IMDb > Emilio Estevez > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001 | 2000

19 items from 2006


Phoenix critix tap United 93 as Best Pic

21 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Following in the steps of the Dallas assn., the critics from sunny state Arizona also selected United 93 as the best feature. Here is the complete set of winners of the Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards. Winners of the 2006 Phoenix Film Critics Society Awards Best Film: "United 93" directed by Paul GreengrassRunners-up (in alphabetical order): "Babel""Bobby""Borat""Children of Men" "The Departed""The Last King of Scotland" "Letters from Iwo Jima" "Little Miss Sunshine""The Queen"Best Foreign-Language Film: "Letters from Iwo Jima," directed by Clint EastwoodBest Director: Martin Scorsese, "The Departed" Best Actor: Forest Whitaker, "The Last King of Scotland"Best Actress: Helen Mirren, "The Queen"Best Supporting Actor: Jack Nicholson, "The Departed"Best Supporting Actress: Cate Blanchett, "Notes on a Scandal"Best Original Screenplay: Michael Arndt, "Little Miss Sunshine"Best Adapted Screenplay: William Monahan, "The Departed"Best Ensemble Acting: "Little Miss Sunshine"Best Documentary: "An Inconvenient Truth, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Stone Slams Slater Reports

21 December 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood beauty Sharon Stone has slammed reports she is dating her Bobby co-star Christian Slater. The pair recently attended several premieres of the Emilio Estevez-directed movie together, sparking rumors they were romancing. However, Stone's representative tells gossip site The Scoop, "They did Bobby together and went to two of the premieres together. Nothing else." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Estevez Planning Globe Celebration with Father

18 December 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Emilio Estevez was thrilled to hear his movie Bobby was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards - and plans to celebrate the triumph with his actor father Martin Sheen. Sheen is currently studying for a degree in English Literature at the National University Of Ireland in Galway, while his actor/director son lives in Los Angeles. Estevez's movie about the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy is up for Best Motion Picture - Drama and Best Original Song for "Never Gonna Break My Faith." The Breakfast Club star enthuses, "I'm having to pinch myself this morning. I'm really thrilled for my pop, too. The Hollywood Foreign Press has been a wonderful supporter of the film since our spectacular first screening in Venice, Italy." Sheen stars alongside Sharon Stone, Demi Moore, Sir Anthony Hopkins, Helen Hunt and a host of other big names in the movie, which is directed and written by Estevez. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Spirits soar at sunrise

15 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

COMPLETE COVERAGE:

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles

List of nominees

TV nominees react

Risky Business: Anne Thompson's take

Grove: Votes impact Oscar coin

A late night of partying morphed into an early morning of celebration for "Babel" director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. "It's funny", he said. "I was at a party with Penelope Cruz, and it was 5:30 (a.m.) when I arrived at my house. Someone was watching TV, and I asked, 'What's going on here?' It was my wife watching, and I heard my name on the TV, and I heard a shout. And she started jumping all over me. I didn't understand what was going on." The couple had plenty of reasons to revel as the multiarc drama scored the most Globe nominations with seven, including one for the Mexican-born helmer. "That was the one that surprised me the most," said Inarritu, whose "Amores Perros" vied for best foreign film at the 2001 Globes. That year, Inarritu lost to Ang Lee's "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon". As for his chances this year, the director said he doesn't want to jinx himself. "I will never prepare a speech", he said. "That's bad luck. If I'm in those circumstances one day, which I doubt, I will just speak from my heart." Meanwhile, "Babel" producer Steve Golin said he was "pleasantly surprised" at the film's showing yet can understand why the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. is so enamored of the globetrotting film, which shot in locales including Morocco and Japan. "It truly is an international picture," Golin said. "And I think that helped the film a lot with these voters."

*****

Penelope Cruz backed up Gonzalez Inarritu's story, saying she was "very tired" and hadn't slept, though it's hard to conjure up much sympathy for her. After designers Dolce & Gabbana threw a party in her honor late Wednesday night, she decided to stay awake for the nominations, eating pancakes in her Chateau Marmont hotel room with friends including Prince and Gael Garcia Bernal. When her best actress drama nomination for "Volver" came in, "it was beautiful to see my friends' reactions," Cruz said as her dogs Vino and Leon fought in the background. Director Pedro Almodovar was the first person to call from overseas, leaving her a "screaming message." After mixed success with U.S. productions, getting recognized for work in her native language with one of her first directors felt good to Cruz. "I've done 35 or 37 movies, and this one feels like it's all about the work and has nothing to do with your ego," she said. "Pedro's given me the opportunity to do this. He's given me that trust."

