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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

1-20 of 70 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


‘Star Trek’ Wants to Regulate Fan Culture, But It’s Not Going to Be Easy

18 July 2016 3:58 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

As of September 8, “Star Trek” will have officially been a part of American pop culture for 50 years, and it has one of the most robust and passionate fandoms in pop culture history. Fandom is basically a synonym for love — and “Star Trek” is currently in the process of telling some fans how to express their love.

It has been, to be frank, a bit of a mess.

How One Fan Film Set Things Off

In May 2016, one of the nerdiest things ever written was filed with the United States District Court. In a ruling by Judge R. Gary Klausner, His Honor declared that a lawsuit filed by Paramount Pictures and CBS Studios should proceed, because:

“Although the Court declines to address whether Plaintiffs’ Claims will prosper at this time, the Court does find Plaintiffs’ claims will live long enough to survive Defendants’ Motion to Dismiss.”

This followed many pages of »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Star Trek’ Wants to Regulate Fan Culture, But It’s Not Going to Be Easy

18 July 2016 3:58 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As of September 8, “Star Trek” will have officially been a part of American pop culture for 50 years, and it has one of the most robust and passionate fandoms in pop culture history. Fandom is basically a synonym for love — and “Star Trek” is currently in the process of telling some fans how to express their love.

It has been, to be frank, a bit of a mess.

How One Fan Film Set Things Off

In May 2016, one of the nerdiest things ever written was filed with the United States District Court. In a ruling by Judge R. Gary Klausner, His Honor declared that a lawsuit filed by Paramount Pictures and CBS Studios should proceed, because:

“Although the Court declines to address whether Plaintiffs’ Claims will prosper at this time, the Court does find Plaintiffs’ claims will live long enough to survive Defendants’ Motion to Dismiss.”

This followed many pages of »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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As World Events Turn Dark, Moviegoers Can’t Get Enough Talking Animals

15 July 2016 3:24 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hollywood is vexed by the lack of home runs at the box office this summer. But there is a bright spot amidst countless forecasts of trouble for the film industry. Two of the biggest smashes of the season so far, Disney’s “Finding Dory” and Universal Studios’ “The Secret Life of Pets,” are a reminder that animation is the one genre that seems to be unstoppable at the movies.

Beyond their reliance on pixelated performances, “Dory” and “Pets” share another similarity. They are both stories centered on animals that yammer about their personal lives, bicker and act like human beings. Against a questionable year of ticket sales, where even movie stars like Johnny Depp and George Clooney have come up short, audiences seem to prefer their personalities with tails.

These cuddly creatures are serving as an antidote to dark times in the world. Some executives in Hollywood are starting to »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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All the Original Ghostbusters

15 July 2016 8:49 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

A history of paranormal exterminators in pop culture pre-1984.

Anytime you have a remake or reboot of a popular movie or franchise, fans of the original are going to whine about it. With Ghostbusters, there’s a new level of objection, some of it stemming from the same sort of nostalgic ownership of any beloved property from childhood and some of it arising out of misogyny. The only thing they ought to be concerned with is whether or not fans of the new movie will recognize its roots. And that’s not exclusive to the 1984 movie it’s based on and its 1989 sequel, Ghostbusters II.

The Ghost Busters

Most famously, there was already something titled The Ghost Busters, a live-action TV series for children that ran for 15 episodes in 1975 and featured two men and a gorilla hunting mostly spirits and also sometimes famous monsters like Dracula and Dr. Frankenstein’s Creature. The »

- Christopher Campbell

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Nothing Can Prepare You For These Britney and Justin Throwback Pics

14 July 2016 3:40 PM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

The nostalgia gods have smiled down on you - we've rounded up a batch of throwback pictures of young, crazy-in-love Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake, and we imagine your hearts simply won't be able to handle it. The then-couple are all smiles and doe eyes in the adorable snaps both personal and from the red carpet, which also feature their former Mickey Mouse Club costar Nikki Deloach, Justin's *Nsync bandmates Lance Bass, Jc Chasez, Chris Kirkpatrick, and Joey Fatone, and a young Fergie, who may or may not have still been a member of the girl group Wild Orchid. Among the sweet pictures is also photo of a love-struck Britney gazing at Justin while he plays the piano and one of Justin sitting on Britney's lap as they celebrate Christmas together. Basically, we dug these photos out of a time capsule with the sole purpose of tugging at your heartstrings and making you really, »

- Brittney Stephens

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‘Orchestrating Change’ Profiles a Group Using Classical Music to Change Perceptions of Mental Illness

13 July 2016 9:26 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Here’s your daily dose of an indie film, web series, TV pilot, what-have-you in progress — at the end of the week, you’ll have the chance to vote for your favorite.

