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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 42 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Silence’ Cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto to Make Directorial Debut

23 March 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, who was nominated for an Oscar for shooting Martin Scorsese’s “Silence,” will make his directorial debut with the revenge-thriller “Bastard.”

La La Land’s” Jordan Horowitz is producing through his Original Headquarters company. Scorsese and Emma Tillinger Koskoff of Sikelia Prods. are executive producing. Topic, First Look Media’s entertainment studio, is financing.

Prieto will direct from an original script penned by Bill Gullo. Production is planned to start in the first quarter of 2018. Adam Pincus and Annie Marter will oversee for Topic.

“Bastard” is set against a looming flood that will ravage the small town of Bird’s Point, Mo.

“It’s an honor to get to make this picture alongside my terrific partners at Topic and First Look Media,” Horowitz said. “Rodrigo’s work as a cinematographer has consistently floored me, and putting him behind the camera to direct Bill’s absorbing script has »

- Dave McNary

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Psychic Scars and Something Wild: A Conversation with Dramatist, Filmmaker, and Holocaust Survivor Jack Garfein

20 March 2017 10:22 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

By strange and fortuitous coincidence, my meeting with Jack Garfein fell upon the nexus of several intersecting moments in history. It was Friday, January 27th — International Holocaust Remembrance Day. One week earlier, Donald J. Trump was sworn to office as forty-fifth President of the United States; and in the ensuing weekend, allegations of Trump’s unpunished sexual misconduct, callous attitudes toward women and courting of radical right-wing supporters helped bring about the Women’s March on Washington, one of the largest mass protests in the nation’s history. All around, people are anxiously reading the past with tenuous hopes and fears for the future. History, so often a thing defined after the fact, is currently in violent and furious motion.

Jack Garfein is living history, and he’s not shy about telling it. Born to Ukrainian Jews in 1930, Mr. Garfein personally witnessed as a child the rise of Nazi Germany »

- The Film Stage

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Review: Here Comes the Rain Again—Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “After the Storm”

16 March 2017 12:56 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Many critics accuse directors like Terrence Malick, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, and Asghar Farhadi of making the same movie each time out. The inherent laziness of this argument says more about the writer than the artist, but it also easily disregards stylistic and thematic motifs that are still evolving within a body of work. Japanese master Hirokazu Kore-eda regularly experiences such reductive forms of analysis. Quietly patient and wise, his films are breezy dramatic miniatures that examine the nuances of everyday life. Most impressively, they challenge preconceptions about dramatic redemption, giving conflicted characters the opportunity to grieve, learn, rejoice, and evolve at their own pace. Kore-eda’s After the Storm follows a similarly measured trajectory. It appreciates the present moment even as its lead protagonist continues to dwell on the past. Once a successful novelist, Ryota (Hiroshi Abe) moonlights as a private detective using the job’s free-ranging latitude to »

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The Grapes Of Wrath Screening Thursday March 16th at Webster University

13 March 2017 6:13 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“Sure don’t look none too prosperous.”

The Grapes Of Wrath (1940) screens Thursday March 16th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). The movie starts at 7:30. The screeening is sponsored by Opera Theatre of Saint Louis *(experienceopera.org) who will be staging an opera version of The Grapes Of Wrath May 27th, 31st, June 9th, 15th, 17th, 21st, and 25th. Cliff Froehlich, Executive Director of Cinema St. Louis, will introduce and lead a discussion following the screening. This is a Free event!

John Ford directed so many classics, but The Grapes Of Wrath may be his best. Adapted from John Steinbeck’s 1939 novel, The Grapes Of Wrath tells of the hardships of the Great Depression on Oklahoma sharecroppers who are forced to migrate to Californian for menial work. The film paints a stark picture ofour country’s most bleak period. A time when unemployment was around 25%, dust was choking off normally reliable farmland, »

- Tom Stockman

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Bill Pullman Gives His Best Performance in Years With Western ‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’ — SXSW 2017 Review

13 March 2017 3:11 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Bill Pullman might not be the most obvious choice for a western hero at this stage of his career, but that’s exactly what makes him ideal for “The Ballad of Lefty Brown,” which isn’t about an obvious Western hero. As the titular Lefty, Pullman plays a 63-year-old sidekick in the wilds of late 19th century Montana, where he’s forced to take charge when the traditional hero (Peter Fonda) is suddenly killed. By giving the spotlight to an archetype usually relegated to the background, writer-director Jared Moshé puts a revisionist spin on the familiar oater, but everything else about “The Ballad of Lefty Brown” is by the book.