*****

Kate Winslet was dropping off her toddler at school when news came of her best actress nom for "Little Children". "It's difficult to contain your excitement when you're standing in a room of 3-year-olds," she said with a laugh. "Even now, I'm jumping up and down. I'm really, really fucking happy!" One might think more than a decade of nominations (starting with "Sense and Sensibility") would have dampened her enthusiasm a bit, but no. "To be nominated alongside two Dames (Helen Mirren and Judi Dench) is incredible. I'm speechless. Usually I'm not as aware of the whole awards thing, but I've been on the press treadmill a lot recently, and it's made it a bit more nerve-wracking, to be quite honest." After "screaming on the telephone" to husband Sam Mendes, who is in New York with Winslet while directing "The Vertical Hour" on Broadway, she called her friend and fellow nominee Maggie Gyllenhaal. "I said this is so significant for small films like ours to get seen," Winslet said.

*****

Leonardo DiCaprio slept soundly in his Los Angeles home and woke up at 8 a.m. when his manager Rick Yorn phoned in the news that he had earned not one but two lead actor noms. Although DiCaprio is a Globes veteran, having already grabbed three best actor nominations (and a win for "The Aviator"), he was still "blown away," he admitted. "It's a great feeling. I'm really proud of both of these movies. I give all the credit to the filmmakers I got to work with. I'm very happy for Marty (Scorsese, director of 'The Departed'). This is hopefully his year." While DiCaprio was "very surprised" to be nominated for both "Departed" and "Blood Diamond", the roles were equally daunting, he said. "Certainly with 'Blood Diamond, ' it was challenging taking on a character so unlike me in every way, from halfway around the world, with military experience, dealing with the black-market diamond industry, an African white man in the post-apartheid era," he said. "Going to Africa for that long, being away from home, was very difficult." "Departed" brought different challenges, mostly because of the actors' schedules. "A lot of the actors had to leave to do other projects," he said. "They were all doing separate movies, so I was going into character for two weeks, then letting go and coming back for a day here and a day there. It was hard to maintain focus on that movie." But DiCaprio did enjoy working with fellow nominee Jack Nicholson: "He elevates everyone. Jack is a force of nature; he definitely has his own unique approach. There has only been one Jack in the rich history of cinema."

*****

There have been ups and downs in Ben Affleck's career, but with his "Hollywoodland" supporting actor nom and a recent Venice Film Festival win, things are on the upswing. "I was really surprised by Venice, and this is also a surprise," Affleck said. The Focus Features/Miramax Films co-production is "sort of dark, not many people saw it, and there are a lot of good performances out there. I'm just happy to be on the train," he said. The first person to congratulate the actor Thursday morning was his baby daughter ("She's up at 4 in the morning", he said wryly), followed by wife Jennifer Garner.

*****

Best comic actor nominee Sacha Baron Cohen modestly began a prepared statement, acknowledging the two noms for "Borat". "I am extremely honored", he said. "I'm very proud as well for my fellow writers as well as our director Larry Charles and our producer Jay Roach and am very thankful for the HFPA's belief and acknowledgment of our film." But then the irrepressible comedian couldn't resist adding: "I have been trying to let Borat know this great news, but for the last four hours both of Kazakhstan's telephones have been engaged. Eventually, Premier Nazarbayev answered and said he would pass on the message as soon as Borat returned from Iran, where he is guest of honor at the Holocaust Denial Conference."

*****

Guillermo Del Toro, who wrote and directed "Pan's Labyrinth", didn't get a lick of sleep in his San Francisco hotel room Wednesday night waiting to hear the Golden Globe nominations. "You're talking to a man in a dream state," he said. "They told me to go to bed, we'd know at 5:15 a.m. It's like telling a kid Santa's showing up, and watching the milk and cookies carefully overnight." Del Toro's fellow Mexico countryman Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, who directed multiple-Globe nominee "Babel", woke up Del Toro's wife at 6 a.m. to report the happy news on both of their films. Both men have been on the long campaign trail since the Festival de Cannes in May, and have worked hard to support each other's films. "Other than Alejandro causing that domestic turbulence, it's the best week I've ever had," said Del Toro. "It's been a particularly crowded year. Having seen a few of (the other foreign films) and knowing they were very good, I did have nail-biting experience." Del Toro has been on a city-by-city promo tour, because, he says, "like any foreign film, the main thing is making sure it gets seen. Frankly, that's the biggest weapon of this movie, to be seen." Del Toro's violent Spanish Civil War fable relays a powerful message: "The fact that we live in a brutal world means that we are in desperate need for spirituality," he said. "The movie proves that within each of us there is a world we can access: it's as real as the world outside, and it can fill you with hope."

