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1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Atom Egoyan pays tribute to Martin Landau by Anne-Katrin Titze

17 July 2017 9:40 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Martin Landau starred opposite Christopher Plummer in Atom Egoyan's Remember

In 2016, when I spoke with Atom Egoyan about his film Remember, I commented to him that Alfred Hitchcock's North By Northwest came to mind and not only because of Martin Landau. His response was: "I think it's embedded in the script. I feel there is a lot of Hitchcock in this film. This idea of a character being manipulated by a plan or a machine that's outside of his control or his apprehension … It's strange, I remember talking with him [Landau] about shooting North By Northwest when we worked together many years ago. But I can't say it was conscious or deliberate."

Atom Egoyan on Martin Landau: "A great actor has left this stage with an astonishing body of work which we will remember and cherish." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

During my conversation at the Museum of Tolerance in New »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Martin Landau dies at 89 by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-07-17 07:19:54

16 July 2017 11:19 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Atom Egoyan's Remember: Zev (Christopher Plummer) with Max Rosenbaum (Martin Landau)

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau has died, aged 89.

His publicist said the star had passed away in Los Angeles on Saturday following "unexpected complications during a short hospitalisation".

Landau, who was nominated for a best supporting actor Oscar for Crimes And Misdemeanours and went on to win one for his portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Ed Wood, was also known for his roles as Rollin Hand in the long-running TV series Mission: Impossible.

He began his career as a cartoonist, moving into film around five years later. His film work would go on to include films as diverse as North By North West, Cleopatra and, more recently, Atom Egoyan's Remember. In an interview with Eye For Film's Anne-Katrin Titze, Egoyan spoke about working with Landau on an episode of Alfred Hitchcock presents, 30 years earlier. He said: "I »

- Amber Wilkinson

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Martin Landau, Legendary ‘Ed Wood’ and ‘North by Northwest’ Actor, Dies at 89

16 July 2017 5:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Martin Landau, a screen giant who brought his one-of-a-kind talents to Hollywood for more than 60 years, has died at 89. TMZ first reported the news, stating that the actor died yesterday of “unexpected complications” after briefly being hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center.

Read MoreGeorge Romero, Horror Icon and ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Director, Dies at 77

Landau won a richly deserved Academy Award for his role as Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton’s “Ed Wood,” having previously been nominated for both “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Tucker: The Man and His Dream”; he also had three Golden Globes, six Emmy nominations, a BAFTA nod and several lifetime achievement awards to his name. More than that, though, he had an inimitable screen presence that both delighted and, when called for, unsettled.

Landau first came to wide attention for his performance in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest,” going on to appear in “Cleopatra, »

- Michael Nordine

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Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

16 July 2017 5:25 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career.  His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in »

- Carmel Dagan

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Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood’ Dies, at 89

16 July 2017 5:25 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career.  His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in »

- Carmel Dagan

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New to Streaming: ‘Punch-Drunk Love,’ ‘Free Fire,’ ‘The Salesman,’ and More

7 July 2017 5:01 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Best in Show (Christopher Guest)

Christopher Guest has had an exceptionally strong ’00s with A Mighty Wind and For Your Consideration, and it remains to be seen how his upcoming Mascots will be received, but his arguable peak is still the gloriously funny mockumentary Best in Show. Guest’s other films have lovingly skewered egotistical oddballs and the insanity of subjective or objective criticism, so Best in Show is »

- Jordan Raup

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How ‘Poison’ Distributor Zeitgeist Films Found a Lifeline in Kino Lorber

23 June 2017 12:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Zeitgeist Films and Kino Lorber have always been kindred spirits, but as of this week, the indie distributors are officially strategic partners, a business relationship that has been in works for the past six months. Richard Lorber’s arthouse distribution company has formed a multi-year alliance with Nancy Gerstman and Emily Russo’s Zeitgeist that will see the two companies co-acquire four to five theatrical titles per year that will be marketed and released by Zeitgeist Films, starting with the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival audience award-winner “The Divine Order.” Directed by Petra Volpe, the film tells the story of a young housewife in Switzerland in 1971 who stands up to the closed-minded villagers in her town and overthrows the status quo.

Read More: Beyond A24: How Hip New Distributors Are Targeting Millennial Tastemakers With Bold Films

“We were at Tribeca and covered every film that we could get our eyes on, but we totally missed ‘The Divine Order’ for some reason,” Lorber said. “Nancy and Emily said it was great, we committed to doing it, and two days later it won the audience prize at Tribeca.”

