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1-20 of 67 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Why Are The Best Film Editors Female?

20 November 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week, Neil Calloway looks at why so many great films were cut by women…

You may not have noticed in among all news reports about Jackie Chan being awarded one, but last week Anne V. Coates was given an Honorary Oscar. You might not know her name, but you certainly know her work.

Coates has worked as a film editor since the 1950s, cutting everything from Lawrence of Arabia to Fifty Shades of Grey (one of them is about a guy who keep his love for flagellation secret, and the other is Fifty Shades of Grey). She’s had a remarkable career, and though she’s one of only a small number of female editors, they all seem to be among the best in the business.

Last year, one film swept the board when it came to awards for best editing; Mad Max: Fury Road, a film that is »

- Neil Calloway

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Dante Spinotti on Technology, New Workflow, Directors’ Personalities

18 November 2016 1:01 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Bydgoszcz, Poland — Dante Spinotti, who served as a jurist on this year’s Cinematographers’ Debuts Competition at the Camerimage film festival, is a firm believer that changing technology benefits filmmaking at all levels.

The Italian-born Dp, who has credits that go back to the 1970s, says that the advent of digital tools has democratized entry into the profession as small, inexpensive, and easily available cameras have made it possible for anyone to create moving images.

But if technology is more plentiful, talent is not. “What has not changed is that good ideas are just as difficult as they’ve always been. Anyone can push a button, but what’s important is what’s inside their heads.”

Spinotti’s enthusiasm for digital extends all the way from production through exhibition.

For example, he welcomes the presence of on-set monitors and how directors and crew today can view and evaluate material immediately after shooting it. »

- Peter Caranicas

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'8 Mile' Director Curtis Hanson -- Generous Will Covers His Kid and Many More

13 November 2016 12:20 AM, PST | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

"8 Mile" director Curtis Hanson had a solid will in place before his September death that not only took care of his longtime companion and son, but also his extended fam and his movie biz. Curtis and partner Rebecca Yeldham never tied the knot but have a 12-year-old son together, and the Oscar winner left most of his estate to them, including a home in Laguna Beach. He set up a trust for Rebecca, the kid and several other family members. »

- TMZ Staff

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Isabelle Huppert on How She Tackles Difficult Roles Like ‘Elle’

10 November 2016 9:45 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whereas every other celebrity who visited the sixth-floor Variety Studio at the Toronto Film Festival arrived by elevator, Isabelle Huppert took the stairs — which says a lot about the French star. With a genuine shot at an Oscar nod this year for her daring role in Sony Pictures Classics’ “Elle,” the 63-year-old — who has more nominations for France’s top award, the César, than any other actress (15) — never takes the easy route.

While many actors run from provocative, erotic, or otherwise risqué roles, Huppert is drawn to them — from her early, sexy career turns in  “Going Places” and “Coup de torchon” to her most recent Cannes sensation, “Elle,” in which she plays the co-founder of a successful video-game company who reacts in an unexpected way after she is violently raped. At first, the character goes on with her life as if nothing had happened; then, after discovering the identity of her attacker, »

- Peter Debruge

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‘All We Had’ Trailer: Katie Holmes’ Directorial Debut Follows a Mother and Daughter In Search of a Better Life

2 November 2016 12:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last year, actress Katie Holmes co-starred in two films — “Woman in Gold” and “Touched by Fire” — and had a recurring role on the Showtime series “Ray Donovan.” Now, her feature-length directorial debut “All We Had” is about to hit theaters early next month. Watch the trailer for the film below.

Read More: Review: Katie Holmes’ Directorial Debut ‘All We Had’ Proves She Has Promise Behind the Camera

Based on Annie Weatherwax’s 2014 novel by the same name, the film follows young mother Rita (Holmes) and her fifteen-year-old daughter Ruthie (Stefania Owen) as they search for a better life. They soon find themselves living in a beat-up car and heading east, but when the money runs out and the car breaks down, they become stranded in a small town where Rita lands a steady waitressing job. Eventually, they begin to develop a family with the townsfolk. The film co-stars Richard Kind »

- Vikram Murthi

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Danny DeVito talks highlights, 'Triplets' and directing again

31 October 2016 11:14 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Screen interviewed the Us multi-hyphenate who this week receives an Honorary Award in Mallorca.