*****

"Bobby" producer Holly Wiersma was virtually living in the editing room, finishing up George Hickenlooper's "Factory Girl" for its Dec. 29 Oscar-qualifying run, when she got the call from the Weinstein Co. that her film nabbed a best picture (drama) nomination. "I talked to (director) Emilio Estevez) first, who is so excited and humbled and can't believe it. He's devoted seven years of his life to it -- this whole movie is because of him." Her next call was from a member of the film's large ensemble, Christian Slater. "Christian said this has been the best experience of his life," she said. On her way to meet with proud studio head Harvey Weinstein, however, Wiersma had something more important on her mind. "I have to call my mom -- she's called four times!" she said. "She's going to kill me". Weinstein had his own theory behind "Bobby"'s success: "HFPA members saw it in Venice", where the film was said to be in serious awards consideration, "so they saw it under ideal circumstances," he said.

*****

Best supporting actress nominee Jennifer Hudson woke up at 3 a.m. "Nerves got the best of me", she said. "They tapped me and said, 'Jennifer, wake up now.' " It's been a whirlwind four months promoting "Dreamgirls", she said. "Oh my goodness, it done wore me out." The rookie actress got a lot of help creating the role of Effie, she admitted, especially from her director, Bill Condon, who wasn't nominated. "He gave me that chance and walked me through it all," Hudson said. "He directed me. I don't know if I'd be sitting here right now as a Golden Globe nominee if he hadn't given me that great direction. He's such an amazing director. I'm going to create him an award myself." On the set, Jamie Foxx gave her acting tips, while Beyonce Knowles helped her with the dance moves. "I tried to do whatever I could to make Effie real," Hudson said. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Spirits soar at sunrise

14 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

COMPLETE COVERAGE:

Eastwood, DiCaprio play doubles

List of nominees

TV nominees react

Risky Business: Anne Thompson's take

Grove: Votes impact Oscar coin

A late night of partying morphed into an early morning of celebration for "Babel" director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu. "It's funny", he said. "I was at a party with Penelope Cruz, and it was 5:30 (a.m.) when I arrived at my house. Someone was watching TV, and I asked, 'What's going on here?' It was my wife watching, and I heard my name on the TV, and I heard a shout. And she started jumping all over me. I didn't understand what was going on." The couple had plenty of reasons to revel as the multiarc drama scored the most Globe nominations with seven, including one for the Mexican-born helmer. "That was the one that surprised me the most," said Inarritu, whose "Amores Perros" vied for best foreign film at the 2001 Globes. That year, Inarritu lost to Ang Lee's "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon". As for his chances this year, the director said he doesn't want to jinx himself. "I will never prepare a speech", he said. "That's bad luck. If I'm in those circumstances one day, which I doubt, I will just speak from my heart." Meanwhile, "Babel" producer Steve Golin said he was "pleasantly surprised" at the film's showing yet can understand why the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. is so enamored of the globetrotting film, which shot in locales including Morocco and Japan. "It truly is an international picture," Golin said. "And I think that helped the film a lot with these voters."

*****

Penelope Cruz backed up Gonzalez Inarritu's story, saying she was "very tired" and hadn't slept, though it's hard to conjure up much sympathy for her. After designers Dolce & Gabbana threw a party in her honor late Wednesday night, she decided to stay awake for the nominations, eating pancakes in her Chateau Marmont hotel room with friends including Prince and Gael Garcia Bernal. When her best actress drama nomination for "Volver" came in, "it was beautiful to see my friends' reactions," Cruz said as her dogs Vino and Leon fought in the background. Director Pedro Almodovar was the first person to call from overseas, leaving her a "screaming message." After mixed success with U.S. productions, getting recognized for work in her native language with one of her first directors felt good to Cruz. "I've done 35 or 37 movies, and this one feels like it's all about the work and has nothing to do with your ego," she said. "Pedro's given me the opportunity to do this. He's given me that trust."

*****

Kate Winslet was dropping off her toddler at school when news came of her best actress nom for "Little Children". "It's difficult to contain your excitement when you're standing in a room of 3-year-olds," she said with a laugh. "Even now, I'm jumping up and down. I'm really, really fucking happy!" One might think more than a decade of nominations (starting with "Sense and Sensibility") would have dampened her enthusiasm a bit, but no. "To be nominated alongside two Dames (Helen Mirren and Judi Dench) is incredible. I'm speechless. Usually I'm not as aware of the whole awards thing, but I've been on the press treadmill a lot recently, and it's made it a bit more nerve-wracking, to be quite honest." After "screaming on the telephone" to husband Sam Mendes, who is in New York with Winslet while directing "The Vertical Hour" on Broadway, she called her friend and fellow nominee Maggie Gyllenhaal. "I said this is so significant for small films like ours to get seen," Winslet said.