Founded in 1988, Zeitgeist film’s is known for having distributed early films by directors including Todd Hayes (“Poison”), Christopher Nolan (“Following”), Laura Poitras (“The Oath”) and Atom Egoyan (“Speaking Parts”), but has struggled in recent years to adapt to the changing landscape for indie distributors.

“There’s no denying the fact that the business has gotten tougher, and I think over the years Zeitgeist has maintained an almost artisanal approach, which has not always kept pace with some of the other opportunities that have been available, such as the expansion of digital and alternative venues that films can play in,” Lorber said. Going forward, Kino Lorber will become the exclusive distributor of all Zeitgeist films for the home video, educational, and digital media markets, adding Zeitgeist’s roughly 130-film library to its collection of 1,600 titles.

“Once home video sort of ended as a possibility for us, we really had to go into the digital realm, and dealing with five or six films a year, it’s difficult to really bulk up your digital [catalog] to be able to do the sort of deals that Kino Lorber is able to do,” Gerstman said. “It’s been very tough, so these are really great resources for us to be able to have.

Read More: Hybrid Distribution: One-Night-Only Screenings Could Make Your Documentary a Theatrical Hit

Kino Lorber will release two of Zeitgeist’s 2016 films, the biographical documentary “Eva Hesse” and “Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt.” Zeitgeist’s 2001 film “Nowhere in Africa” won the Academy Award for best foreign language film, taking more than $6 million at the U.S. box office. Some of the company’s most successful theatrical releases include “Bill Cunningham: New York,” “The Corporation” and “Aimee & Jaguar.”

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- Graham Winfrey

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How Kickstarter Turned Hal Hartley Into the Tech Visionary He Always Wanted to Be

21 June 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Back in 2004, Hal Hartley directed “The Girl from Monday” and tried to launch a website where viewers could watch the film. Since the average internet speed back then was 34 Kbps — about 165 times slower than today’s 5.6 Mbps — that didn’t work so well. “The technology was still a little sticky,” Hartley said. “We ended up distributing it in a more traditional way, where I would travel all over the place with the film and do Q&As.”

With films like “Trust,” “Amateur,” and “Henry Fool,” Hartley’s movies have never been about the money — but he’s always had his eye on the bottom line. He owns 50% of every film he’s made, and constantly seeks to capitalize on technology as a way to achieve independence and financial sustainability.

Read More: Why the ‘Swiss Army Man’ Directors Backed the Psychedelic Comedy-Musical ‘Snowy Bing Bongs’

With Kickstarter, he raised more than $56,000 on DVD presales for his 2011 film, “Meanwhile,” and then raised a production budget of nearly $400,000 from 1,789 backers for his 2014 film, “Ned Rifle.” “‘Ned Rifle’ became my most successful movie to date, and I didn’t need to share that money,” he said. “It all came directly to me and the crew.”

Read More: How a Chance Encounter With Terrence Malick Turned Trey Edward Shults Into a Filmmaker

Ned Rifle” was the final installment of the Grim family trilogy, one that included “Henry Fool” in 1997 and “Fay Grim” in 2006. The Kickstarter process taught Hartley that he had loyal fans in places like Japan, Australia, Europe, and Taiwan who were invested in his work. Now he’s testing that direct connection with Kickstarter to pre-sell a Grim family box set, complete with subtitles. 

“I’m going to do the box set, no matter what,” said Hartley. “I really do want to make this approach to distributing my own film viable on its own. That’s why I’m gambling with this. My gambit here is the subtitling. That’s what is expensive about the undertaking, and why I’m going after $100,000. Four foreign languages translated accurately and sensitively, and then the authoring of that onto the DVD — it gets expensive. I’m just hoping the expense is worth it because it will help films contribute a wider audience around the world.”

See MoreHal Hartley’s Grim Family: An Oral History From ‘Henry Fool’ to ‘Ned Rifle

Hartley says he’s talked with Atom Egoyan (“Sweet Hereafter,” “Exotica”) about the value of owning their work, since handling the various aspects of the business requires a full-time staff. Sustaining that support requires more work, and Hartley feels fortunate that the world of television has begun opening to him.

“Since I came back to America in 2009, I’ve worked for five years to get people interested in my TV projects – because I’ve been interested in episodic television for a long time,” he saidy. “I was also open to just being a director for hire. I saw a lot of half-hour comedy shows that were well written and said, ‘I can see myself directing that.'”