Moshé’s sophomore effort further illustrates his obsession and deep familiarity with the classic Western mold. His debut, 2012’s “Dead Man’s Burden,” was a taut, minimalist tale of a family battling to save its land from a greedy mining »

- Eric Kohn

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Feud Recap: The Best of Frenemies

12 March 2017 8:04 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

In Sunday’s Feud: Bette and Joan, Davis and Crawford did the unthinkable and called a truce. The end.

No, obviously, that wasn’t the end. In fact, the cease-fire only lasted about as long as it took either actress to finish off a vodka rocks. What brought the curtain down on the Baby Jane co-stars’ detente? Read on…

RelatedFeud Season 2 to Focus on Charles and Diana’s Royal Estrangement

‘Pack The Bags Of The Girl Next Door’ | As “The Other Woman” began, Joan noticed that the ingenue who’d been cast as the Hudson sisters’ neighbor was turning heads on the set. »

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Author Mark Harris on Turning ‘Five Came Back’ Into a Netflix Documentary

12 March 2017 5:45 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Journalist and author Mark Harris’ “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War,” a 500-page examination of five filmmakers — Frank Capra, John Ford, John Huston, George Stevens and William Wyler — and their documentary exploits during World War II, was born out of a personal connection and a professional curiosity.

“My father had been a World War II veteran — he died when I was young,” Harris recalls. “As I got older, I realized I had ignored his war stories. And I came to realize World War II and World War II movies were my weak spot, my big gap in American history.”

His first instincts were as a film historian, peeling back the layers of five men changed by global conflict, who created vital work on the front lines and then came back to America to produce the deepest, most profound work of their careers. But »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Author Mark Harris on Turning ‘Five Came Back’ Into a Netflix Documentary

12 March 2017 5:45 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Journalist and author Mark Harris’ “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War,” a 500-page examination of five filmmakers — Frank Capra, John Ford, John Huston, George Stevens and William Wyler — and their documentary exploits during World War II, was born out of a personal connection and a professional curiosity.

“My father had been a World War II veteran — he died when I was young,” Harris recalls. “As I got older, I realized I had ignored his war stories. And I came to realize World War II and World War II movies were my weak spot, my big gap in American history.”

His first instincts were as a film historian, peeling back the layers of five men changed by global conflict, who created vital work on the front lines and then came back to America to produce the deepest, most profound work of their careers. But he also couldn’t help but see »

- Kristopher Tapley

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SXSW Film Review: ‘The Ballad of Lefty Brown’

12 March 2017 3:11 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Imagine a Western in which Walter Brennan goes gunning for the varmints who bushwhacked John Wayne. That’s pretty much the logline for “The Ballad of Lefty Brown,” writer-director Jared Moshé’s solidly entertaining period drama, which can be enjoyed as both a straight-shooting homage to crotchety sidekicks and shoot-’em-up conventions, and a well-crafted movie about loyalty, betrayal, and redemption that dutifully acknowledges, without slavishly mimicking, the classic oaters that introduced those sidekicks, and established those conventions. Even as Moshé respectfully tips his Stetson to a variety of cinematic forebearers — masterworks by John Ford and Howard Hawks, revisionist ’70s horse operas, Clint Eastwood’s down-and-dirty “Unforgiven” — he rides clear of wink-wink pastiche, and sets his sights on making something that can stand on its own merits as a worthy addition to the genre.