*****

Leonardo DiCaprio slept soundly in his Los Angeles home and woke up at 8 a.m. when his manager Rick Yorn phoned in the news that he had earned not one but two lead actor noms. Although DiCaprio is a Globes veteran, having already grabbed three best actor nominations (and a win for "The Aviator"), he was still "blown away," he admitted. "It's a great feeling. I'm really proud of both of these movies. I give all the credit to the filmmakers I got to work with. I'm very happy for Marty (Scorsese, director of 'The Departed'). This is hopefully his year." While DiCaprio was "very surprised" to be nominated for both "Departed" and "Blood Diamond", the roles were equally daunting, he said. "Certainly with 'Blood Diamond, ' it was challenging taking on a character so unlike me in every way, from halfway around the world, with military experience, dealing with the black-market diamond industry, an African white man in the post-apartheid era," he said. "Going to Africa for that long, being away from home, was very difficult." "Departed" brought different challenges, mostly because of the actors' schedules. "A lot of the actors had to leave to do other projects," he said. "They were all doing separate movies, so I was going into character for two weeks, then letting go and coming back for a day here and a day there. It was hard to maintain focus on that movie." But DiCaprio did enjoy working with fellow nominee Jack Nicholson: "He elevates everyone. Jack is a force of nature; he definitely has his own unique approach. There has only been one Jack in the rich history of cinema."

*****

There have been ups and downs in Ben Affleck's career, but with his "Hollywoodland" supporting actor nom and a recent Venice Film Festival win, things are on the upswing. "I was really surprised by Venice, and this is also a surprise," Affleck said. The Focus Features/Miramax Films co-production is "sort of dark, not many people saw it, and there are a lot of good performances out there. I'm just happy to be on the train," he said. The first person to congratulate the actor Thursday morning was his baby daughter ("She's up at 4 in the morning", he said wryly), followed by wife Jennifer Garner.

*****

Best comic actor nominee Sacha Baron Cohen modestly began a prepared statement, acknowledging the two noms for "Borat". "I am extremely honored", he said. "I'm very proud as well for my fellow writers as well as our director Larry Charles and our producer Jay Roach and am very thankful for the HFPA's belief and acknowledgment of our film." But then the irrepressible comedian couldn't resist adding: "I have been trying to let Borat know this great news, but for the last four hours both of Kazakhstan's telephones have been engaged. Eventually, Premier Nazarbayev answered and said he would pass on the message as soon as Borat returned from Iran, where he is guest of honor at the Holocaust Denial Conference."

*****

Guillermo Del Toro, who wrote and directed "Pan's Labyrinth", didn't get a lick of sleep in his San Francisco hotel room Wednesday night waiting to hear the Golden Globe nominations. "You're talking to a man in a dream state," he said. "They told me to go to bed, we'd know at 5:15 a.m. It's like telling a kid Santa's showing up, and watching the milk and cookies carefully overnight." Del Toro's fellow Mexico countryman Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, who directed multiple-Globe nominee "Babel", woke up Del Toro's wife at 6 a.m. to report the happy news on both of their films. Both men have been on the long campaign trail since the Festival de Cannes in May, and have worked hard to support each other's films. "Other than Alejandro causing that domestic turbulence, it's the best week I've ever had," said Del Toro. "It's been a particularly crowded year. Having seen a few of (the other foreign films) and knowing they were very good, I did have nail-biting experience." Del Toro has been on a city-by-city promo tour, because, he says, "like any foreign film, the main thing is making sure it gets seen. Frankly, that's the biggest weapon of this movie, to be seen." Del Toro's violent Spanish Civil War fable relays a powerful message: "The fact that we live in a brutal world means that we are in desperate need for spirituality," he said. "The movie proves that within each of us there is a world we can access: it's as real as the world outside, and it can fill you with hope."

*****

"Bobby" producer Holly Wiersma was virtually living in the editing room, finishing up George Hickenlooper's "Factory Girl" for its Dec. 29 Oscar-qualifying run, when she got the call from the Weinstein Co. that her film nabbed a best picture (drama) nomination. "I talked to (director) Emilio Estevez) first, who is so excited and humbled and can't believe it. He's devoted seven years of his life to it -- this whole movie is because of him." Her next call was from a member of the film's large ensemble, Christian Slater. "Christian said this has been the best experience of his life," she said. On her way to meet with proud studio head Harvey Weinstein, however, Wiersma had something more important on her mind. "I have to call my mom -- she's called four times!" she said. "She's going to kill me". Weinstein had his own theory behind "Bobby"'s success: "HFPA members saw it in Venice", where the film was said to be in serious awards consideration, "so they saw it under ideal circumstances," he said.