Read More: The 20 Best-Directed TV Drama Series of the 21st Century, Ranked

The veteran filmmaker got his TV break when he ran into Gregory Jacobs, his former first assistant director who had gone on to work for Steven Soderbergh and got his own television show, “Red Oaks,” on Amazon. Jacobs invited Hartley to direct an episode in season one, then half of the second season (five episodes). Starting next week, he will share season-three directing duties with David Gordon Green and Amy Heckerling.

“On my films, I’m thinking on a hundred different levels at any moment,” said Hartley. “While coming in to direct ‘Red Oaks’ — which is a script I take to very easily, it’s the kind of comedy I know how to do — what they expect of me is just to give it some character, explain to the actors the things that might not be perfectly obvious, and make the day, get all the shots. So it’s nice. I come away from a day’s work feeling good, like I’m a good skilled laborer.”

And is Hartley any closer to getting his own TV show?

“I’m developing something with Amazon. They optioned at least the pilot of my [half hour comedy] show,” said Hartley. “It’s about nuns who make beer to support themselves and they’re social activists, so they are wanted by the cops.”

Hal Hartley’s new Henry Fool Trilogy boxed set is part of Kickstarter Gold, a new initiative bringing back some of the most inventive and successful creators in Kickstarter history. Now through July 31, over 65 exceptional artists, authors, designers, musicians and makers are back as they push ideas and rewards from their past projects in bold new directions. Head here to learn more, and here to browse all the live Kickstarter Gold projects.

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- Chris O'Falt

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Simon Beaufoy to Adapt ‘In the Skin of a Lion’ From ‘English Patient’ Author

19 June 2017 8:36 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

British screenwriter Simon Beaufoy has signed on to adapt the immigrant story “In the Skin of a Lion” as a movie for Serendipity Point Films, UK’s Film4 and Potboiler Films.

Serendipity’s Robert Lantos (“Barney’s Version,” “Eastern Promises”) and Potboiler’s Andrea Calderwood (“A Most Wanted Man,” “The Last King of Scotland”) will produce.

The project is based on Michael Ondaatje’s 1987 novel about the lives of immigrants who played a large role in the building of the city of Toronto in the early 1900s. The story focuses on romance and class conflict amidst the clash between immigrant workers and the ruling elite.

“In the Heart of a Lion” introduced the characters Hana and David Caravaggio, who were also in Ondaatje’s 1992 novel “The English Patient.” The Anthony Minghella adaptation of the novel won nine Academy Awards, including best picture and best supporting actress for Juliette Binoche in the role of Hana. »

- Dave McNary

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Sarajevo to fete Joshua Oppenheimer

22 May 2017 4:21 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Act Of Killing director will deliver a festival masterclass.

This year’s Sarajevo Film Festival (August 11-18) will pay tribute to documentarian Joshua Oppenheimer.

The two-time Oscar nominee will attend the festival to participate in a masterclass and audience Q&A session.

His films The Act Of Killing and The Look Of Silence – both hard-hitting documentaries about genocide in Indonesia - will also be screened at the festival.

Oppenheimer’s next projects include two narrative features, one of which is a musical inspired by Samuel Beckett’s play Happy Days.

In recent years, Sarajevo has feted directors including Amat Escalante, Brillante Mendoza, Atom Egoyan and Michael Winterbottom. »

- tom.grater@screendaily.com (Tom Grater)

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Cannes: ‘Rotterdam’ and ‘Berlin, I Love You’ Films to Shoot This Summer

20 May 2017 10:15 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Rotterdam, I Love You” and “Berlin, I Love You,” the latest two film in the Cities of Love franchise, will shoot this summer. Both aim to be ready for the major festivals in their home cities in early 2018.

Mike Figgis, Claire Denis, Pablo Trapero and John Maybury are among the international directors joining local Dutch filmmakers Martin Koolhoven, Paula van der Oest, Joost van Ginkel, Koen Mortier, new voices Barry Atsma and Shariff Nasr, and previously announced Atom Egoyan on the anthology film.

The production was announced at the Cannes Film Festival by producers Matt Jaems and Joeri Pruys. The film has 11 connected segments plus interstitial material and will start shooting July 18.

The Berlin film, shooting in June, involves Patrick Dempsey and Renee Zellweger making their directorial debuts alongside Massy Tadjedin, Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, Shekhar KapurTom Van Avermaet and Fernando Eimbcke, Til Schweiger, Dennis Gansel and Dani Levy. »

- Patrick Frater

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‘Cities of Love’ Continues to Grow

16 May 2017 6:33 AM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

The film “Rotterdam, I Love You”, like the previous entries in the ‘Cities of Love’ series, will be a kaleidoscope of stories about love in all kinds of interpretations. Every single segment has its own perspective and its own personal style, woven into the rhythm of this unique city by 11 different directors.