In the meantime: Is this a project you’d want to see? Tell us in the comments.

Orchestrating Change

Logline: The documentary film that tells the inspiring story of Me2/Orchestra, the only classical music organization in the world for people living with mental illness and those who support them.

Elevator Pitch:

Ronald Braunstein, Me2/Orchestra’s founder and music director, was a Juilliard-trained, internationally-known conductor until he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Ronald’s manager dropped him and the classical music community shunned him. Ronald created Me2/Orchestra for musicians like himself living with mental illness. The documentary “Orchestrating Change” depicts the poignant and powerful ways Me2/Orchestra is transforming lives and creating a new model for »

- Steve Greene

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Preview of Mickey Mouse Shorts: Season One #1

12 July 2016 6:15 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Idw and Disney Comics launch a new series this week, adapting a selection of award-winning animated shorts with Mickey Mouse Shorts: Season One, and we’ve got a preview of the first issue for you here…

Join Mickey, Minnie and all their pals in a comic adaptation of the celebrated, multi-Emmy and Annie Award-winning shorts from Disney Television Animation! In this issue, Mickey battles his way through a Tokyo bullet train during rush hour, an unlikely character competes in a dog show, and Donald suffers from….Flipperboobootosis?! And that’s just the start!

Mickey Mouse Shorts: Season One #1 is out on July 13th, priced $3.99.

»

- Amie Cranswick

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Lego announces massive 4080-piece Disney Castle set

11 July 2016 10:38 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

If you’ve been looking for somewhere to store your Disney minifigures, then you’ll soon be in luck, as The Lego Group has announced the upcoming release of the massive Disney Castle set. Based on the iconic Cinderella castle and packed with subtle nods to the Disney cannon, the set consists of 4080 pieces, and includes five minifigures in Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck and Tinker Bell. Check out some promotional images here..

The Disney Castle set will retail for $350 and stands at over 29” high and 17” wide.

»

- Gary Collinson

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Emily S. Whitten: Awesome Con Round-Up & A Look Ahead

10 July 2016 2:33 PM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Con season has well and truly slid into gear now; with Awesome Con kicking things off a few weeks ago and Sdcc and NerdHQ fast approaching. Of course, con season is really year-round these days; but for me, it starts with Awesome Con and ends with New York Comic Con.

This year’s Awesome Con was, as usual, a great start to the season for me. What I like about the con is that despite only being four years old, it’s managed to integrate various fun aspects of different flavors of cons into a fairly seamless whole – meaning that if you aren’t there for one particular facet of the offerings, there are plenty of others to experience. Here were some of the highlights for me:

The media guests:

Awesome Con has consistently done well in getting big names to a young con. This year’s lineup included everyone »

- Emily S. Whitten

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Justin Timberlake to Receive Decade Award at 2016 Teen Choice Awards and We're Hoping He Brings Back One of These Epic Looks

6 July 2016 8:10 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Justin Timberlake has given fans 10 years of creative goodness. The singer, who first entered hearts as a young stud on Mickey Mouse Club and then as a teen heartthrob in 'N Sync, is going to be presented with The Decade Award at this year's Teen Choice Awards, airing July 31. J.T. will be recognized for his constant evolution as an artist over the last 10 years. "From his musical artistry to innovative collaborations," the press release states, "the singer continues to create relevant, chart-topping music, transcending generations of fans," adding that Timberlake has won a total 22 Teen Choice Awards, the most by any male ever. Ten years ago, Justin released his multi-Platinum »

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A question for Steven Spielberg: is there room for a second Indiana Jones?

23 June 2016 11:46 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Star Wars-style torch-passing won’t work for the adventurer – a successful reboot might require pitching young and old versions of Indy across multiple timelines

Among all the fuss over Disney’s $4.05bn purchase of Star Wars rights holder Lucasfilm in October 2012 – remember all those terrible shots of George Lucas fighting Mickey Mouse and Darth Pluto with lightsabers? – it was largely overlooked that the studio had also picked up the rights to a certain slightly beat-up, fedora-sporting archaeological adventurer. Now that Star Wars has been wrenched from the horrors of the dark side (otherwise known as the prequels) and placed back on the path to righteousness by Jj Abrams, the mouse house has begun turning its attention to that other famous Lucas-spawned franchise, you know: the one that barely put a foot wrong for nigh-on three decades before royally nuking the fridge with 2008’s misfiring Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. »

- Ben Child

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15 Most Beloved Disney/Pixar Animated Shorts, Ranked (Videos)

