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Adam Driver: ‘Compared with the military, acting isn't that difficult’

The Star Wars actor on leaving the Marines, filming nude scenes with Lena Dunham and getting in touch with his dark side

Adam Driver has a reputation for being a serious young man, which is partly a matter of attitude and partly, I suspect, to do with some aspect of his physiognomy: he has a large head and outsize features that somehow combine to give an impression of gravity. Before the photoshoot, he let it be known that he finds it uncomfortable to have a journalist (me) in his sightline on set, the kind of specification one might expect of a particularly precious Hollywood star. But this turns out to be misleading. Driver’s discomfort is with the entire celebrity aspect of his job, which makes talking about his role in the latest Star Wars trilogy somewhat tricky. I don’t even know where to start with The Last Jedi,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘My Life as a Zucchini,’ ‘Revolting Rhymes’ Top European Animation Awards

‘My Life as a Zucchini,’ ‘Revolting Rhymes’ Top European Animation Awards
Lille, France — “My Life as a Zucchini” and “Revolting Rhymes” topped the first European Animation Awards in Lille, France, on Friday night, scooping best feature and best TV/broadcast production respectively.

Already scoring an Academy Award nomination, Swiss Claude Barras’ “My Life as a Zucchini,” a nonsaccharine, though stop-motion, portrayal of orphanhood, took three awards in all, more than any other title at Lille, winning for best feature animation, and also for its guitar soundtrack and writing, a win for Celine Sciamma, a distinguished director in her own right.

A two-part CGI special produced by Magic Light Pictures for the BBC and created by Magic Light Pictures in Berlin and Triggerfish Animation Studios in Cape Town, “Revolting Rhymes’” took the big TV award for its stylish dramatization of Roald Dahl’s poem reprises of traditional fairy tales. It also won best character design in a TV series.

In one of the most interesting decisions of Academy voters
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Is John Cena Teasing That He’ll Play Dr. Manhattan In HBO’s Watchmen Series?

Back in the 1990s and mid-2000s, Watchmen was stuck in development hell. Director Terry Gilliam made many attempts to get his take off the ground but just couldn’t make it work, eventually trying to pitch his project as a five episode miniseries. At the time, the TV production landscape was drastically different and, understandably, no studio was willing to risk a big budget superhero miniseries full of expensive special effects. Then Zack Snyder came along and the rest is history.

Snyder’s take on Watchmen just didn’t seem to understand what Alan Moore was trying to say in his comic, though. Instead, it inserted distractingly gory action and one of the most ludicrous sex scenes ever committed to celluloid. I’ll give it some kudos, though, as Jackie Earle Haley was an excellent Rorschach and the Koyaanisqatsi soundtracked Dr. Manhattan origin scene was brilliant.

But now, against the odds,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Triumphant Return of the 80’s Style Synth Score!

Tom Jolliffe takes a look at the return to popularity of the 80’s style synthesizer score…

Cinema and the orchestra have had a long-standing relationship. Over the years the big screen has been almost as much about the accompanying music as the film. When someone like John Williams creates iconic, rousing, emotional, bombastic and beautifully crafted scores like Star Wars, Superman and Indiana Jones, it enraptures an audience.

In the late 60’s, through the 70’s, people began toying with synthesizers more and more to create sound scapes and scores. Other wordly, and more ambient and enveloping than emotionally manipulative. They lacked a certain refined quality that the Orchestral score would give you but that sound in its own way (and in the right film) worked. Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells as a companion piece to The Exorcist is supremely effective and iconic. Or Wendy Carlos and the score for The Shining.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Terry Gilliam provides an update on The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

Having wrapped production this summer, Terry Gilliam has been chatting to The New York Times about his long-gestating passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, with the filmmaker revealing that he’s completed a rough cut which has been garnering a very positive response from those who have seen it.

