universal is still starting to put all the other pieces in place in case of success. We already know they’re starting work on other films like The Wolf Man and Van Helsing, but it sounds like they’re already taking some pretty big steps for another film of theirs, Bride of Frankenstein.

According to a new report from Deadline, Bill Condon, the man behind Disney’s latest $1 billion hit Beauty and the Beast, is currently in talks with Universal to helm the adaptation »

- Joseph Medina

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Beauty and the Beast director looks at Bride Of Frankenstein

14 April 2017 12:42 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Bill Condon, who brought Beauty and the Beast to the big screen this year (a film which has now taken over $1 billion at the worldwide box-office), is looking at another big franchise for his next work. Condon may direct Bride Of Frankenstein for Universal, another film in their planned Monsters Universe which kicks off this summer with The Mummy.

Deadline reports the news that Condon, who also directed Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 1 and Part 2, is in talks for the big-budget movie, which is produced by Alex Kurtzman and Chris Morgan from a script by David Koepp.

The film is said to have a feminist angle on the classic tale, which originally starred Elsa Lanchester and Boris Karloff in 1935.

More news as we get it.

The post Beauty and the Beast director looks at Bride Of Frankenstein appeared first on The Hollywood News. »

- Paul Heath

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Beauty And The Beast Director Sets Sights on New Bride Of Frankenstein Film

13 April 2017 8:43 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Bill Condon recently brought an iconic creature to life on the big screen in the live-action Beauty and the Beast movie, and with that film passing the $1 billion milestone at the global box office, the filmmaker could be entering the world of Universal Monsters for his next project.

Deadline reports that Condon is in "early talks" to direct a new Bride of Frankenstein movie for Universal Pictures.

No official deal has been made, but Deadline reveals that both sides are "excited" about teaming up for the film, which would join the upcoming The Mummy (hitting theaters June 9th), the in-the-works Creature from the Black Lagoon, and other projects (including one on Van Helsing) that are part of the revamped Universal Monsters shared cinematic world.

It's also worth noting that The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) is one of Condon's most-loved classic monster films, according to Deadline. The original film starred Elsa Lanchester »

- Derek Anderson

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Bill Condon In Talks To Direct The Bride Of Frankenstein

13 April 2017 7:03 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Hot off the success of the live-action adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, which is now sitting at $1 billion at the worldwide box office, Bill Condon is in talks with Universal to direct their remake of The Bride of Frankenstein. The project is part of the studio’s new cinematic universe, one which features all of their classic monsters and kicks off shortly with the release of The Mummy. From there, we’ll also be getting The Invisible Man, Van Helsing, Creature from the Black Lagoon and many more.

On board to produce The Bride of Frankenstein are Alex Kurtzman and Chris Morgan, with a script from David Koepp that apparently has “kind of a feminist bent to the new story.” The original, which released in 1935 and was directed by James Whale, is a classic of the genre and starred Boris Karloff and Elsa Lanchester. There’s no word yet on casting for the remake, »

- Mark Cassidy

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Exclusive Interview: Jonathan Sothcott for We Still Steal The Old Way

12 April 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

This week sees the release of British action sequel We Still Steal The Old Way on digital download, with DVD and Blu-ray following on 17th April. The film is a follow-up to the 2014 crime drama We Still Kill The Old Way and sees the return of the old-school Archer gang, led by the charismatic Richie Archer, who this time hatches a plan to pull off an audacious robbery. Halfway through the heist, the gang get caught, and they’re sent down. So far, so good – now they’re in prison they can put into motion their plot to spring fellow inmate George, who desperately needs to get out before his wife dies. Trouble arises when Richie’s arch enemy Vic Farrow gets himself transferred into the prison, wanting to settle some old scores.

We caught up with the film’s producer Jonathan Sothcott to talk about his new film, reuniting the cast, »

- Paul Heath

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“Ghost in the Shell” and a Brief Herstory of Whitewashing

11 April 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Scarlett Johansson in “Ghost in the Shell

During its opening weekend, the anticipated yet controversial film “Ghost in the Shell” took home a measly $19 million at the domestic box office. Both domestically and abroad, it’s expected to lose over $60 million total, and that’s got to hurt.