16 June 2016 4:44 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Both Disney and Pixar have left a mark on animation that few other studios can match, and for both of them, their origins can be traced to animated shorts. Pixar has accompanied all of its feature films with opening shorts, and Disney has recently followed the same model with shorts that range from groundbreaking experiments to revitalization of their most classic characters. “Runaway Brain” (1997) — A common complaint about Mickey Mouse is that in modern times he has become more of a corporate mascot than a cartoon character. The Disney shorts restore him to greatness, particularly this macabre tale »

- Jeremy Fuster

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Transformers: the great toy massacre of 1986

10 June 2016 6:27 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Thirty years ago, Transformers: The Movie traumatised a generation of kids with a string of startling deaths. Ryan looks back...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for Transformers: The Movie.

When parents took their kids to see Transformers: The Movie in 1986, they probably weren’t expecting quite as much death and mayhem. But in the feature-length spin-off from the hit Hasbro toy-line and accompanying TV show, the spectre of death was everywhere; one early scene alone saw the evil Decepticons hijack an Autobot space shuttle and execute all the heroes inside.

It’s worth bearing in mind, first of all, that the Transformers TV series, which had been running for two years by that point, had never killed off any of its characters - even though they often engaged in protracted brawls and laser battles. In Transformers: The Movie, a number of much-loved characters were not only shot and killed, but occasionally died in surprisingly graphic fashion.

On a personal note, I still recall seeing the film at the age of about nine, and being slightly stunned at the sight of Prowl - he was the one who could transform into a police car - being shot in the chest, causing a gout of fire and smoke to issue from his eyes and mouth. “Wow,” I thought. “This film isn’t messing around.” 

Other Transformers who met their demise in Transformers: The Movie included Brawn, Ironhide and his ambulance doppelganger Ratchet, Windcharger and Wheeljack. Even the Decepticons didn’t walk away unscathed; Megatron and two of his fellow villains were mortally wounded and magically changed into the new, more futuristic-looking Galvatron, Scourge and Cyclonus. The duplicitous Starscream, who’d planned to usurp Megatron for years, eventually got his comeuppance: he was repeatedly blasted until his body turned to ash.

It was fairly strong stuff for an animated movie at the time. But it was as nothing - nothing - compared to the shock of what happened to Optimus Prime. In the midst of a pitched battle which saw Autobots struck down left and right, Prime engaged in a brutal fight with Megatron. At first, it looked like the kind of confrontation we’d seen in the TV series a dozen times; lots of cool-sounding mottos (“One shall stand, one shall fall!”), punches and stray laser blasts. But as the fight wore on, there were odd signs that things were about to get nasty: Prime is stabbed in the abdominal area first with what appears to be a huge piece of shrapnel, and then a laser sword. But then something shocking happened: Megatron shot Prime repeatedly in the chest.

By the end of the fight, Megatron and Prime are both left in a crumpled heap on the floor. But Prime pulls through, right? Wrong. In a scene that no doubt left its mark on entire theatres full of wide-eyed kids, Prime died on an operating table, the Matrix of Leadership falling from his hands and his once vivid red paint fading to a sullen grey. 

From toy maker Hasbro’s standpoint, killing off all these characters came down to simple economics: Prime, Ratchet, Prowl and their compatriots were all part of the original 1984 Generation One line, and Hasbro wanted to replace them with shiny new toys like Kup, Blurr and Rodimus Prime. What better way to do it than in the Transformers’ big, expensive debut movie?

For kids who loved Optimus Prime, however, the Transformers robot massacre was akin to, say, Walt Disney shooting Mickey Mouse to death in the middle of Fantasia. In fact, Hasbro had completely failed to predict how kids - not to mention their exhausted parents - would react to Prime’s shock death. In a brief documentary on Transformers: The Movie’s 20th anniversary DVD, story consultant Flint Dille expresses his surprise at the level of grief the event provoked.

“We didn’t know that he was an icon,” Dille says, still seemingly baffled by the response. “It was a toy show. We just thought we were killing off the old product line to replace it with new products.” 

If Hasbro - and the film’s makers - thought kids would rush out of the cinema in search of the nearest toy shop, they were sorely mistaken.

“Kids were crying in the theatres,” Dille recalls. “We heard about people leaving the movie. We were getting a lot of nasty notes about it. There was some kid who locked himself in his bedroom for two weeks.”

There was, however, one person working on Transformers: The Movie who apparently tried to avert Prime’s death: screenwriter Ron Friedman. Already the writer of GI Joe and the Transformers TV episodes, he was given the task of writing the Transformers movie script. Realising that Prime was the heroic father figure in the Autobot family, he advised Hasbro against killing the character off.