“We’ve almost finished the cut,” said Gilliam. “We’re just fiddling now, figuring out a few things here and there so it’s pretty much what it is. We’ve got still months of work to do on visual effects, sound, music. But as far as the tale, it’s pretty tight now and it’s surprisingly wonderful. I always hesitate to get too optimistic or too excited about the work I’m doing. I’d rather try to stay cynical and slightly distant from it. When you fall in love with something, it’s painful when it
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Hell Freezes Over As Terry Gilliam Nears Completion of ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’

  • Slash Film
Hell Freezes Over As Terry Gilliam Nears Completion of ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’
It’s hard to believe, but director Terry Gilliam has been working on The Man Who Killed Don Quixote for almost 20 years. After one setback after another, with bad luck compounding bad luck, it looks as if Gilliam might buck the odds and finally release the film for the world to see. The filmmaker recently revealed […]

The post Hell Freezes Over As Terry Gilliam Nears Completion of ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Blu-ray Review: Terry Gilliam's Jabberwocky on Criterion, Vital, Promising, More Quirky Than Funny

Surprise! The delightful, self-deprecating audio commentary by Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin is what sold me on Jabberwocky, a very British film loosely inspired by Lewis Carroll's poem. Released in the U.K. and the U.S. in April 1977 -- two months before Star Wars -- the film was savaged by critics, as Gilliam recalls, though it did better in territories where Monty Python and the Holy Grail had not been released, such as Germany. Indeed, the original release did not leave a mark in my memory, though I recall it frequently playing on the lively repertory circuit in Los Angeles in the late 1970s and early 80s. Of course, I was a latecomer to the entire Monty Python phenomenon, since the show was broadcast on...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Terry Gilliam's Man Who Killed Don Quixote Is Almost Ready After 20 Years

Terry Gilliam's Man Who Killed Don Quixote Is Almost Ready After 20 Years
More than 17 years after first trying to get his passion project, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, off the ground, director Terry Gilliam is finalizing his cut of the movie, and it may be ready to hit theaters next year. The Man Who Killed Don Quixote wrapped production in June, with one of its cast members, Oscar Jaenada, revealing in a September interview that they're planning a world premiere at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. While that debut has not yet been confirmed, director Terry Gilliam revealed in a new interview that he has almost finished assembling the cut. Here's what he had to say below.

"Well, we've almost finished the cut. We're just fiddling now, figuring out a few things here and there so it's pretty much what it is. We've got still months of work to do on visual effects, sound, music. But as far as the tale, it's
See full article at MovieWeb »

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Could Debut At Cannes 2018

After countless attempts of bringing the project to the screen, Terry Gilliam has revealed that he has almost finished his final cut of The Man Who Killed Dox Quixote and it could be headed for the south of France in May. He’s tried to make the film for the last 17 years, but now it’s well in the can and could indeed be heading for Cannes.

A scene from the 2002 documentary Lost In La Mancha

“Well, we’ve almost finished the cut,” he told The New York Times. “We’re just fiddling now, figuring out a few things here and there so it’s pretty much what it is. We’ve got still months of work to do on visual effects, sound, music. But as far as the tale, it’s pretty tight now and it’s surprisingly wonderful.”

The film sees Jonathan Pryce play the title role, with Adam Driver,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

New Us Home Video Releases for the Week of November 21st, 2017

This week we are seeing some incredible releases from the various Us distributors. The Criterion Collection is releasing the new restoration of Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky, Kino has a massive new set of Fritz Lang films, and Bertrand Tavernier’s new documentary, My Journey Through French Cinema is finally out from Cohen.

Beach Rats (Blu-ray) $22.99 $29.98 8 new from $21.86 2 used from $21.85 Buy Now Amazon.com Free shipping Cease Fire - 3D [Blu-ray] $21.99 $34.95 9 new from $21.89 1 used from $22.37 Buy Now Amazon.com Free shipping Driftwood [Blu-ray] $18.29 $29.95 11 new from $16.04 2 used from $16.03 Buy Now Amazon.com Free shipping Fritz Lang: The Silent Films [Blu-ray] $107.14 3 new from $107.14 Buy Now Amazon.com Good Time [Blu-ray] $17.69 $24.99 13 new from $16.97 4 used from $16.96 Buy Now Amazon.com Free shipping Hangover Square [Blu-ray] $18.69 $29.95 11 new from $16.04 2 used from $16.03 Buy Now Amazon.com Free shipping Jabberwocky (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray] $22.09 $39.95 12 new from $19.97 4 used from $20.75 Buy Now Amazon.com Free shipping Jerome Bixby's The Man From Earth: Special Edition [Blu-ray + DVD] $21.41 $39.95 8 new
See full article at CriterionCast »