Perhaps you’ve heard of the whitewashing controversy that has followed the film since its casting choices were first announced. Perhaps, by now, you’ve even heard of its bizarre narrative ending that, as The New York Times puts it, “isn’t just appropriation, but obliteration.” That said, we imagine you, too, may have the same question that family and friends have constantly asked us: Why does Hollywood continue to miscast race — and what makes studios think they can successfully get away with it?

The “easy” answer is that, historically, they always have — we don’t need to tell you about Mickey Rooney’s Mr. Yunioshi in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” or Katharine Hepburn in the Oscar-nominated “Dragon Seed.” What’s more difficult is understanding when (and why) yellow face and whitewashing became synonymous with, as Paramount domestic distribution chief Kyle Davies less-than-tactfully just put it, finding a balance between “honoring source material and [making] a movie for a mass audience.” And, just like all matters in Hollywood, this becomes even more complicated when one considers where female stars, female autonomy, and racial tropes specifically fit into this conversation.

Yellow Face: Romance, Desire, and Fear

Mary Pickford in “Madame Butterfly

Though the western image of the Asian woman on the screen may have shifted across spectrums of time, its historical construction has assured its perpetual relationship with the notion of yellow peril. In her book “Romance and the ‘Yellow Peril,’” Gina Marchetti historically traces yellow peril as a 19th-century European concept that, according to Marchetti, “combines racist terror of alien cultures, sexual anxieties, and the belief that the West will be overpowered and enveloped by the irresistible, dark, occult forces of the East.”

In early Hollywood, this was best represented by cinematic romances between the “moral white man” and the “eroticized native woman.” The only way to “properly” reconstruct taboo interracial romances on the screen was through — you’ve guessed it — yellow face. With a little makeup and prosthetics, Caucasian actresses could transform into Asian characters who, more often then not, embodied the supposed seductiveness of the East.

Ironically, Paramount Pictures adopted this tactic as early as 1915 by casting Mary Pickford in “Madame Butterfly.” Pickford’s Japanese character falls in love with a westernized man, and their “racially forbidden” love ends in tragedy. The application of yellow face acts as a reassurance to western ideals: Though, narratively, The Butterfly may obtain the affections of the westernized man, the audience needs not distance itself from this taboo. In reality, it is a love between a Caucasian man and a Caucasian woman, rather than a “true” mixing of the West with the “alien cultures” of the East.

Myrna Loy in “The Mask of Fu Manchu

Yellow face is also arguably responsible for the now-infamous Hollywood image of the erotic Asian woman. Amidst an Asian persona, actresses were able to embrace and reveal a sexual identity that would otherwise be deemed immoral. In a way, some saw this as a rare career opportunity to show something different — and doesn’t that remind you of Johansson’s contemporary comments regarding her own casting?

Before she was the beloved Mrs. Charles of “The Thin Man” series, Myrna Loy embraced this “opportunity” throughout many of her silent films, including “The Crimson City” (in which she was chosen over Anna May Wong), “Thirteen Women,” and “The Mask of Fu Manchu.” Opposite a yellow faced Boris Karloff in “The Mask of Fu Manchu,” Loy plays a “half-naked nymphomaniacal sadist who reaches orgasmic heights when torturing white males.” Thus, in Loy’s case, an “Asian mask” is used to explore both racial stereotypes and female sexual desire — but at a distance guaranteed and controlled by whiteness itself.

Gale Sondergaard and Bette Davis in “The Letter

The 1940s was also full of “rare opportunity” — not for artistry, but rather for country. William Wyler’s “The Letter” stands as one of the first filmic examples of “reaffirmed” yellow peril that persisted throughout World War II. This is seen through deliberate ramifications related to both the script and whitewashed casting — interestingly enough, in the 1929 original, the lead Asian protagonist is actually played by an Asian actress.

Gale Sondergaard’s role as a sinister wife (to Bette Davis’ “other woman”) is far from Pickford’s Butterfly or the overly sexualized Loy — she is truly a figure to be feared and despised, as opposed to conquered or desired. Sondergaard’s character is described as an “oriental villainous snake” deliberately juxtaposed against Davis’ “westernized and pure” feminine woman. Not only is the trope of the “bad Asian” employed and intensified, but the choice to hire a Caucasian actress is directly tied to the the anti-Asian sentiment of the Second World War. Sadly, this 1940s need for audience “familiarity and comfort” speaks volumes to where we still are today.

It’s 2017… We’re Still Talking About This?

