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1-20 of 179 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Grace and Frankie: Season Four Filming Underway for Netflix Series

24 March 2017 6:13 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Season three of Grace and Frankie just debuted today, March 24th, and it seems a fourth season is already underway. Recently, co-creator Marta Kauffman spoke with Deadline about the Netflix series.The comedy stars Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda as unlikely friends who come together after their husbands announce they’re gay and in love. The cast also includes Martin Sheen, Sam Waterston, Brooklyn Decker, and June Diane Raphael.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Gwyneth Paltrow's Very Nsfw Goop Sex Issue Is All About $1500 Sex Toys and Butts

24 March 2017 12:10 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Gwyneth Paltrow's second annual Goop sex issue is here, and as expected, it's all sorts of over-the-top amazing.

The 44-year-old actress' lifestyle brand focuses on anal sex this time around, and features a brand new line of expensive "goop-approved" pleasuring products in the "Get-It-On" shop.

Watch: Gwyneth Paltrow Recommends $15K Gold Sex Toy in Goop's First-Ever Sex Issue

According to the site's sex guide, which includes a Q&A segment with research psychoanalyst and author Paul Joannides, Psy. D., "If anal turns you on, you are definitely not alone."

"In the 80s, I remember hearing from a friend that he had a videotape of anal porn. This seemed shocking at the time," Joannides explained. "I'm not sure there are too many middle schoolers today who would be shocked or even surprised to watch anal sex on Pornhub or Xhamster. I'd say that by 2005, porn had totally blurred the distinction between a woman's anus and vagina."

Joannides »

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‘Grace and Frankie’ Season 3 Review: Lily Tomlin Invents Geriatric Vibrators and the Series Has Never Been Better

24 March 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

By now, you know if “Grace and Frankie” is for you.

After two seasons of curiously addictive TV, it’s clear the talents of Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda are as undeniable as the show’s comedic and dramatic rhythms are challenging. You may love the cast, but find the storytelling uneven. You may want more comedy, more drama, or just more episodes — like the stars. But “Grace and Frankie” is exactly what it wants to be, whether you love it or remain oddly drawn to it, and Season 3 is all about being proud of that identity.

And to this critic, it should be.

The main thrust of Season 3’s first six episodes is unabashed openness: Grace and Frankie have started their own business, manufacturing vibrators for the elderly, and they’re not going to let social hang-ups about sex or ageist business practices get in their way. Grace’s »

- Ben Travers

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‘Grace and Frankie’ Season 3 Review: Lily Tomlin Invents Geriatric Vibrators and the Series Has Never Been Better

24 March 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

By now, you know if “Grace and Frankie” is for you.

After two seasons of curiously addictive TV, it’s clear the talents of Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda are as undeniable as the show’s comedic and dramatic rhythms are challenging. You may love the cast, but find the storytelling uneven. You may want more comedy, more drama, or just more episodes — like the stars. But “Grace and Frankie” is exactly what it wants to be, whether you love it or remain oddly drawn to it, and Season 3 is all about being proud of that identity.

And to this critic, it should be.

The main thrust of Season 3’s first six episodes is unabashed openness: Grace and Frankie have started their own business, manufacturing vibrators for the elderly, and they’re not going to let social hang-ups about sex or ageist business practices get in their way. Grace’s »

- Ben Travers

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'Grace and Frankie' Stars Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin Talk Sex on 'Today,' Totally Embarrass Savannah Guthrie

24 March 2017 10:20 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Jane Fonda definitely knows how to make others blush!

The Grace and Frankie star was a guest on Today Friday, where she and her co-star, Lily Tomlin, had no problem explaining the sex toy empire their characters start up in the all-new third season of their hit series, steaming now on Netflix. While the two were pros at keeping a straight face while chatting about vibrators, Savannah Guthrie couldn't keep her cool, turning beet red in the face.

Watch: Lily Tomlin Says She's 'Trying' to Get Dolly Parton on 'Grace and Frankie'

"Now normally, this would be the section of the interview where I say, 'What is the premise of season three? What is this new business venture?'" Guthrie explained. "But I can't think of a PG way to describe what you're selling. It's a morning show! Kids are eating their cereal right now."

Despite the warning, that didn't »

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Jane Fonda Not Worried About Keeping It PG When Talking ‘Grace And Frankie’

24 March 2017 10:08 AM, PDT | ET Canada | See recent ET Canada news »

As always “Grace and Frankie” co-stars Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin keep us cracking up and their appearance on the “Today Show” Friday was no different. While on the morning show to promote the new season of their hit Netflix series, which is now streaming, “Today Show” hosts Savannah Guthrie and Carson Daly struggled to […] »

- Aynslee Darmon

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Jane Fonda Regales a Red-Faced Savannah Guthrie with Stories About Sex Toys on Grace and Frankie

24 March 2017 7:35 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Savannah Guthrie tried her best to keep the conversation about Grace and Frankie‘s new season PG, but the show’s outspoken star Jane Fonda wasn’t having it.

On Friday’s Today, Fonda and Lily Tomlin swung by to promote season 3 of their acclaimed Netflix show about two former rivals who forge a friendship after their husbands leave them for each other.

But when the topic of the two character’s new sex toy business came up, Guthrie got gun-shy.

“Normally this would be the section of the interview where I would say what is the premise of season 3 — what are you selling? »

- Dave Quinn

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Hot at Any Age: Surprisingly Easy Ways Celebs Stay Fit

24 March 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

It's no secret: Hollywood has an obsession with youth. Health, however, knows no number. Whether you're in your 20s like Vanessa Hudgens or in your 70s like Jane Fonda, healthy living is in your grasp. Ok, the veteran actress may not be boxing it out in the ring, but celebs at any age can stay fit with the right workout and lifestyle techniques. Which one is right for you? You may be surprised that your needs may be the same as a celeb not in your age group. Vanessa HudgensThe 28-year-old actress has tried all of Hollywood's most popular fitness classes—paparazzi photos show her heading to and from SoulCycle and Pilates on the regular. How does the Powerless star keep up with such an intense »

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Grace And Frankie Season 3 Review

23 March 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Six episodes were provided for review prior to release.

The third season of Netflix’s Grace and Frankie opens with Frankie (Lily Tomlin) dancing down the beach pursued by dozens of animated vibrators – an indelible image that sets the tone for the rest of the series. From there, things picks up right where season 2 ended: with Grace (Jane Fonda) and Frankie embarking on their plan to make a line of sex toys for older women, as the pair attempts to secure funding for and develop their project amid family squabbles, personal conflicts and their own complicated relationship.

Society’s insistence on the irrelevancy of older women is a major theme that runs through Grace and Frankie, coming to a head here in the third season. Having raised their children – and lost their husbands – the two main characters are meant to fall into comfortable obscurity, with nothing further to contribute to the running of the world. »

- Lauren Humphries-Brooks

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Meet the Real Artist Behind Lily Tomlin’s Paintings on ‘Grace and Frankie’

23 March 2017 5:17 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Grace and Frankie” stars Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, but there is another star of the series whose face has never been seen onscreen. That person is Nancy Rosen, the real-life artist who provides all of the paintings on the series for Tomlin’s character, who is a painter and art teacher.

The Chicago-based Rosen has provided paintings for every season of the Netflix series, but her love of art goes back to her childhood. “I’ve been painting since I was five,” Rosen told Variety. “I didn’t have any choice about that. That’s just what it’s always been. It’s always made up my entire life. It’s kind of what wakes me up in the morning and I do every day.”

Rosen is an old friend of Robbie Tollin, an executive producer on the series. “Her and her family have been collecting my work since I was a little girl,” she »

- Joe Otterson

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‘Grace And Frankie’: Marta Kauffman On Season 3, Dolly Parton & Why It’s Great To Be A Woman

23 March 2017 3:00 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

"The show isn't about politics, and I don't want it to be topical," says Grace and Frankie co-creator Marta Kauffman about her Jane Fonda- and Lily Tomlin-starring series that launches its third season March 24 on Netflix. "Once you make it topical it gets very, very difficult to have it continue to air at all times and not feel dated," the Friends executive producer adds. "I'm in the business of entertaining people.” With the success of Friends during its nearly… »

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Jane Fonda Gets Candid About Using Sex Toys at Age 79: ‘Use It or Lose It, Right?’

20 March 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Jane Fonda‘s Grace and Frankie character is starting a new business selling something the actress says she’s personally very familiar with.

Fonda, 79, stopped by The Ellen DeGeneres Show for an episode airing Monday, in which she revealed that in the new season of her show, her character starts a business selling vibrators to older adults.

“The directions have large print,” she joked as she pulled out one of the toys.

“I cannot show that. I cannot show that,” DeGeneres said as Fonda tried to whip out the sex toy.

The actress said she did some research into vibrators »

- Jodi Guglielmi

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Jane Fonda Says She Was ‘Always In Love’ With Robert Redford On Movie Sets: ‘I Fall Into His Eyes’

20 March 2017 7:04 AM, PDT | ET Canada | See recent ET Canada news »

Jane Fonda stars in her fifth movie with Robert Redford, and admits that after all these years, he still makes her swoon. “The only problem with working with Bob is I kind of look into his eyes and I kind of fall into his eyes and forget my dialogue,” Fonda said of the 80-year-old actor […] »

- Aynslee Darmon

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Jane Fonda Says She Was 'Always in Love' With Robert Redford On Movie Sets: 'I Fall Into His Eyes'

20 March 2017 5:22 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Jane Fonda stars in her fifth movie with Robert Redford, and admits that after all these years, he still makes her swoon.

"The only problem with working with Bob is I kind of look into his eyes and I kind of fall into his eyes and forget my dialogue," Fonda said of the 80-year-old actor on Monday's episode of The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

The 79-year-old actress stars with Redford in Our Souls at Night, but has also been his love interest in The Chase (1966), Barefoot in the Park (1967) and The Electric Horseman (1979). The two also appeared in Tall Story in 1966, with Redford having an unaccredited role. »

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What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999

17 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mississippi Masala

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

While female filmmakers waited for Judge Pamela Rymer to hand down a decision in the 1983 Directors Guild class-action suit against Warner Brothers and Columbia Pictures, alleging discrimination for not hiring women and ethnic minorities represented by the guild, there were positive signs of change in Hollywood.

In 1984, for the first time that almost anyone could remember, one needed two hands to count the number of feature films by women released in the U.S. market. One was Diane Kurys’ “Entre Nous” (1983), nominated for best foreign film at the Academy Awards in April 1984, making Kurys the second female director whose film was so honored.

Between 1950 and 1980, the number of movies directed by women in the Directors Guild of America (DGA) totaled 14. From 1984 to 1985 there were 12.

In 1984 many women were making their second features. Among them were Gillian Armstrong’s period drama “Mrs. Soffel,” Amy Heckerling’s gangster comedy “Johnny Dangerously,” Penelope Spheeris’ teenage-runaway saga “Suburbia,” and Amy Holden Jones’ romantic drama “Love Letters.” Martha Coolidge, beloved for “Valley Girl,” her 1983 debut, was on her third feature, “National Lampoon’s Joy of Sex.” With more women behind the movie camera in the United States than any time since the ’teens, it seemed that Hollywood was reopening the studio gates to women. Their movies featured women in lead roles.

The wave of optimism crested in 1985. Argentine director Maria Luisa Bemberg’s historical romance “Camila” (1984) was in contention for best foreign film. Susan Seidelman, an Nyu film-school grad who made a splash in 1983 with the indie “Smithereens,” released “Desperately Seeking Susan,” starring “It Girl” Rosanna Arquette and Madonna, cast when the latter was a relative unknown. It was a runaway hit. Heckerling and Spheeris each released third features, respectively “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” and “The Boys Next Door.” Coolidge released her fourth: “Real Genius,” a genuinely funny nerd comedy with a fully developed female character — and special effects.

Then came the crash.

In August 1985 Judge Rymer handed down her decision. While the class-action case was important and viable, Rymer ruled, she had to disqualify the DGA from leading the class due to a conflict of interest. White male members also competing for directing jobs dominated the guild, she said. Thus the DGA was in no position to represent the interests of its women and ethnic minority members. Out of exhaustion and lack of money, the Original Six, the group of female filmmakers that had first spurred the DGA to initiate the suit, did not pursue it any further.

As the DGA suit played out during the early 1980s, Hollywood’s business model was in flux. Studios abandoned the one-size-fits-all strategy of advertising a movie in general-interest publications and embraced segmented marketing — that is, making and marketing movies to a specific demographic. Fewer dollars were spent advertising movies in mainstream newspapers and more were spent on ads that ran during TV shows young males were said to watch. More and more, movies starred predominantly men and boys. Because actors had higher-profile roles, they could command higher salaries than actresses.