Terry Gilliam Has a Great ‘Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Update: ‘We’ve Almost Finished the Cut’

Terry Gilliam Has a Great ‘Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Update: ‘We’ve Almost Finished the Cut’
The roller-coaster ride to finish the often-cursed “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has some promising developments. Terry Gilliam has been wanting to make the movie for the last 17 years, first trying and failing to mount a production in 2000, but he now says he is nearly finished with the cut and is ready to begin adding music and VFX.

Read More:Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’: 6 Pivotal Moments in the ‘Cursed’ Passion Project

“Well, we’ve almost finished the cut,” he told The New York Times. “We’re just fiddling now, figuring out a few things here and there so it’s pretty much what it is. We’ve got still months of work to do on visual effects, sound, music. But as far as the tale, it’s pretty tight now and it’s surprisingly wonderful.”

Gilliam announced at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival that
See full article at Indiewire »

Terry Gilliam Says ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Is “Surprisingly Wonderful”

There’s nothing better than a good redemption story, and we’re rooting for Terry Gilliam to finally let go of the cross he’s had to bear with “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.” We won’t rehash the tortured history of the movie, but after years of disaster, curses, bad luck, and awful timing, he’s finally made the movie. The picture is in post-production with work still be done, but Gilliam has already started screening the movie for those in his circle, and response has been positive.

Continue reading Terry Gilliam Says ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Is “Surprisingly Wonderful” at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Writer Roundtable: Jordan Peele, Aaron Sorkin and More Explain Why the Job Feels Like "Exorcising a Demon"

Writer Roundtable: Jordan Peele, Aaron Sorkin and More Explain Why the Job Feels Like
mother!), 48, liked the idea of breaking bread with writer-director Werner Herzog, with whom he once shared a place at a THR roundtable, and added two other European auteurs, Federico Fellini and Terry Gilliam. German writer-director Fatih Akin (In the Fade), 44, opted for three women, all actresses: Marlene Dietrich, Audrey Hepburn and Marilyn Monroe. Emily V. Gordon (The Big Sick), 38, chose...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

New UK Home Video Releases for the Week of November 20th, 2017

This week features several must-own/import titles for our friends in the UK and those with region-free players elsewhere in the world. While there are many more titles out this week, I’ve highlighted nine titles that our readers will appreciate.

This week the Criterion Collection is releasing Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky in the UK and the Us. The BFI is putting out Jacques Rivette’s Celine and Julie Go Boating. Artificial Eye is releasing a mammoth 10-disc box set of the films of Aki Kaurismaki.

The folks from Arrow are releasing a non-limited version of their new 4K restoration of John Carpenter’s The Thing, along with Steve Buscemi’s Animal Factory (this will see a Us release next week from Arrow). Indicator is releasing Wolf and The Eyes of Laura Mars, both region-free. The Masters of Cinema are finally releasing their Buster Keaton box set and

The Aki Kaurismäki
See full article at CriterionCast »

Trafalgar Releasing Scoops ‘Monty Python’s Life of Brian’ Ahead of Anniversary (Exclusive)

Trafalgar Releasing Scoops ‘Monty Python’s Life of Brian’ Ahead of Anniversary (Exclusive)
Trafalgar Releasing has acquired worldwide theatrical rights (except North America and selected others) to “Monty Python’s Life of Brian” ahead of a push to put the iconic comedy back in cinemas next year to mark its 40th anniversary. The deal sees most of the global rights sit with one distributor, whereas in the past there was a patchwork of deals in place.

Trafalgar, which was Picture House Entertainment before a management buyout and rebrand, has worked with the Python team before, on the theatrical release of 2014’s live show “Monty Python Live (mostly) – One Down Five to Go.” It registered 330,000 admissions globally.