*****

Best supporting actress nominee Jennifer Hudson woke up at 3 a.m. "Nerves got the best of me", she said. "They tapped me and said, 'Jennifer, wake up now.' " It's been a whirlwind four months promoting "Dreamgirls", she said. "Oh my goodness, it done wore me out." The rookie actress got a lot of help creating the role of Effie, she admitted, especially from her director, Bill Condon, who wasn't nominated. "He gave me that chance and walked me through it all," Hudson said. "He directed me. I don't know if I'd be sitting here right now as a Golden Globe nominee if he hadn't given me that great direction. He's such an amazing director. I'm going to create him an award myself." On the set, Jamie Foxx gave her acting tips, while Beyonce Knowles helped her with the dance moves. "I tried to do whatever I could to make Effie real," Hudson said. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Slater taking his act to CAA

11 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Christian Slater has signed with CAA. The actor, onscreen in Emilio Estevez's feature film Bobby, recently portrayed Randle P. McMurphy in the London stage production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and had a guest-starring role on the NBC comedy series My Name Is Earl. His upcoming films include the 2007 Sundance Film Festival submission Slipstream, written and directed by Anthony Hopkins; He Was a Quiet Man, with William H. Macy; and the Weinstein Co.'s animated Igor, also featuring the voices of John Cleese, Jeremy Piven, Steve Buscemi and Molly Shannon. Slater, who was with ICM, continues to be repped by Untitled Entertainment and Hansen, Jacobson, Teller and Hoberman. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Dubai fest promises diverse slate

28 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

As it enters its third year, the Dubai International Film Festival, which kicks off with Emilio Estevez's Bobby on Dec. 10, promises a vast lineup of international films, including one of the largest displays of Arabic films from the Gulf States, the Middle East and North Africa.

Some 115 films from 47 countries have been scheduled to screen during the 8-day event, which has lined up celebrity guests from Hollywood, Bollywood and the Arab world.

"We are featuring more films than ever before and we have cast the net wide geographically as well," festival chairman Abdulhamid Juma said in a statement. "Festival guests will be able to see a Moroccan film in the morning, an African film in the afternoon and a Hollywood offering in the evening."

Juma added that the festival was particularly proud of the extent of its Arab programming, which he said the festival "will continue to expand as part as part of our mandate to stimulate Arabic filmmaking."

The festival's program is divided among films in and out of competition. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Bobby

15 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

This review was written for the film festival screening of "Bobby".VENICE, Italy -- Set among the guests and staff at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles on the day in 1968 when presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was murdered, "Bobby" is a sentimental love letter from writer-director Emilio Estevez to his hometown and the slain politician. A well-crafted piece with a large ensemble cast featuring some big names, the film's success will depend on whether audiences respond to its rose-tinted view of Los Angeles in the late 1960s and its clear belief that RFK was a saint.

With its strong liberal bias, the picture will appeal to nostalgic left-leaning audiences in the U.S. It might well prosper internationally as it presents a very different face of American politics from the one on offer from the current administration.

Estevez obviously is one of the many who believe that Bobby Kennedy traveled from his bullying younger days via the Damascus road, picking up an epiphany along the way that made him America's last great hope following the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

"Bobby" features many clips showing RFK addressing campaign audiences and by the time he ran for president, he was certainly talking the talk. Its preamble also uses real footage to set the scene showing bombs falling in Vietnam, the march on Selma, President Johnson's resignation and the Cesar Chavez protests.

Estevez focuses, however, on the people at the Ambassador who include hotel fixture John Casey (Anthony Hopkins), who will reminisce about its glamorous history at every opportunity and always has time for a chess game in the lobby with his old pal Nelson (Harry Belafonte).

There's also hotel manager Paul (William H. Macy), who is married to Miriam Sharon Stone) but having an affair with Angela (Heather Graham), one of the switchboard operators. Well liked and a committed Democrat, Paul fires the hotel's racist catering manager, Timmons (Christian Slater), after he declines to let his staff of blacks and Latinos off work to vote.

Estevez does a good job of cutting between many story elements that cover Kennedy's political team at work. In the kitchen, blacks and Latinos strive to get along. Guests include a businessman (Martin Sheen) and his self-conscious younger wife (Helen Hunt); a drunken singer (Demi Moore) and her unhappy husband (Estevez); a young woman (Lindsay Lohan), getting married to save her groom (Elijah Wood) from Vietnam; and a would-be actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead), who works in the coffee shop and tries to help two very stoned Kennedy volunteers (Brian Geraghty and Shia LaBeouf), high on LSD purchased from a whacked-out dealer played by Ashton Kutcher.

The dialogue is heavy with aspiration and regret. Laurence Fishburn has a good scene lecturing on racial pragmatism. Hopkins and Belafonte reflect wryly on growing old, and so do Stone and Moore, though in a very different way.

Cultural references are used cleverly with Los Angeles Dodger Don Drysdale's effort to achieve six straight shutouts on everybody's mind, and people talking about such films as "The Graduate" and "Planet of the Apes".

Cinematographer Michael Barrett captures Patti Podesta's production design in expert fashion. Editor Richard Chew helps Estevez keep all the identities clear as the events of the day gather pace. Mark Isham's score is as expert as usual.

As the climax nears, Simon and Garfunkel's "The Sound of Silence" plays. Whether or not Bobby Kennedy was the man his supporters believed him to be, the film makes a persuasive case that something important in America was silenced when he was gunned down.