Credit: Mdsc

For better or worse, this early industrial history offers a brief glimpse of understanding into this, frankly, screwed up Hollywood mentality.

Just last year, the Media, Diversity, and Social Change (Mdsc) Initiative at USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism found that “at least half or more of all cinematic, television, or streaming stories fail to portray one speaking or named Asian or Asian American on screen.” Over 17 million people in the United States identify as Asian or Asian American. That’s over five percent of the country’s population!

The idea that actually casting Asian characters in Asian roles would repel a mass audience is a dated, Euro-centric cop-out. Newsflash: we don’t always need a Swinton or Stone.

Ghost in the Shell

As for Johansson, The Mary Sue said it best: “she’s one of those few female stars who can open a film, make a huge paycheck, and has a certain level of decision-making power.” Now, let us start by saying that, obviously, we at Women and Hollywood love nothing more than watching other women succeed.

That said, like her predecessors before her, the color of Johansson’s skin grants her a level of star power and opportunity that few others could access or afford. The mere fact that she even can consider her “Ghost in the Shell” character “identity-less” speaks to her racial privilege. Her comments related to this film have consistently (and frustratingly) proven that this history—that whitewashing enables actresses to safely explore personas or opportunities they wouldn’t seek otherwise — is very much ingrained into the media’s industrial mindset.

If producers and studio executives refuse to evolve their ways, then it is up to those of us who have power (like Johansson) to fight for greater intersectionality. Women must lift other women up, and white actresses, in particular, must learn to see past personal opportunity and instead acknowledge that some “unique experiences” simply do not belong to them.

Ghost in the Shell” and a Brief Herstory of Whitewashing was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

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‘The Mummy’ paints it black in newly released trailer

2 April 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

The first time movie audiences were introduced to The Mummy was back in 1932. Played by Boris Karloff, the monster formed part of the now iconic Universal Monsters franchise. Now, almost a hundred years later the studio is once again being exhumed. The series looks to have had quite the face-lift as Tom Cruise will now take on the evil Egyptian, this time played by Sofia Boutella.

Directed by Alex Kurtzman, this will be a modern telling of the story and will see Cruise share the screen with Russell Crowe and Annabelle Wallis. Check out the latest trailer now:

As you can see, we really are a long way from the shuffle-and-moan days. This is a bang up to date Cruise action flick that has summer blockbuster written all over it. Kurtzman may be relatively new to the directing world, but he did write the Star Trek reboot, so he has »

- Kat Hughes

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The Vampire Bat

31 March 2017 8:22 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

 

Another impressive horror restoration! Majestic Pictures pulls together a great cast, including Fay Wray and Lionel Atwill, for a smart gothic horror outing complete with squeaky bats, a flipped-out village idiot (Dwight Frye!), a crazed mad scientist (the worst kind) and a lynch mob with torches that have been hand-tinted in color. Melvyn Douglas is the debonair flatfoot assigned to solve a series of vampire killings.

The Vampire Bat

Blu-ray

The Film Detective

1933 / B&W with part-tinted scene / 1:37 Academy / 83 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / 19.99

Starring: Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray, Melvyn Douglas, Maude Eburne, George E. Stone, Dwight Frye, Robert Frazer, Rita Carlyle, Lionel Belmore, William V. Mong, Stella Adams, Harrison Greene.

Cinematography: Ira H. Morgan

Film Editor: Otis Garrett

Written by Edward T. Lowe Jr.

Produced by Phil Goldstone

Directed by Frank Strayer

 

Hollywood horror was a hot trend in 1932: with the arrival of Frankenstein and Dracula the horror field boomed. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Invisible Ghost

28 March 2017 12:06 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Bela Lugosi fan alert! This Monogram horror opus is yet another narrative-challenged fumble of unmotivated, incomprehensible characters… but Bela’s great in it, in a central role. He’s a sympathetic, non- maniac this time, if you don’t count his tendency to go into trances and smother random houseguests. Savant’s review has the lowdown on the interesting cast; Tom Weaver’s commentary has the authoritative lowdown on whole show.

Invisible Ghost

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 64 min. / Street Date March 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 24.95

Starring: Bela Lugosi, Polly Ann Young, Clarence Muse, John McGuire, Betty Compson, Ernie Adams, Terry Walker, George Pembroke .