“Monty Python’s Life of Brian” was the second major film from the comedy troupe and is a scathing satire of both religion and Hollywood’s depiction of all things biblical. It will be back in cinemas next year as part of a program of celebrations around the 40th anniversary.

The film fared
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Star Wars’ Producer Kathleen Kennedy Honored by Art Directors Guild

‘Star Wars’ Producer Kathleen Kennedy Honored by Art Directors Guild
The Art Directors Guild has selected “Star Wars” producer Kathleen Kennedy, as the recipient of its Cinematic Imagery Award.

The guild will present the honor Jan. 27 at its 22nd Annual Art Directors Guild.s Excellence in Production Design Awards. The event will be held at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood and Highland.

Adg President Nelson Coates said, “We are thrilled to recognize the amazing contributions Kathleen Kennedy has made to narrative design for more than three decades, while so beautifully creating a cinematic legacy as represented by some of the most successful movies of our time.”

“Ms. Kennedy is truly a significant role model,” Coates added. “Her creative legacy and professional journey is an inspirational example to all young artists who are in search of a meaningful career in the entertainment industry. Through her perseverance, talent and leadership, she has become an icon elevating the art of production design. She continues
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Forgotten: Jan Lenica's "Labyrinth" (1963)

  • MUBI
Labyrinth, by Polish graphic designer and animator Jan Lenica, is one of numerous disparate works of its period which looks like a direct inspiration for Terry Gilliam's Monty Python cut-out animations. There was a lot of this sort of thing around at the time. And, as is clear from this short, the collage form of surrealism can be dated back to Max Ernst's prints: crazy, absurd, deadpan, delirious and disturbing.The opening scene, which uses fuller animation to show a bowler-hatted Victorian gent flying through the clouds in a kind of winged harness, does seem like a clear precursor to Brazil's flying knight fantasy sequences. But what follows is more peculiar still.While following our dapper aviator as he ditches the wings and goes for a stroll in a city constructed from tinted and smudgy old photos, we start to linger on stray images and bits of
See full article at MUBI »

‘The Spiderwebhouse (Im Spinnwebhaus)’ Review

Stars: Ben Litwinschuh, Lutz Simon Eilert, Helena Pieske, Ludwig Trepte, Sylvie Testud | Written by Johanna Stuttmann | Directed by Mara Eibl-Eibesfeldt

We first see Sabine (Sylvie Testud) in happier times, frolicking with her three young kids: Jonas (Ben Litwinschuh), Nick (Lutz Simon Eilert) and Miechen (Helena Pieske). But Sabine, suffering with mental health problems, can’t cope with her parental responsibilities. The father is well-meaning, although any assistance is strictly of the remote, debit card variety. One day, Sabine books herself into hospital to get over her “demons”, leaving Jonas, the eldest, in charge.

After the initial thrill of adult-free independence, the house falls into disrepair. While scavenging in bins, Jonas meets Felix (Ludwig Trepte), who becomes a kind of mentor. Felix mocks Jonas – he calls him “Dwarf” – but they strike up an awkward friendship. Despite Jonas’s best efforts, his siblings are ill and starving and their home is becoming shrouded in cobwebs.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Counterpart’ Trailer: New Starz Thriller From ‘The Jungle Book’ Writer Looks Truly Crazypants

‘Counterpart’ Trailer: New Starz Thriller From ‘The Jungle Book’ Writer Looks Truly Crazypants
To say we fully understand what’s in store when the upcoming Starz drama “Counterpart” premieres would be a lie. But it’s nothing short of intriguing. The high-concept drama, starring J.K. Simmons, is described as follows:

Counterpart” is about a mysterious world hidden beneath the surface of our everyday existence. Howard Silk (J.K. Simmons) is a lowly cog in the bureaucratic machinery of a Berlin-based United Nations spy agency. When Howard discovers that his organization safeguards the secret of a crossing into a parallel dimension, he is thrust into a shadow world of intrigue, danger, and double cross… where the only man he can trust is his near-identical counterpart from this parallel world. The show explores themes of identity, fate and lost love, posing the eternal question, “what if our lives could have been different?”

Read More:‘American Gods’: No Word on When to Expect Season 2, But Starz
See full article at Indiewire Television »
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