»

Permalink | Report a problem


Bobby

15 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

This review was written for the film festival screening of "Bobby".VENICE, Italy -- Set among the guests and staff at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles on the day in 1968 when presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was murdered, "Bobby" is a sentimental love letter from writer-director Emilio Estevez to his hometown and the slain politician. A well-crafted piece with a large ensemble cast featuring some big names, the film's success will depend on whether audiences respond to its rose-tinted view of Los Angeles in the late 1960s and its clear belief that RFK was a saint.

With its strong liberal bias, the picture will appeal to nostalgic left-leaning audiences in the U.S. It might well prosper internationally as it presents a very different face of American politics from the one on offer from the current administration.

Estevez obviously is one of the many who believe that Bobby Kennedy traveled from his bullying younger days via the Damascus road, picking up an epiphany along the way that made him America's last great hope following the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

"Bobby" features many clips showing RFK addressing campaign audiences and by the time he ran for president, he was certainly talking the talk. Its preamble also uses real footage to set the scene showing bombs falling in Vietnam, the march on Selma, President Johnson's resignation and the Cesar Chavez protests.

Estevez focuses, however, on the people at the Ambassador who include hotel fixture John Casey (Anthony Hopkins), who will reminisce about its glamorous history at every opportunity and always has time for a chess game in the lobby with his old pal Nelson (Harry Belafonte).

There's also hotel manager Paul (William H. Macy), who is married to Miriam Sharon Stone) but having an affair with Angela (Heather Graham), one of the switchboard operators. Well liked and a committed Democrat, Paul fires the hotel's racist catering manager, Timmons (Christian Slater), after he declines to let his staff of blacks and Latinos off work to vote.

Estevez does a good job of cutting between many story elements that cover Kennedy's political team at work. In the kitchen, blacks and Latinos strive to get along. Guests include a businessman (Martin Sheen) and his self-conscious younger wife (Helen Hunt); a drunken singer (Demi Moore) and her unhappy husband (Estevez); a young woman (Lindsay Lohan), getting married to save her groom (Elijah Wood) from Vietnam; and a would-be actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead), who works in the coffee shop and tries to help two very stoned Kennedy volunteers (Brian Geraghty and Shia LaBeouf), high on LSD purchased from a whacked-out dealer played by Ashton Kutcher.

The dialogue is heavy with aspiration and regret. Laurence Fishburn has a good scene lecturing on racial pragmatism. Hopkins and Belafonte reflect wryly on growing old, and so do Stone and Moore, though in a very different way.

Cultural references are used cleverly with Los Angeles Dodger Don Drysdale's effort to achieve six straight shutouts on everybody's mind, and people talking about such films as "The Graduate" and "Planet of the Apes".

Cinematographer Michael Barrett captures Patti Podesta's production design in expert fashion. Editor Richard Chew helps Estevez keep all the identities clear as the events of the day gather pace. Mark Isham's score is as expert as usual.

As the climax nears, Simon and Garfunkel's "The Sound of Silence" plays. Whether or not Bobby Kennedy was the man his supporters believed him to be, the film makes a persuasive case that something important in America was silenced when he was gunned down.

»

Permalink | Report a problem


London Film Fest opens with 'Scotland'

19 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

LONDON -- This year's Times BFI London Film Festival kicked off Wednesday evening with the unspooling of Kevin Macdonald's fictional feature debut The Last King Of Scotland at the Odeon Leicester Square. The red carpet gala, one of a baker's dozen of special gala events programd by the organizers of the 50th edition of the U.K.'s largest non-competitive film festival, was introduced to a packed house by festival director Sandra Hebron. Oscar winner Macdonald was on hand to introduce his film. The next two weeks will see a host of glittering events in the U.K. capital, with gala bows from the U.S. including Emilio Estevez's Bobby, John Cameron Mitchell's Shortbus and Stranger Than Fiction, directed by Marc Forster. To help celebrate the festival's 50th year, organizers are planning to make "behind the scenes" video podcasts available to subscribers. The festival runs Oct. 18-Nov. 2. »

Permalink | Report a problem


London Film Fest opens with 'Scotland'

18 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

LONDON -- This year's Times BFI London Film Festival kicked off Wednesday evening with the unspooling of Kevin Macdonald's fictional feature debut The Last King Of Scotland at the Odeon Leicester Square. The red carpet gala, one of a baker's dozen of special gala events programd by the organizers of the 50th edition of the U.K.'s largest non-competitive film festival, was introduced to a packed house by festival director Sandra Hebron. Oscar winner Macdonald was on hand to introduce his movie debut. The next two weeks will see a host of glittering events in the U.K. capital, with gala bows from the U.S. including Emilio Estevez's directorial debut Bobby, John Cameron Mitchell's Shortbus and Stranger Than Fiction, directed by Marc Forster. To help celebrate the festival's 50th year, organizers are planning to make "behind the scenes" video podcasts available to subscribers. The festival runs Oct. 18-Nov. 2. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Kennedys Approve of 'Bobby' Biopic