“I recognised that I needed to assign family identities to characters in order to create the recognition factor that young people need," Friedman explained in a 2013 interview with Todd Matthy. “They cannot verbalise this; it’s beneath the surface. To remove Optimus Prime, to physically remove Daddy from the family, that wasn’t going to work. I told Hasbro and their lieutenants they would have to bring him back but they said no and had ‘great things planned.’ In other words they were going to create new more expensive toys.”

While some movie-goers reeled at Prime’s death, they should at least be grateful that Transformers: The Movie was rather less violent than initially planned. One sequence in the script describes new Autobot leader Ultra Magnus being torn apart by Galvatron’s flying henchmen, the Sweeps:

Galvatron

Sweeps, quarter him!

Angle On The Sweeps - Tracking

Four rope-like rays shoot out of them and...

On Ultra Magnus

wrap around his arms and legs.

Angle On Ultra Magnus And The Sweeps

His arms and legs caught by the four ropes, he knows he's just about had it.

He struggles for one last moment, then...

Angle On The Sweeps And Ultra Magnus

Pulling their rays taut, the Sweeps fly in four separate directions, effectively drawing and quartering the Autobot leader...

On Ultra Magnus

As all of his limbs are separated from his body and scattered in the distance, he Screams In Horror.

Ouch. The sequence remained in contention long enough to reach the storyboarding stage, and the Marvel comic book adaptation of Transformers: The Movie also saw Ultra Magnus meet the same undignified end. You can see how it might have looked in the following video:

Clearly realising that drawing and quartering a toy robot’s a bit much for a family film, the scene was changed so that Ultra Magnus is simply cornered and shot to death by ruthless Decepticons.

Younger viewers may also have been mildly traumatised for another scene that was planned but ultimately never created: a battle in which a group of Autobots, hopelessly outnumbered and out-gunned, charges directly into an army of Decepticons.

“[The scene] basically wiped out the entire 84 product line in one massive ‘charge of the light brigade’” Flint Dille recalls. “So, whoever wasn't discontinued, stumbled to the end. That scene didn't make it into the finished movie. But if you think kids were locking themselves in the bedroom over Optimus Prime, basically in that scene they would've seen their entire toy collection wiped out.”

As it was, the backlash against Prime’s death was so fierce that the creators of the movie and TV series eventually had to relent and bring the character back from the dead in early 1987. 

The great irony of Optimus Prime’s death - and the rest of the Transformers who were killed in the great massacre of 1986 - is that, while those deaths were a business decision, they resulted in a film that was something more than a glorified toy commercial. Transformers: The Movie wasn’t a particularly big success at the time, but it retains a cult following - and, of course, the death of the Autobot leader is still talked about today. Ron Friedman, who tried and failed to prevent Hasbro from killing the Autobots’ father figure, is even calling his memoir I Killed Optimus Prime.

After Transformers: The Movie, Optimus Prime was killed and brought back from the dead so many times in various TV shows, comic books and even Michael Bay’s live-action movies that listing them would take up an article in itself. For a generation of Transformers fans, though, it was that first death in 1986 that sticks in the mind. Prime and dozens of other robot compatriots may have died for business purposes, but their deaths provoked an emotional response that even Hasbro hadn’t predicted.

See related  The strange story of Jetfire, and other Transformers toys The unrealised potential of the Transformers movies Movies Feature Ryan Lambie Transformers 13 Jun 2016 - 06:29 Transformers: The Movie Optimus Prime death movies »

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70 years ago today: Mickey Mouse welcomed BBC back to the airwaves after World War II

7 June 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

70 years ago today, Mickey Mouse welcomed BBC back to the airwaves for the first time after World War II. The television service had been shut down for nearly seven years when broadcasting ceased during the war. The 1933 cartoon Mickey’s Gala Premier was the final program broadcast on BBC on September 1, 1939 before it went off the air, and it was the first program transmitted when BBC was back in 1946. The cartoon chronicles Hollywood celebrities joining Mickey and Minnie at Grumman’s Chinese Theatre for the premiere of a new Mickey Mouse movie. Other notable June 7 happenings in pop culture history:  • 1955: The game show The $64,000 Question premiered on CBS. It became one of the shows involved in the 1950s quiz show scandal. • 1963: The Rolling Stones’ first single, a cover of Chuck Berry’s “Come On,” was released. • 1969: The Johnny Cash Show premiered on ABC. • 1969: At the 22nd Primetime Emmy Awards, »

- Emily Rome

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Marc Alan Fishman: Secret Conversations About Steve Rogers

4 June 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Deep inside a bunker, equidistant from MSNBC, CNN, Fox News, and Univision, the remaining candidates vying for President of the United States secretly meet. Please note they do this every couple of days.