Cinematography: Harvey Gould, Marcel Le Picard

Film Editor: Robert Golden

Original Music: hahahahah, good one.

Written by Helen Martin & Al Martin

Produced by Sam Katzman

Directed by Joseph H. Lewis

Horror movie fans come in two varieties, obsessive and dangerously obsessive. Back »

- Glenn Erickson

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SXSW 2017 Interview: Director Dominic Bridges Talks Two Pigeons

24 March 2017 2:43 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

First-time feature filmmaker Dominic Bridges’ dark comedy Two Pigeons recently enjoyed its world premiere at the 2017 SXSW Film Festival. The movie stars Javier Botet as a man so obsessed with his pursuit of revenge that he stealthily moves into the home of his intended victim, a slick real estate agent Hussein (Mim Shaikh), and spends all of his alone time sabotaging the man’s entire life—from his toiletries to his relationships to even his promising career.

Daily Dead recently had the chance to catch up with UK director Bridges about his first time at the helm of a feature film, and he also discussed his approach to the story of Two Pigeons, his experiences working with Botet, and more.

Great to speak with you, Dom. I’d love to start off with where the idea for the story came from, because Orlan is such an interesting character in that »

- Heather Wixson

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Director Robert Day Has Passed Away

21 March 2017 4:56 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

He took viewers into the steamy jungles of Tarzan, the sleek (and foreboding) future of Logan's Run, and a skyscraper under siege by a deadly blaze. Filmmaker Robert Day brought many worlds to life in his career, and it's with great sadness that we inform readers that the director has passed away at the age of 94.

According to THR (via Legacy.com), Day passed away on March 17th on Bainbridge Island in Seattle. A British filmmaker, Day made his mark in the world of directing with four Tarzan movies—Tarzan the Magnificent (1960), Tarzan's Three Challenges (1963), Tarzan and the Valley of Gold (1966), and Tarzan and the Great River (1967)—and he also helmed one episode of the Tarzan TV series in 1966.

Day also directed horror legend Boris Karloff in Corridors of Blood and The Haunted Strangler, and he helmed plenty of other horror and sci-fi projects, including First Man Into Space and Ritual of Evil, »

- Derek Anderson

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Robert Day Dies: Prolific Film & TV Director Was 94

21 March 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Robert Day, the British director whose long list of credits includes multiple 1960s Tarzan movies and dozens of TV series and telefilms, has died. He was 94. His family said Day passed away March 17 on Bainbridge Island near Seattle. Born on September 11, 1922, in Sheen, England, his first film was the dark comedy The Green Man (1956), and from there Day would helm movies starring the likes of Boris Karloff (1958’s The Haunted Strangler and Corridors of Blood), Shirley… »

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Robert Day Dies: Prolific Film & TV Director Was 94

21 March 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Robert Day, the British director whose long list of credits includes multiple 1960s Tarzan movies and dozens of TV series and telefilms, has died. He was 94. His family said Day passed away March 17 on Bainbridge Island near Seattle. Born on September 11, 1922, in Sheen, England, his first film was the dark comedy The Green Man (1956), and from there Day would helm movies starring the likes of Boris Karloff (1958’s The Haunted Strangler and Corridors of Blood), Shirley… »

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Robert Day, Director of Peter Sellers' 'Two-Way Stretch' and Four Tarzan Movies, Dies at 94

21 March 2017 11:43 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Robert Day, the veteran British director who in the 1960s worked on five Tarzan movies and guided Peter Sellers in the delicious comedy Two-Way Stretch, has died. He was 94.

Day, who also helmed two Boris Karloff horror flicks, died Friday on Bainbridge Island in Washington state, his family announced. He worked in the U.S. starting in the 1970s and retired in 1991.

Day was married to bubbly American actress and dancer Dorothy Provine (TV's The Roaring 20's, That Darn Cat!) from 1969 until her death in 2010.

Day directed Gordon Scott as the King of the Jungle »

- Mike Barnes

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Robert Day, Director of Peter Sellers' 'Two-Way Stretch' and Four Tarzan Movies, Dies at 94

21 March 2017 11:43 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Robert Day, the veteran British director who in the 1960s worked on five Tarzan movies and guided Peter Sellers in the delicious comedy Two-Way Stretch, has died. He was 94.