Bill Pullman gets in touch with his inner Gabby Hayes — a rather more serious Gabby Hayes, »

- Joe Leydon

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The Wind that Shakes the Barley: Scott Barley’s "Sleep Has Her House"

9 March 2017 6:59 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Like the great Jean-Marie StraubScott Barley creates striking images by returning us to the basics of cinema, the natural world, but abstracting it through profilmic means by reducing the landscape to pure, basic forms. The sky at night becomes a grid of uneven white points like a pin board; an abstract, grainy image of trees, green hued, are obscured into strikes of painterly lines; the sunset, seen through clouds, is stained with a natural purple tint that makes the image look as unreal as the skies in John Ford’s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon; a deep-focus landscape shot slowly becomes obscured by a patch of fog in the foreground. After a few beats, Barley tends to then situate these abstractions within a clearer sense of space and time. Barley, an installation artist and filmmaker from Newport, South Wales, has gained ecstatic admiration for his short films within certain cinephiliac circles, »

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John Ostrander: Twenty Years Gone

5 March 2017 5:00 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

It was a lifetime ago. It was just moments gone by.

Tuesday will mark twenty years since my wife, Kimberly Ann Yale, died.

I’ve been working on a column discussing the passage for some days but haven’t been satisfied with it. Sometimes you try to say something and can’t find the right things to say. I’ve come across an old column I wrote ten years ago. Just about everything I wanted to say I said back then so, if y’all don’t mind, I’ll just reprint it here.

Today is Thanksgiving and a hearty Happy Thanksgiving to you all. As it turns out, it’s also the birthday of my late wife, Kimberly Ann Yale, who would have been 54 today. This is a day for stopping and giving thanks for the good things in your life and so I’ll ask your indulgence while »

- John Ostrander

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The Forgotten: Erik Charell's "The Congress Dances" (1931) and "Caravan" (1934)

3 March 2017 3:05 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Erik Charell. His credits include script contributions to the Hope-Crosby comedy Road to Morocco and the Tony Martin musical Casbah. To learn this after seeing his only two features as director, The Congress Dances (1931) and Caravan (1934), is like discovering there was a guy called Orson Welles who made Citizen Kane and The Magnificent Ambersons and spent the rest of his career writing gags for Abbott & Costello.Perhaps Charell wasn't an artist of quite Welles' status. But he'd made a big name for himself in operetta, and both his films are in this mode, though the operetta-film is the genre that time forgot. As out-of-vogue as musicals are, despite anything Damien Chazelle can prove to the contrary, they are the height of fashion compared to actual filmed operettas.The Congress Dances is set in Vienna as pre-wwi world leaders meet and get distracted by romance, except Conrad Veidt as master diplomat »

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Logan – Review

2 March 2017 9:50 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

One of the reasons why many fall in love with comic books is because they have a history of focusing on people treated like outsiders. They tell stories about individuals who feel different – men and women simply trying to live a normal life while dealing with an intolerant world. With many of the superhero film adaptations, the approach to telling these stories has been wrong. You usually watch a superhero character that also has human characteristics… not the other way around. The focus is on the “super” difference, not on the idea that humanity is actually comprised of individuals with differences (some big, some small). It’s interesting how most superhero film adaptations get this confused.

Logan successfully corrects this by weaving humanity through the title character’s adamantium body. Wolverine has the unique power to miraculously heal himself within seconds. But now as an old man, Wolverine is less »

- Michael Haffner

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Five Came Back: Netflix Docuseries to Look at Hollywood & World War II

2 March 2017 7:20 PM, PST | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

"If it weren't so evil, it was a comedy." Recently, Netflix announced their new series Five Came Back will debut later this month.Narrated by Meryl Streep, the docuseries "tells the extraordinary story of how Hollywood changed World War II - and how World War II changed Hollywood, through the interwoven experiences of five filmmakers who interrupted their successful careers to serve their country, risk their lives and bring the truth back to the American people: John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens."Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation Unveils African Film Heritage Project

2 March 2017 11:09 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation has unveiled the African Film Heritage Project to locate, restore, and preserve African films in a partnership with the Pan African Federation of Filmmakers and Unesco.

Scorsese announced the initiative Thursday, noting that it follows the foundation’s World Cinema project.

“There are so many films in need of restoration from all over the world,” he said. “We created the World Cinema Project to ensure that the most vulnerable titles don’t disappear forever. Over the past 10 years the Wcp has helped to restore films from Egypt, India, Cuba, the Philippines, Brazil, Armenia, Turkey, Senegal, and many other countries.