Danny DeVito has got virtually all bases covered: from stage to screen, shorts to features, comedy to prestige drama.

One of the world’s most recognizable movie stars, the Batman Returns, Twins and L.A. Confidential actor has directed hits includingThrow Momma From The Train and Matilda while producer credits include Oscar winnner Erin Brockovich and Pulp Fiction (as an executive producer). More recently he has starred in long-running FX series It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia.

Across a career spanning almost 50 years, DeVito has been there, done it and got the t-shirt.

The Hollywood icon will be in Spain this week where he is being presented with with the Evolution Mallorca International Film Festival’s (Emiff, November 3-12) Honorary Award in recognition of his career.

DeVito will present screenings of The War Of The Roses and his new short film Curmudgeons, which »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Ridley Scott Feted by Matt Damon, Russell Crowe and Sigourney Weaver

15 October 2016 5:32 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

“Let’s grab this night by the pussy,” said Russell Crowe, exhorting the Beverly Hilton ballroom attendees at the annual American Cinematheque Ball to go out and vote on election day. Then the night’s charming master of ceremonies got down to the business at hand: tributing director Ridley Scott.

Crowe reminded us that Scott made his first feature film at 40—and showed us his delightful black and white 1962 “Boy and Bicycle” short student film, shot on a borrowed 16mm camera and starring his younger brother by six years, Tony, who also became a director.

At night’s end, when grateful “The Martian” Oscar nominee Matt Damon presented Scott, 78, with his award,  Scott tracked back in time, recalling how he wasn’t a very good student, hard as he tried, and the teacher who suggested that he go to art school. Scott attended the Royal College of Art and studied film, »

- Anne Thompson

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Ridley Scott Feted by Matt Damon, Russell Crowe and Sigourney Weaver

15 October 2016 5:32 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Let’s grab this night by the pussy,” said Russell Crowe, exhorting the Beverly Hilton ballroom attendees at the annual American Cinematheque Ball to go out and vote on election day. Then the night’s charming master of ceremonies got down to the business at hand: tributing director Ridley Scott.

Crowe reminded us that Scott made his first feature film at 40—and showed us his delightful black and white 1962 “Boy and Bicycle” short student film, shot on a borrowed 16mm camera and starring his younger brother by six years, Tony, who also became a director.

At night’s end, when grateful “The Martian” Oscar nominee Matt Damon presented Scott, 78, with his award,  Scott tracked back in time, recalling how he wasn’t a very good student, hard as he tried, and the teacher who suggested that he go to art school. Scott attended the Royal College of Art and studied film, »

- Anne Thompson

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Russell Crowe, Matt Damon Toast Ridley Scott at American Cinematheque Fete

14 October 2016 11:55 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If director Ridley Scott didn’t get his fill of lifetime achievement recognition during last year’s awards season, when his film “The Martian” was on a crash course with Oscar night, the American Cinematheque was ready and willing to oblige.

The org honored Scott with its 30th annual honor Friday night. Actor Russell Crowe served as host of the evening’s festivities.

“At this point it’s very clear that Ridley Scott is a filmmaker with the talent to do anything he wants in any genre you care to mention,” Crowe said. “From film noir to fantasy, from comedy to crime, from period pieces to the distant future, this man can do it all … He not only knows the language of film, he speaks all of its dialects. He speaks camera, editing, grip, gaffer, hair, makeup, all of those things — and he’s getting better at speaking actor.”

A »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Awards Roundup: Annette Bening to Receive AFI Tribute, Shirley MacLaine Honored With Lafca Award and More

14 October 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our weekly Awards Roundup column.

– The American Film Institute will honor actress Annette Bening with a tribute at AFI Fest on Wednesday, November 16 followed by a gala screening of her new film, “20th Century Women,” written and directed by Mike Mills. The tribute will celebrate her career and include a conversation with the actress.