Lowly Pa: Sirs, Madam, I wanted to bring this item to you, as you may be handed some softball opinion questions in the next news cycle. That is if Donald hasn’t spouted off something racist that needs to be covered.

The Donald: Not this week, you loser.

Pa: Thank you, sir. May I have another sir? Anyways… So, Nick Spencer – a comic book writer – has penned a recent issue of Captain America wherein Steve Rogers has turned out have been brainwashed by Hydra for decades. This rewrites whole swatches of his origin, potentially. But I should note the story has only just –

The Donald: Weak! Pathetic! What a loser. I mean, look, are there some great yuge stories about Steve Rogers? »

- Marc Alan Fishman

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Zootopia Video Reveals The Hidden Mickeys All Over The Movie

3 June 2016 8:02 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Disney.s Zootopia made a major impact when it was released in March. And, as any good movie from a company with a lot of history behind it nowadays, there were a lot of references to another classic character in the film; I mean, everyone loves a good easter egg, right? Now there.s a video that shows off some of the hidden Mickey Mouse art in the movie. Take a look. This fun little video was posted on the Disney Movies Anywhere YouTube page in anticipation of Zootopia.s Blu-Ray and DVD release. After a brief intro that carefully reminds us how cute the movie was, we.re taken into what is almost surely a special feature on the Blu-Ray, a top secret Zpd forensic file called "Hidden Mickeys." The video then goes on to spotlight a few of the Mickey Mouse easter eggs that I doubt most people »

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Bernie Sanders v. Disney Round 2: ‘Bring Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck Back to America’

25 May 2016 10:27 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Bernie Sanders has gone head-to-head with Disney once again in what is turning into a battle between the Democrat Donkey and Mickey Mouse. After taking the global company to task over low wages for Disneyland employees on Tuesday, Sanders continued his attack at a rally in Lancaster, California, on Wednesday. “The guy who is the head of Disney makes $42 million a year. Company makes billions of dollars in profit, but they are paying workers there wages that are so low many of these workers can’t even find housing and have to stay in motels,” Sanders told supporters. Also Read: Disney's Bob Iger Blasts. »

- Debbie Emery

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Annette Funicello's Mickey Mouse Club Ears and $1 Million in Other Rare Disney Memorabilia to Sell at Auction - See the Items

23 May 2016 3:45 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Disneyland is gearing up for its 60th anniversary celebrations by auctioning off an estimated $1 million worth of rare and vintage memorabilia from the park's early days. From the first-ever Mickey Mouse wristwatch to Annette Funicello's bronzed Mickey Mouse Club ears, superfans from all over the world will bid to own a piece of Disney's beginnings at Collecting Disney, hosted by Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, California. One of the auction items literally outlines the beginning of the amusement park. Discovered by the widow of the man who helped build the Disneyland railroad, one of the first blueprints of »

- Michael Miller, @write_miller

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Annette Funicello's Mickey Mouse Club Ears and $1 Million in Other Rare Disney Memorabilia to Sell at Auction - See the Items

23 May 2016 3:45 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Disneyland is gearing up for its 60th anniversary celebrations by auctioning off an estimated $1 million worth of rare and vintage memorabilia from the park's early days. From the first-ever Mickey Mouse wristwatch to Annette Funicello's bronzed Mickey Mouse Club ears, superfans from all over the world will bid to own a piece of Disney's beginnings at Collecting Disney, hosted by Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, California. One of the auction items literally outlines the beginning of the amusement park. Discovered by the widow of the man who helped build the Disneyland railroad, one of the first blueprints of »

- Michael Miller, @write_miller

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Walt Disney-Owned Mickey Mouse Doll, Animator's Desk Up for Auction

23 May 2016 10:21 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Walt Disney's hand-signed Mickey Mouse doll and personal animator's desk are two highlights of a massive Disney auction expected to yield $2 million to $3 million. The "Collecting Disney" sale, scheduled for June 18th at Los Angeles' Van Eaton Galleries, will feature over 700 lots of memorabilia from the Disney archives, Reuters reports.

"This particular doll was given to woman that he drove an ambulance with in 1917 in World War One," said gallery owner Mike Van Eaton, who estimated the signed item to bring between $50,000 and $70,000. "A lifelong friend of his, [Disney] gave her »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

1-20 of 70 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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