“Along the way, we’ve come to understand the urgent need to locate and preserve African films title by title in order to ensure that new generations of filmgoers — African filmgoers in particular — can actually see these works and appreciate them. Fepaci is dedicated to the cause of African Cinema, »

- Dave McNary

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Where do “Moonlight” and the other Oscar winners rank all time?

1 March 2017 12:57 PM, PST | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

With the dust settling from an Academy Awards unlike any other, we can turn our attention a bit to the results, as opposed to how the results were delivered/handled. This is something that’s probably best to take more time to think about, but I’m always fascinated by instant rankings. As such, I wanted not just to do the piece I always do on where the newest Best Picture winner stacks up all time, but also how the other main Oscar winners do. There will be expanded articles in the next month or so going over them in more detail, but for now, this is just a quick glance at where the new class ranks, all time. Before I get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, »

- Joey Magidson

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Netflix doc. Five Came Back, featuring Spielberg, Greengrass, Coppola gets a trailer

1 March 2017 12:31 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

A new Netflix documentary Five Came Back hits the streaming service at the end of the month, and we have the very first trailer to share. The three-part series is adapted from Mark Harris’ best-selling book, “Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War,” and is directed by Laurent Bouzereau.

Five Came Back tells the extraordinary story of how Hollywood changed World War II – and how World War II changed Hollywood, through the interwoven experiences of five filmmakers who interrupted their successful careers to serve their country, risk their lives and bring the truth back to the American people: John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens. To guide viewers through the different personalities, interweaving chronologies and globe-trotting locales, the Five Came Back team turned to the voices of five modern cinematic masters: Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Guillermo Del Toro, Paul Greengrass and Lawrence Kasdan. »

- Paul Heath

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Trailer for Spielberg's Docu-Series 'Five Came Back' About WWII Films

28 February 2017 5:14 PM, PST | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"Western civilization was at stake, and we're going to fight until we win." Netflix has unveiled a trailer for a new three-part documentary series titled Five Came Back. I'm breaking our rules to share this trailer, because it's a docu-series about filmmaking (and filmmakers) and specifically about WWII movies, which is one of my favorite genres. Five Came Back is executive produced by Steven Spielberg (also interviewed in the doc), Scott Rudin and Barry Diller, featuring narration by Meryl Streep. The title refers to "five" filmmakers who helped change the way the American people saw and understood World War II. Those five filmmakers were: John Ford, George Stevens, John Huston, William Wyler, and Frank Capra. The footage in this looks amazing, and I'm super excited to watch this series when it airs in March. Check this out below. Here's the first trailer for Steven Spielberg's docu-series Five Came Back, »

- Alex Billington

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Watch Spielberg, Coppola Laud WWII Filmmakers in New Netflix Docu-Series

28 February 2017 4:15 PM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola and Guillermo Del Toro examine the work of five filmmakers who captured the front lines of World War II in the intriguing new trailer for Netflix's new docu-series, Five Came Back.

The series chronicles the wartime work of John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra and George Stevens, whose documentaries helped mobilize war efforts at home and changed the perspectives of many Americans wary of entering the war in the first place. The film also examines how covering WWII affected each filmmaker personally and professionally, »

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Netflix’s Five Came Back documentary gets trailer and release date

28 February 2017 11:28 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Netflix has made available the trailer for Five Came Back, a documentary about American directors John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens who served their country during World War II and brought the truth of the war back to the people through their films and documentaries. The documentary series is executive produced by Steven Spielberg, Scott Rudin and Barry Diller and directed by Laurent Bouzeraeu. Watch the trailer below.

Shepherding the series to follow the careers of these directors throughout the documentary several modern directors: Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Guillermo del Toro, Paul Greengrass and Lawrence Kasdan. Together with narrator Meryl Streep, they’ll follow the careers of these filmmakers and how they helped change Hollywood through their work and military service.

“These filmmakers, at that time, had a responsibility in that what they were putting into the world would be taken as truth,” said Bouzeraeu. »

- Ricky Church

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002

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