Read More: Awards Roundup: Diane Keaton to Receive AFI Life Achievement Award, Documentary Awards to Honor Norman Lear And More

Annette Bening is a modern-day icon of American cinema,” AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga said in a statement. “In ’20th Century Women,’ she finds one of her richest roles yet, delivering a strong performance that anchors the film’s terrific ensemble cast.”

Bening has been nominated for an Academy Award four times, for her performances in “The Grifters” (1990), “American Beauty” (1999), “Being Julia” (2004) and “The Kids Are All Right »

- Graham Winfrey

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This Week’s Wamg Podcast – Birth Of A Nation, Denial, Deepwater Horizon, and More

3 October 2016 11:34 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

This week’s episode of our podcast We Are Movie Geeks The Show is up! Hear Wamg’s Cate Marquis, Jim Batts and Tom Stockman talk movies. We’ll discuss the weekend box office and review The Birth Of A Nation, Denial, Deepwater Horizon, Miss Peregrines School For Peculiar Children, Storks, Masterminds, Come What May and Operation Avalanche. We’ll talk about all the movie-related events going on in St. Louis and we’ll pay tribute to the late directors Curtis Hanson and Herschell Gordon Lewis.

Here’s this week’s show. Have a listen:

http://www.wearemoviegeeks.com/wp-content/uploads/WAMG10-3-54.mp3

 

The post This Week’s Wamg Podcast – Birth Of A Nation, Denial, Deepwater Horizon, and More appeared first on We Are Movie Geeks.

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- Movie Geeks

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The Good, The Bad & The Badass: Emily Blunt

3 October 2016 8:21 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Last week, we devoted the column to the late director Curtis Hanson. This week we move back in-front of the camera to examine the filmography of one of the most exciting young actresses in the biz... Emily Blunt Very few recent stars have had as interesting a career trajectory as Emily Blunt. Having made a huge impression as Meryl Streep’s bitchy English-accented assistant in The Devil Wears... Read More »

- Chris Bumbray

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Scenic Routes: The late Curtis Hanson staged a murder scene for the ages in L.A. Confidential

29 September 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

In Scenic Routes, Mike D’Angelo looks at key scenes, explaining how they work and what they mean.

When the sad news broke last week that Curtis Hanson died, it occurred to me that I’ve unconsciously associated Hanson with death for almost 20 years now. Odd, because his movies aren’t generally violent. Indeed, they aren’t generally anything, really, apart from “worth seeing.” (Notable exception: 2007’s poker drama Lucky You, which decisively contradicts its own title.) Hanson did make a string of thrillers in the early ’90s—Bad Influence, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle, The River Wild—but those are primarily tension machines; only Cradle has a decent body count, and its deaths are too cartoonishly lurid to rattle anyone. The rest of Hanson’s oeuvre is less bloody still, ranging from the teen sex comedy Losin’ It (starring a not-yet-famous Tom Cruise) to Eminem’s ...

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- Mike D'Angelo

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The Good, The Bad & The Badass: Curtis Hanson

26 September 2016 8:10 AM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

After a couple of weeks off to cover the Toronto International Film Festival, we’re back with The Good, The Bad & The Badass, covering the passing of a great director... Curtis Hanson For much of his career, Curtis Hanson was a journeyman director. He was about as good or as bad as his material, capable of putting-out crowd-pleasing thrillers like The Hand That Rocks The Cradle or The... Read More »

- Chris Bumbray

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Director Curtis Hanson Dies at Age 71

22 September 2016 11:09 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

 

One of the most celebrated film makers of the last four decades has died. Here’s how the New York Times reported it….

Curtis Hanson, the film director whose adaptation of the James Ellroy noir novel “L.A. Confidential” won him an Academy Award, died on Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 71.

The death was confirmed by Officer Jenny Houser, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Police Department. She said that officers had been called to the house shortly before 5 p.m., and that Mr. Hanson had died of natural causes.