The creative team consists of 11 directors, 20 to 30 wonderful actors in main roles, top producers and screenwriters. The 11 directors will range from Dutch up-and-coming talents to internationally acclaimed directors from all over the world, including Koen Mortier, Paula van der Oest (“Zeus and Zo”), Barry Atsma, Shariff Nasr (“Oblivion”) and Atom Egoyan (“The Sweet Hereafter”). The Cities of Love family of directors already includes people like The Coen Brothers, Brett Ratner, Wes Craven, Guillermo Arriaga, Alexander Payne, as well as Natalie Portman, Scarlett Johansson and more.

“Rotterdam, I Love You” will show the real Rotterdam, in all its rough beauty, »

- Sydney Levine

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‘Master of None’ Returns, ‘I Love Dick’ Debuts, Plus More TV You Must See This Week

7 May 2017 10:38 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Another one of our favorite shows is back this week, as the whole of Master of None’s Season 2 hits Netflix, and one of the most hopeful new series of the year, Amazon’s I Love Dick, makes its leap from pilot to full first season the same day. There’s also the end of the first season of Riverdale, more Fargo and Better Call Saul, a must-see installment of Saturday Night Live, reason to check out the new sitcom Great News, and why we’re paying attention to the MTV Movie Awards this year.

To help you keep track of the most important programs over the next seven days, here’s our guide to everything worth watching, whether it’s on broadcast, cable, or streaming for May 7–13 (all times Eastern):

SUNDAY2017 MTV Movie and TV Awards (MTV, 8pm)

Yeah, it’s MTV, and yes they still have awards like “Best Kiss,” but »

- Christopher Campbell

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Telefilm Canada issues statement as directors voice merger fears

20 April 2017 10:05 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

April 21 Update: Executive director of film body ‘touched by support’.

Carolle Brabant, the executive director of Telefilm Canada, has released a statement in light of a protest letter by leading Canadian directors voicing concern over rumours the body will merge with the Canada Media Fund.

Denis Villeneuve and David Cronenberg are among 51 signatories who wrote to the government this week as it conducts a review of culture policy in the digital age.

Brabant’s statement issued late on Thursday night said: “We’re touched by the support expressed by Canadian directors and producers for Telefilm Canada’s mandate. As we celebrate our 50th anniversary, Telefilm’s commitment to developing and promoting Canadian filmmaking talent is as strong as ever.

“As reflected in our 11-year partnership with the Canada Media Fund, we constantly seek to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of funding program delivery, especially in today’s multiplatform environment.

“We understand the industry wanting to be part »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Canadian directors protest Telefilm Canada merger rumours

20 April 2017 4:05 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Denis Villeneuve, David Cronenberg among signatories in letter to government.

Fifty-one Canadian directors have written to prime minster Justin Trudeau and heritage minster Melanie Joly protesting what they believe to be a government proposal to merge Telefilm Canada with the Canada Media Fund (Cmf).

The Liberal government is reviewing culture policy in the digital age and the signatories to the letter believe a merger is on the table.

Toronto-based Globe And Mail ran an excerpt of the letter, whose signatories include Denis Villeneuve, David Cronenberg, Atom Egoyan, Denys Arcand, Deepa Mehta, Xavier Dolan, and Sarah Polley.

They wrote: “We are deeply concerned that if feature film investments are subsumed within a larger agency with a competing and unsympathetic mandate, its independence and efficacy will quickly erode.

“Merging filmmaker-driven Telefilm with broadcaster-driven Cmf would deal a devastating blow to Canadian cinema.”

Telefilm Canada administers public funds to support cinema and its involvement on a project triggers the release »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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‘The Beguiled’ Trailer: Sofia Coppola’s Palme d’Or Contender Is A Dark and Sexy Southern Revenge Tale

19 April 2017 3:11 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Watch out, Cannes. Sofia Coppola is coming for you.

On the heels of “The Beguiled’s” entry into the official competition at Cannes 2017, Focus Features has released the new trailer for the Southern Gothic revenge movie. Let’s just say it’s a dark and twisted ride that suggests Coppola might just have the indie hit of the summer on her hands. Having Nicole Kidman, Elle Fanning, Kirsten Dunst and Colin Farrell front and center doesn’t hurt either.