Day, who also helmed two Boris Karloff horror flicks, died Friday on Bainbridge Island in Washington state, his family announced. He worked in the U.S. starting in the 1970s and retired in 1991.

Day was married to bubbly American actress and dancer Dorothy Provine (TV's The Roaring 20's, That Darn Cat!) from 1969 until her death in 2010.

Day directed Gordon Scott as the King of the Jungle »

- Mike Barnes

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Dracula and The Mummy Legacy Collection Blu-rays Coming This May

23 February 2017 11:52 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Last fall, Universal Studios Home Entertainment gave horror fans an early Halloween treat with their Complete Legacy Collection Blu-ray box sets for Frankenstein's monster and The Wolf Man. This spring, two more Universal Monsters will get their due, as Dracula and The Mummy are also getting the Complete Legacy Collection Blu-ray treatment.

The respective Complete Legacy Collection Blu-ray box sets for Dracula and The Mummy are scheduled for a May 16th release. Although the full list of films for each collection have not been announced, it's likely that they will contain the same films featured on the DVD versions:

Dracula Complete Legacy Collection:

Dracula (1931) Dracula's Daughter Son of Dracula House of Frankenstein House of Dracula Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Dracula (1931) - Spanish version

The Mummy Complete Legacy Collection:

The Mummy (1932) The Mummy's Hand The Mummy's Tomb The Mummy's Ghost The Mummy's Curse Abbott and Costello Meet The Mummy

And for additional details, »

- Derek Anderson

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‘Tower of London’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

13 February 2017 10:01 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Vincent Price, Michael Pate, Joan Freeman, Robert Brown, Bruce Gordon, Joan Camden, Richard Hale, Sandra Knight, Charles Macaulay, Justice WatsonSarah Selby, Donald Losby | Written by Leo Gordon, F. Amos Powell | Directed by Roger Corman

When you get Roger Corman and Vince Price together you tend to get a stylised horror film that is hard not to love. While Tower of London may not be their best collaboration, it is an interesting take on Shakespeare’s play of the nefarious King who killed his way to the top…

Corman’s film though is a more mix-and-match tale for Richard III which pulls in Macbeth and Hamlet to make the tale much more ghoulish. Featuring ghosts that haunt Vincent Price’s Richard of Gloucester it is very clear that Price relishes the prospect of taking on a Shakespearian role, but hams it up for all it is worth.

Price does this »

- Paul Metcalf

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Watch Robert Englund Become Freddy Krueger in Nightmares In The Makeup Chair Documentary Trailer

1 February 2017 5:18 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Robert Englund may have hung up his bladed glove on the big screen after Freddy vs. Jason, but not long ago, the legendary actor was transformed into the boogeyman from Elm Street once again by makeup maestro Robert Kurtzman, and the fascinating process will be featured in the new documentary Nightmares in the Makeup Chair.

You can get a sneak peek at director Mike Kerz’s Nightmares in the Makeup Chair in the images and trailer below, and look for it to premiere at a yet-to-be-announced film festival sometime this year.

Press Release: Robert Englund is back in the Freddy Krueger makeup in the new documentary “Nightmares In The Makeup Chair”. Fans will enter the makeup room and see the entire process as special makeup effects artist Robert Kurtzman transforms Robert Englund into Freddy Krueger once again!

Robert Englund takes fans on an exciting, funny, and emotional journey through his »

- Derek Anderson

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Robert Englund Returns as Freddy Krueger in New Elm Street Documentary Trailer

1 February 2017 1:31 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Robert Englund is back in the Freddy Krueger makeup in the new documentary Nightmares In the Makeup Chair, with the first trailer and poster debuting today. Fans will enter the makeup room and see the entire process as special makeup effects artist Robert Kurtzman transforms Robert Englund into Freddy Krueger once again! Robert Englund takes fans on an exciting, funny, and emotional journey through his years as Freddy Krueger with stories and anecdotes, all while paying tribute to the legacy of Wes Craven. Here's what Robert Englund had to say in his statement.

"Nightmares In the Makeup Chair is my love letter to the Nightmare on Elm Street series and to practical makeup. I've always been in awe of the multi-talented makeup effects artists. From sketching to sculpting, they realize the design. Then to the fine precision of the molding and the manufacturing of the makeup appliances which are nearly paper thin. »

- MovieWeb

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998

1-20 of 25 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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