Julie Mann, his business manager, said Mr. Hanson had been struggling for some time with a form of dementia.

 

 

Let’s take a look at his long career. His first screen credit is for helping to adapt H.P. Lovecraft’s short story in the 1970 American International Pictures’ The Dunwich Horror starring Sandra Dee and Dean Stockwell. »

- Jim Batts

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Curtis Hanson Remembered: A Filmmaker Who Was Also a Movie Lover

21 September 2016 5:35 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

“Who else could win Oscars for both Bob Dylan and Eminem?” read one of the many elegies for Curtis Hanson that popped up among the screenwriters in my Facebook news feed. That interesting musical two-fer — Dylan won a Best Song Academy Award for Hanson’s 2000 dramedy “Wonder Boys,” and Eminem topped the same category two years later for “8 Mile” — speaks to the eclectic nature of Hanson as a filmmaker, one who couldn’t be easily categorized. If there’s a through-line to the life and work of the man who passed away this week at the age of 71, it’s. »

- Alonso Duralde

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Curtis Hanson: A Craftsman Who, in Two Movies, Touched Greatness

21 September 2016 2:09 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Directing movies, Quentin Tarantino has said, “is a young man’s game. Directors don’t really get better as they get older…I’ve been studying all these directors’ careers, and boy, you tell me the one I haven’t thought of and I’ll bow my head.” Tarantino is right. For the most part, directors don’t get better as they get older. (The rare ones remain just as good.) There are exceptions to that rule, however, and none may be more dramatic, in its way, than the career of Curtis Hanson, who died Tuesday at 71.

For a long time, he worked under the radar. Then, in his forties, when he’d achieved a certain medium-grade commercial success, it was for making a handful of serviceable if not exactly indelible genre movies: the yuppie exploitation noir “Bad Influence” (1990), which played — with an entertaining hint of crassness — off the Rob Lowe sex-tape scandal. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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R.I.P. Curtis Hanson

21 September 2016 2:00 PM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Last night, the cinematic world lost one of its own. Filmmaker Curtis Hanson passed away at the age of 71. The cause of death has been placed as natural causes. Hanson worked in the industry for well over 40 years, writing and directing movies that will stand the test of time. Oscar took notice in the late 90’s when Hanson made what most consider to be his masterpiece with L.A. Confidential, but he was a well known artist before then. He worked steadily on the big screen, also putting out the top notch HBO TV movie Too Big to Fail about five years ago. He will be missed in a big way. Hanson was an Academy Award winner and three time nominee, all for L.A. Confidential back in 1997. That highly regarded crime drama was a tale of corruption in the 1950’s, looking at how very different policemen dealt with enforcing the law. »

- Joey Magidson

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'L.A. Confidential' Director Curtis Hanson Has Died at 71

21 September 2016 1:05 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Curtis Hanson, who won an Oscar for co-writing his film L.A. Confidential, died yesterday at the age of 71. The exact cause is unknown, but the director had been retired due to Alzheimer's disease and had suffered from heart problems in recent years. His final film was 2011's Chasing Mavericks, which he had to exit before finishing and leave to Michael Apted to complete. But he's left behind a wealth of work that also includes the excellent Wonder Boys and the Eminem-led 8 Mile, based on the rapper's own life.  Hanson came up in familiar fashion for filmmakers of his generation. Before becoming a director, he worked for Cinema magazine as a photographer and through his pictures helped land Faye Dunaway her breakout role...

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- Christopher Campbell

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Curtis Hanson (1945-2016)

21 September 2016 1:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Director Curtis Hanson passed away yesterday at the age of 71. Word is that Alzheimer had forced a retirement five years ago.

Eminem won a Song Oscar for his collaboration with Curtis Hanson in "8 Mile"

Hanson's brush with A list "prestige" was brief (3 Oscar nominations for producing, co-writing, and directing the much-admired La Confidential) but his career was a fine example of versatile craftsmanship. He served as an important reminder that there's more to directing than auteurial stamps »

- NATHANIEL R

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