10 October 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

The Kennedy family has given its approval to the upcoming Robert F. Kennedy biopic Bobby written and directed by Emilio Estevez. The film revisits the night Kennedy was assassinated at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles in 1968. Kennedy's widow Ethel says, "Our family is grateful to Emilio Estevez and the extraordinary cast of Bobby for remembering Robert Kennedy's life and his commitment to social justice, peace and equality. Hopefully the film will inspire a new generation to make gentle the life of the world." The movie opens on limited release in the US on November 17 and nationwide on November 23. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Fountain,' 'Empire' set for AFI

4 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain and David Lynch's Inland Empire will be featured as Centerpiece Galas at AFI Fest 2006. In addition, the fest said Tuesday, it will present An Evening With Ed Zwick, with the director showing footage from his upcoming film, Blood Diamond. AFI Fest, which opens with Emilio Estevez's Bobby, runs Nov. 1-12 at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood. Inland Empire, starring Laura Dern in a dual role, will screen Nov. 3. Fountain, a time-travel love story, will screen Nov. 11 at Hollywood's Grauman's Chinese Theatre. As previously announced, Pedro Almodovar's Volver also will receive a gala screening Nov. 2. Zwick will speak about his career Nov. 8. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Bobby' will bow at AFI's opening night

19 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Emilio Estevez's Bobby has been selected to serve as the opening-night film at AFI Fest, the American Film Institute's annual festival, which kicks off Nov. 1 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. Written and directed by Estevez, Bobby, which revisits the night Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles in 1968, will have its U.S. premiere at the fest, which runs through Nov. 12. MGM will release the Weinstein Co. film Nov. 17. "This is a film that chronicles a powerful moment in American history -- a moment that is also significant in the history of the city of Los Angeles," AFI president and CEO Jean Picker Firstenberg said. "As AFI Fest celebrates its 20th year, we are especially proud to premiere this film here." »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Still' fits Venice bill as top film

11 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

VENICE, Italy -- The last-minute entry in competition at the 63rd Venice Film Festival was awarded the event's top prize Saturday, when Jia Zhang-Ke stunned observers by taking home the coveted Golden Lion for his film Sanxia Haoren (Still Life). The film was a last-minute addition in competition, its name withheld until Sept. 5 because of sensitivities related to acquiring the proper permissions from Chinese censors. It only screened twice on the Lido, and in a poll of 14 leading Italian critics taken on the eve of the closing ceremony, not one listed the film among their top three choices. When its name was announced, it attracted only scattered applause from the flabbergasted crowd in the Palazzo del Cinema. But the film was a hit with the jury, winning the prize over such favorites as Emilio Estevez's Bobby, Stephen Frears' The Queen and Nuovomondo (Golden Door) from Emanuele Crialese. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Still' fits Venice bill as top film

11 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

VENICE, Italy -- The last-minute entry in competition at the 63rd Venice Film Festival was awarded the event's top prize Saturday, when Jia Zhang-Ke stunned observers by taking home the coveted Golden Lion for his film Sanxia Haoren (Still Life). The film was a last-minute addition in competition, its name withheld until Sept. 5 because of sensitivities related to acquiring the proper permissions from Chinese censors. It only screened twice on the Lido, and in a poll of 14 leading Italian critics taken on the eve of the closing ceremony, not one listed the film among their top three choices. When its name was announced, it attracted only scattered applause from the flabbergasted crowd in the Palazzo del Cinema. But the film was a hit with the jury, winning the prize over such favorites as Emilio Estevez's Bobby, Stephen Frears' The Queen and Nuovomondo (Golden Door) from Emanuele Crialese. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Bobby

6 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

VENICE, Italy -- Set among the guests and staff at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles on the day in 1968 when presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was murdered, "Bobby" is a sentimental love letter from writer-director Emilio Estevez to his hometown and the slain politician. A well-crafted piece with a large ensemble cast featuring some big names, the film's success will depend on whether audiences respond to its rose-tinted view of Los Angeles in the late 1960s and its clear belief that RFK was a saint.

With its strong liberal bias, the picture will appeal to nostalgic left-leaning audiences in the U.S. It might well prosper internationally as it presents a very different face of American politics from the one on offer from the current administration.

Estevez obviously is one of the many who believe that Bobby Kennedy traveled from his bullying younger days via the Damascus road, picking up an epiphany along the way that made him America's last great hope following the death of Martin Luther King Jr.

"Bobby" features many clips showing RFK addressing campaign audiences and by the time he ran for president, he was certainly talking the talk. Its preamble also uses real footage to set the scene showing bombs falling in Vietnam, the march on Selma and the Cesar Chavez protests.