Read More: How Sofia Coppola Helped Kirsten Dunst Film an Intense Sex Scene in ‘The Beguiled

The Beguiled” is based on the 1966 Thomas Cullinan novel, which was previously adapted into a 1971 film starring Clint Eastwood. Coppola’s version will be told from the perspective of the story’s female characters. Nicole Kidman plays the headmistress of a secluded school for girls in 1864 Virginia. Their lifestyle is disrupted by the discovery of »

- Zack Sharf

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Celebrate National Canadian Film Day with six essential Canadian films

19 April 2017 9:42 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Celebrate National Canadian Film Day with six essential Canadian filmsCelebrate National Canadian Film Day with six essential Canadian filmsAdriana Floridia4/19/2017 11:42:00 Am

Today is National Canadian Film Day and there's no better way to celebrate than by watching Canadian movies!

Canadian films are largely underrated, but there are tons of filmmakers, both new and old, that are resurrecting the Canadian film scene. While Quebec has always had a strong presence in the film-making world, with directors like Xavier Dolan, Denis Villeneuve and Jean Marc Vallee constantly doing us proud, there's also a lot of great efforts from the English-speaking Canadian film realm, that we often forget about. Legends like David Cronenberg, Deepa Mehta and Guy Maddin have always made distinct, challenging work, and there's a new emerging scene--from the more established filmmakers like Jason Reitman and Sarah Polley, to a new crop of directors like Matt Johnson and Andrew Cividino. »

- Adriana Floridia

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Celebrate National Canadian Film Day with six essential Canadian films

19 April 2017 9:42 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Celebrate National Canadian Film Day with six essential Canadian filmsCelebrate National Canadian Film Day with six essential Canadian filmsAdriana Floridia4/19/2017 11:42:00 Am

Today is National Canadian Film Day and there's no better way to celebrate than by watching Canadian movies!

Canadian films are largely underrated, but there are tons of filmmakers, both new and old, that are resurrecting the Canadian film scene. While Quebec has always had a strong presence in the film-making world, with directors like Xavier Dolan, Denis Villeneuve and Jean Marc Vallee constantly doing us proud, there's also a lot of great efforts from the English-speaking Canadian film realm, that we often forget about. Legends like David Cronenberg, Deepa Mehta and Guy Maddin have always made distinct, challenging work, and there's a new emerging scene--from the more established filmmakers like Jason Reitman and Sarah Polley, to a new crop of directors like Matt Johnson and Andrew Cividino. »

- Adriana Floridia

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‘Somewhere Beautiful’ Clip: Ambitious Homage to Atom Egoyan’s ‘Calendar’ Bakes Up Something Tasty — Watch

19 April 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Somewhere Beautiful,” Albert Kodagolian’s tribute to Atom Egoyan’s classic “Calendar,” is a movie with layers, that’s for sure.

Shot on 16mm and 35mm film, Kodagolian split filming time between Argentina and Los Angeles, telling two different, intimate stories about human connection.

Read More: ‘The Little Hours’ Red Band Trailer: Aubrey Plaza and Alison Brie Are Nuns Gone Wild in Jeff Baena’s Sundance Comedy

In South America, the story revolves around a love triangle and a photographer’s doomed relationship. In California, Kodagolian creates an alternate reality of his own life when he films himself caring for his two-year-old daughter as his marriage collapses. Egoyan was deeply involved in the making of the film, creating a collaborative relationship with Kodagolian throughout.

French film star Dominique Pinon stars in the film, along with Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz, Pablo Cedron, Maria Alche, and Robyn Buck.

Somewhere Beautiful” opens in »

- Allison Picurro

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‘Menashe’ Trailer: Touching Yiddish Sundance Hit Goes Inside Brooklyn’s Hasidic Community — Watch

19 April 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Menashe” is the narrative debut for previous documentarian, Joshua Z. Weinstein. Almost entirely spoken in Yiddish, “Menashe” is set in the Hasidic community of Brooklyn’s Borough Park. The film combines beautiful fluidity and documentary emotional realism with subtle narrative structure.

Read More: ‘Menashe’ Review: A Hasidic Community Sets the Stage for a Touching Father-Son Drama — Sundance 2017

After the untimely death of his wife, Menashe tries to maintain a relationship with his son, Rieuven, while attempting to compromise, yet honor the traditions of a Hasidic life. With the strict nature of the community and the unyielding demands of his Rabbi, Menashe is unable to raise his son until he finds a new wife to create what his Rabbi believes to be a responsible living environment that Rieuven can thrive in.

The film gives a dramatized, yet powerfully insightful view on a community of individuals and the traditions that rule over their decision-making. »

- Kerry Levielle

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