By dividing the market into sectors, studios divided the audience and the culture. Boys see movies about boys. Older people see movies about older people. Women see movies about women. Those in different demographics no longer watch the same stories.

In 1980, four of the 10 top box office stars were women: Sally Field, Jane Fonda, Sissy Spacek, and Barbra Streisand. In 1990 there was only one: Julia Roberts. According to 1990 statistics from the Screen Actors Guild, not only were actresses underpaid, but they were also “undercast”: 14 percent of the leading roles, and only 29 percent of all roles, went to women.

The “Indiana Jones” trilogy made in the 1980s reflected the progressively diminishing role of females in film during a decade when male action/adventures dominated the multiplex. In “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981), the character Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen) plays Indy’s helpmate. In “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984), the Willie Scott character (Kate Capshaw) is helpless. And in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” archeologist Elsa Schneider (Alison Doody) is the enemy.

Despite such trends, the late 1980s and 1990s proved to be boom years for female directors in Hollywood and Indiewood, as independent film is known. In 1987, Kathryn Bigelow, a onetime sculptor and graduate of Columbia University’s film program, made her second feature, the “vampire Western” “Near Dark.” And though Elaine May’s studio film “Ishtar” was almost universally panned upon release, it earned belated respect. Richard Brody of The New Yorker correctly described it as “an unjustly derided masterwork.” In 1987, six percent of films were directed by women, higher than at any time since 1916.

The percentage dropped in 1988, but that was a watershed year for female filmmakers. “Big,” a comedy from Penny Marshall (co-written by Anne Spielberg), was universally acclaimed. It was the first movie directed by a woman that surpassed $100 million at the box office. With the romantic comedy “Crossing Delancey,” Joan Micklin Silver returned to making big-screen fare, and her modest hit was well received. Also in 1988, Silver’s daughter, Marisa, made her second feature, “Permanent Record,” about teen suicide. “Salaam, Bombay!”, the first feature from Mira Nair, the India-born, Harvard-educated documentarian, was a best foreign film Oscar nominee.

The following year, “Look Who’s Talking” from Amy Heckerling likewise surpassed the $100 million mark for box office sales in the U.S. and made nearly $300 million worldwide. For the most part, though, heads of studios regarded Marshall’s and Heckerling’s box-office smashes as flukes. Two heads of production told me in 1991 that “movies by women don’t make money.” Nevertheless, it turned out to be a exceptional year for the quality and range of releases from women. And it shaped up to be a year when movies by female filmmakers did make serious money.

Some of the highlights of 1991: Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust,” an evocative portrait of generations of Gullah women off the South Carolina coast circa 1901; Jodie Foster’s “Little Man Tate,” about a child prodigy emotionally torn between his mother and a psychologist for gifted children; and Mira Nair’s “Mississippi Masala,” a sexy romance about a South Asian woman born in Uganda (played by then-newcomer Sarita Choudhry) in love with an African-American man (Denzel Washington). Both Kathryn Bigelow’s action film “Point Break” and Barbra Streisand’s psychological study “Prince of Tides” examined the emotional costs to men who struggle to prove their masculinity. Bigelow’s movie grossed $83 million and Streisand’s $110 million. (Adjusted for inflation, that’s $148 million and $196 million in today’s dollars.)

Not only can female filmmakers make movies that show a different side of men, but they also make movies that show different aspects of women. Penny Marshall’s “A League of Their Own” (1992), about the All-American Girls Baseball Leagues during World War II, celebrates the athleticism (rather than the sexuality) of the female body. Nora Ephron’s “This is My Life,” her 1992 directorial debut about a single mom whose choice of comedy career affects her daughters, shows that career and motherhood need not be in conflict. Like Ephron’s film, Allison Anders’ “Gas Food Lodging” (also 1992) explores what happens when the children of single moms reconnect with biological fathers. Male directors were, and are not, making movies like these.

During the 1990s, almost every year brought a new evergreen made by a female filmmaker. In 1993 there were two. One was Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” a haunting allegory about a mute woman that struck a chord internationally. It earned $62 million at the box office and multiple Oscar nominations, including one for best director, making Campion the third woman to be cited in this category. The other was Nora Ephron’s “Sleepless in Seattle,” the comedic romance between two people who don’t meet in person until the last scene, which scored a $227 million box office.

“Sleepless” additionally introduced the questionable concept of the “chick flick” to a broader audience. This is a non-genre that has come to be defined as any movie that, according to the term’s proponents, women want to see and that men think they don’t want to watch — or any movie directed by a woman. The division between “chick flick” and its corollary, the “dick flick,” is a perhaps unintended consequence of target marketing, implying that movies represent a gender-linked proposition.

Almost overnight, the perception was created that movies predominantly featuring women, or “women’s interests,” or directed by women would shrivel the manhood of the male moviegoer. In 1994 the head of a major studio told me, without irony or shame, that “Women on the screen means no men in the audience.” When I asked him for data to back up his claim, he said he had it, but it was proprietary.

Despite such signs of cultural and corporate sexism, the 1990s were a good time to be a female filmmaker. In 1994, Gillian Armstrong’s “Little Women” was immediately embraced as a classic. Newcomer Darnell Martin’s “I Like it Like That,” an urban comedy about a working mother juggling job, marriage, and parenthood, earned positive reviews. And Rose Troche’s “Go Fish,” the first indie comedy about girl-on-girl courtship, marked a milestone for the burgeoning genre.

The following year, 16 films by women were in U.S. release, setting another record for that era. Many of them were comedies. There was Amy Heckerling’s “Clueless,” a droll version of Jane Austen’s “Emma” set at a Beverly Hills high school. There is Betty Thomas’ “The Brady Bunch Movie,” in which the former actress sets the characters of the 1970s TV hit in the 1990s to great comic effect. Distinctly not a comedy was Kathryn Bigelow’s “Strange Days,” a science-fiction thriller about sex crimes, which lost money but became a cult favorite. At the 1996 Oscar ceremony, with “Antonia’s Line,” Dutch filmmaker Marleen Gorris became the first female filmmaker to direct the award-winning foreign film.

But apart from Bigelow and Mimi Leder, a director of episodic television who in 1997 directed “The Peacemaker” and in 1998 “Deep Impact,” female filmmakers were not making action films. For the most part women made comedies and human stories, movies with no explosions in the opening scene. Veteran filmmaker Martha Coolidge spoke for many women when she noted that the scripts the studios sent her were for comedies or family dramas. “About 90 percent of what comes my way are ten different kinds of breast cancer stories, ten kinds of divorce stories, and ten kinds of women-taking-care-of-their-fathers stories,” she said. “I do those. I care about those deeply. But one does want to do more.”

Female filmmakers were typecast in the way many actors and actresses have been, for the most part pigeonholed in family drama and comedy genres. For example, in 1997 actress Kasi Lemmons made her directorial debut with “Eve’s Bayou,” a haunting family drama, and Betty Thomas returned with the Howard Stern biopic “Private Parts.” In 1998, Ephron returned with the romantic comedy “You’ve Got Mail.” Nancy Meyers, a long-time screenwriter, made her directorial debut with the family-friendly comedy “The Parent Trap,” and Brenda Chapman, a Disney animator, was one of three directors on “Prince of Egypt,” the animated story of Moses.

In 1999, three female filmmakers made rookie features unlike anything in American movies. Two were romantic dramas about teenage sexuality, the other an imaginative Shakespeare adaptation. Sofia Coppola’s “The Virgin Suicides,” based on the novel by Jeffrey Eugenides, looked at how boys look at girls, subversively turning the female gaze on the male gaze. Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” dramatized the life story of Teena Brandon, who changed her name and gender to become Brandon Teena and fell victim to a hate crime.

Julie Taymor, the theater director who created “The Lion King” on stage, made her movie debut with “Titus,” an anachronistic version of the Shakespeare history play “Titus Andronicus,” underscoring its parallels to Italy under Mussolini.

At the end of the decade — and century — of the 11,000 filmmakers working both in television and film included in the Directors Guild of America, about 2,300 were women. While women made up 21 percent of the membership, they comprised only 9 percent of the filmmakers working in movies.

Most, including Martha Lauzen, a professor at San Diego State University and the head of the Center for the Study of Women in Film and Television, naturally assumed that in the new century the needle would move toward 50/50.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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Newswire: Now you can proudly wear Jane Fonda’s mug shot

17 March 2017 | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

After starting off as an ingenue in the 1960s, by 1970 Jane Fonda had won her first Oscar nomination (for They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?) and was immersed in the protest movement against the Vietnam War. As she explains on her website, she toured the country raising funds, giving speeches, and looking for ex-soldiers who could testify that atrocities like the “My Lai massacre was not an isolated incident, but a not-uncommon occurrence that was part and parcel of the U.S.’s war strategy.”

In November 1970, Fonda attempted to reenter the country from Canada after her very first speech, when all of her luggage was seized at the Cleveland airport. (The more things change…) The customs agents declared that some pills she had were suspicious, even though she insisted they were vitamins in “little plastic envelopes marked (in red nail polish) ‘B’, ‘L’, ‘D’–signifying breakfast, lunch ...

»

- Gwen Ihnat

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Jane Fonda Is Selling Merchandise with Her 1970s Mugshot on It – and It’s Going Fast!

16 March 2017 10:24 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Jane Fonda is a Hollywood icon for her acting, activism, unapologetic sense of style and of course, her exercise prowess. And if you didn’t think she could get any cooler, Fonda’s new project will exceed your expectations.

One her website, the actress is selling all types of merchandise — from T-shirts, to tote bags, to coffee mugs and clutches — and each product has one thing in common: Fonda’s 1970 mugshot from her arrest in Cleveland, Ohio, emblazoned on the front. (You can even purchase the pink-sleeved baseball shirt she’s wearing in the photo above for $29.99.)

Related Photos: Jane Fonda »

- Colleen Kratofil

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Review: "The Electric Horseman" (1979) Starring Robert Redford And Jane Fonda; UK DVD Release

15 March 2017 6:06 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Diane A. Rodgers

A wonderfully understated comedy-drama, The Electric Horseman follows the story of Sonny Steele (Robert Redford), a five-time champion rodeo cowboy now turned brand spokesman for AMPco, a giant corporate firm selling 'Ranch' breakfast cereal.  Steele's life has become essentially a series of advertising appearances, at which he is required to brandish a box of cereal with his face adorning it whilst wearing a garish cowboy outfit festooned with electric fairy lights. The forced smiles, autographs and constant touring are starting to crack Steele; when we meet him, he is a disillusioned, unreliable drunk, stumbling from one engagement to the next.

The film centres around a big Las Vegas convention where Steele is booked for a ride-on appearance with AMPco's prize mascot, a 12-million-dollar racehorse. Horse and rider are strapped up in purple paisley silk and electric lights, the ridiculous spectacle of which, in the capital of sensational fakery and money-worship, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Scott Stuber to head Netflix original film initiative

14 March 2017 12:36 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

War Machine, First They Killed My Father, Bright among roster of titles scheduled to launch this year.

One of the biggest open secrets in Hollywood was confirmed on Tuesday as it emerged Scott Stuber, the former vice-chairman of worldwide production at Universal, will head Netflix’s original film initiative.

The appointment is a coup for deep-pocketed streaming service as it attempts to draw big names and big productions into the fold beyond those that are already lined up for release this year (see below).

Stuber had been courted for the top job at Paramount and will now lead the development, production and acquisition of Netflix’s growing slate of original films for a global subscriber base the company said currently numbered more than 93m.

The new hire most recently founded and ran Bluegrass Films, the Universal-based production company behind such hits as Ted, and Central Intelligence. Bluegrass will transition to partner Dylan Clark and continue its TV »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Scott Stuber to head Netflix film division

14 March 2017 12:36 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

War Machine, First They Killed My Father, Bright among roster of titles scheduled to launch this year.

One of the biggest open secrets in Hollywood was confirmed on Tuesday as it emerged Scott Stuber, the former vice-chairman of worldwide production at Universal, will head Netflix’s original film initiative.

The appointment is a coup for deep-pocketed streaming service as it attempts to draw big names and big productions into the fold beyond those that are already lined up for release this year (see below).

Stuber had been courted for the top job at Paramount and will now lead the development, production and acquisition of Netflix’s growing slate of original films for a global subscriber base the company said currently numbered more than 93m.

The new hire most recently founded and ran Bluegrass Films, the Universal-based production company behind such hits as Ted, and Central Intelligence. Bluegrass will transition to partner Dylan Clark and continue its TV »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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