Estevez focuses, however, on the people at the Ambassador who include hotel fixture John Casey (Anthony Hopkins), who will reminisce about its glamorous history at every opportunity and always has time for a chess game in the lobby with his old pal Nelson (Harry Belafonte).

There's also hotel manager Paul (William H. Macy), who is married to Miriam Sharon Stone) but having an affair with Angela (Heather Graham), one of the switchboard operators. Well liked and a committed Democrat, Paul fires the hotel's racist catering manager, Timmons (Christian Slater), after he declines to let his staff of blacks and Latinos off work to vote.

Estevez does a good job of cutting between many story elements that cover Kennedy's political team at work. In the kitchen, blacks and Latinos strive to get along. Guests include a businessman (Martin Sheen) and his self-conscious younger wife (Helen Hunt); a drunken singer (Demi Moore) and her unhappy husband (Estevez); a young woman (Lindsay Lohan), getting married to save her groom (Elijah Wood) from Vietnam; and a would-be actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead), who works in the coffee shop and tries to help two very stoned Kennedy volunteers (Brian Geraghty and Shia LaBeouf), high on LSD purchased from a whacked-out dealer played by Ashton Kutcher.

The dialogue is heavy with aspiration and regret. Laurence Fishburn has a good scene lecturing on racial pragmatism. Hopkins and Belafonte reflect wryly on growing old, and so do Stone and Moore, though in a very different way.

Cultural references are used cleverly with Los Angeles Dodger Don Drysdale's effort to achieve six straight shutouts on everybody's mind, and people talking about such films as "The Graduate" and "Planet of the Apes".

Cinematographer Michael Barrett captures Patti Podesta's production design in expert fashion. Editor Richard Chew helps Estevez keep all the identities clear as the events of the day gather pace. Mark Isham's score is as expert as usual.

As the climax nears, Simon and Garfunkel's "The Sound of Silence" plays. Whether or not Bobby Kennedy was the man his supporters believed him to be, the film makes a persuasive case that something important in America was silenced when he was gunned down.

BOBBY

MGM

Bold Films/The Weinstein Co./Arclight Films

Credits:

Screenwriter-director: Emilio Estevez

Producers: Edward Bass, Michael Litvak, Holly Wiersma

Executive producers: Daniel Grodnik, Gary Michael Walters, Anthony Hopkins

Cinematographer: Michael Barrett

Production designer: Patti Podesta

Music: Mark Isham

Editor: Richard Chew

Cast:

Nelson: Harry Belafonte

Patricia: Joy Bryant

Dwayne: Nick Cannon

Tim Fallon: Emilio Estevez

Edward Robinson: Laurence Fishburne

Cooper: Brian Geraghty

Angela: Heather Graham

John Casey: Anthony Hopkins

Samantha: Helen Hunt

Wade Buckley: Joshua Jackson

Jimmy: Shia LaBeouf

Diane: Lindsay Lohan

Paul: William H. Macy

Lenka Janacek: Svetlana Metkina

Virginia Fallon: Demi Moore

Jose: Freddy Rodriguez

Jack: Martin Sheen

Timmons: Christian Slater

Miriam: Sharon Stone

Miguel: Jacob Vargas

Susan Taylor: Mary Elizabeth Winstead

William: Elijah Wood

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 120 minutes »

Permalink | Report a problem


Weinstein Co. takes 'Bobby' rights

16 March 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

NEW YORK -- The Weinstein Co. nabbed all domestic rights to Emilio Estevez's Bobby, the story of how presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy's 1968 assassination affected the lives of people in the hotel where it occurred. Estevez wrote and directed the Bold Films production, which sports an all-star ensemble including the once-engaged Estevez and Demi Moore as a romantically linked pair of down-and-out entertainers. "It's an enormous canvas," Estevez said. "The Ambassador Hotel serves as a microcosm for everything happening in the world at that time, (including) racial tension and social upheaval." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Thank you for Nothing!

25 January 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- At the Sundance screening of Jason Reitman’s (son of Ivan Reitman, Ghosbusters) “Thank You for Smoking”, a 12 second sex scene showcasing Katie Holme’s natural born talents was suspiciously absent, and many theorize that Tom Cruise was somehow involved. What I Do believe, and bear with me on this, is that Tom went all Ethan Hunt on their asses and made the changes himself, you know, all cloak & dagger-like. You don’t star in two Mission: Impossible movies (one highly entertaining, the other gut-wrenchingly painful to watch… I’ll let you guess which one, go ahead, I’ll wait…) without learning a few tricks of the trade, especially after faking performing most of your own stunts. I visualize Tom/Ethan repelling down from the unusually high editing room ceiling, knocking out a few guards and the film editor, and then proceeding to cut out his goiter’s future wife’s scene, »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2001 | 2000

19 items from 2006


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners