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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 92 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Björk's "Danish Director" Statement

15 October 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

By Nathaniel R

Catherine Deneuve, Björk, and Von Trier at Cannes (2000)

The floodgates have opened post Weinstein and now everyone wants to speak out. This morning Björk issued a statement about her experience working with "a Danish director," a hilariously coy non-naming of names since she's only starred in one movie, Lars von Trier's Dancer in the Dark (2000) after which she never appeared in a movie again, unless you count her performance art collaboration with her then-boyfriend Matthew Barney on Drawing Restraint (2009). Which, well, the sexual violence was onscreen in that one with Barney and Björk carving each other up while naked underwater and turning into whales or some such. You know how that happens.

Here is her statement which is worth parsing due to its unexpected Dogville allusion »

- NATHANIEL R

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Fortress Of Solitude: Jeanne Dielman…

16 September 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Warning: The following piece was written without regard to the presence of “spoilers.”

We see the interior of a quiet apartment. It is lit with the waning diffuseness of a grey afternoon, and there is a woman moving about its hallways with a steadiness of purpose. The camera which affords us this look into her living space is fixated at an angle perpendicular to the front door, gazing at eye level down the main hallway toward a closed door. The woman greets the man who walks in the front door with indifferent familiarity, with silence. She takes his coat, hangs it on a hook somewhere beyond the purview of the frame, and they both continue quietly toward the far door, completing the introduction to an encounter they have engaged in many times before. The camera remains motionless as they close the door, and we never see what happens once it shuts. »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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The Midwife (Sage femme) Movie Review

8 September 2017 6:45 AM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

The Midwife (Sage femme) Director: Martin Provost Written by: Martin Provost Cast: Catherine Frot, Catherine Deneuve, Olivier Gourmet, Quentin Dolmaire, Mylène Demongeot Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 9/1/17 Opens: July 21 in theaters and October 17 on DVD. Some say that opposites attract; for example, good listeners and good talkers could easily match up. Others […]

The post The Midwife (Sage femme) Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Harvey Karten

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Belle de Jour review – Catherine Deneuve is extraordinary in a secret theatre of erotic shame

6 September 2017 9:09 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Luis Buñuel’s elegantly surreal film about a bored housewife and part-time sex worker offers a shrewd, scabrous commentary on social and gender relations

Luis Buñuel’s Belle de Jour is 50 years old and back in UK cinemas with all its creamy elegance and scabrous humour intact. With co-writer Jean-Claude Carrière, Buñuel creates a secret theatre of erotic shame. The only thing that really dates the film is a startling moment when someone reads aloud a newspaper headline about Aberfan. It’s the one moment in Buñuel’s career when his surrealism was unintentional.

This is the story of Séverine, played by Catherine Deneuve, the beautiful, bored young wife of a wealthy Parisian surgeon, who submits to her conjugal duties rarely and unwillingly, but becomes a high-class prostitute during the day, answering only to the name Belle de Jour and experiencing a secret erotic martyrdom, all deeply bound up with »

- Peter Bradshaw

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New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

6 September 2017 7:42 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As words like film, negative, celluloid, unspool, and reel become increasingly archaic, even the venerable Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences realizes that it needs to evolve. At the Telluride Film Festival, I sat down with new Academy president John Bailey to discuss what he has in mind. Here’s what we can expect from the 75-year-old cinematographer of “The Big Chill” and “Groundhog Day,” who is proud to be the rare filmmaker representing the Academy board.

(Re)Define the motion picture

Bailey is a realist as much as a cineaste. At Telluride, he appreciated Paul Schrader’s well-reviewed “First Reformed” — but fully supported the possibility that the film would go to Netflix. “It’s very unlikely the studios would pick it up,” said Bailey. “In reality, Netflix and Amazon have now become the studios that have the courage to make the film nobody else would make.”

Similarly, while »

- Anne Thompson

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New Academy President John Bailey is Willing to Ask if Movies Need Theaters For Oscar Qualification, and Other Radical Ideas

6 September 2017 7:42 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As words like film, negative, celluloid, unspool, and reel become increasingly archaic, even the venerable Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences realizes that it needs to evolve. At the Telluride Film Festival, I sat down with new Academy president John Bailey to discuss what he has in mind. Here’s what we can expect from the 75-year-old cinematographer of “The Big Chill” and “Groundhog Day,” who is proud to be the rare filmmaker representing the Academy board.

(Re)Define the motion picture

Bailey is a realist as much as a cineaste. At Telluride, he appreciated Paul Schrader’s well-reviewed “First Reformed” — but fully supported the possibility that the film would go to Netflix. “It’s very unlikely the studios would pick it up,” said Bailey. “In reality, Netflix and Amazon have now become the studios that have the courage to make the film nobody else would make.”

Similarly, while »

- Anne Thompson

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The Intersex Objects of Bertrand Mandico

28 August 2017 12:44 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Mubi's retrospective Bertrand Mandico's Cinema is showing July 26 - October 7, 2017 in many countries around the world.The cinema of French filmmaker and animator Bertrand Mandico is unique in its approach to depicting the human body. For Mandico, the body’s status as a film subject is comparable to and interchangeable with that of any other film subject. That is, ‘animate objects’—such as human characters or animals—occupy the same cinematic roles as ‘inanimate’ ones—such as housewares or artificial structures, collapsing the binary that exists between the two. Mandico’s films time and again blur the line between binaries—animate and inanimate, male and female—and in doing so demonstrate their arbitrary nature as film subjects.  Bodies and objects in Mandico’s cinema often appear abstracted and juxtaposed vis-a-vis each other, such as when women portray lamps and men portray statues in Our Lady of Hormones (2014). At first glance, »

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Steven Soderbergh: 'Film-making is like sex. If I accidentally give someone else pleasure, that's fine'

23 August 2017 8:42 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The indie kingpin said he was quitting directing for oil painting. But he’s making more films than ever. He talks about his new heist caper Logan Lucky, starring Daniel Craig as a redneck – and his plan to topple the studio system

Steven Soderbergh is showing me a collage he’s been making. Half-finished, it sits on a table in his New York office. Composed entirely of movie stars in character, the work gives pride of place to Robert De Niro as a mohawked Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver. He’s flanked by River Phoenix, John Belushi, Sacha Baron Cohen, Dennis Hopper and Catherine Deneuve. Further afield we have Jack Nicholson, Keanu Reeves and Sharon Stone.

Soderbergh started making collages a few years ago: bored with his library of film books, he simply started cutting them up. “It’s problem-solving,” he says. “You pull an image out. You start looking around. »

- Tom Shone

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Melville at 100: Playing through August 13 at Grauman’s Egyptian in L.A.

6 August 2017 5:21 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Born 1917, as Jean-Pierre Grumbach, son of Alsatian Jews, Jean-Pierre adopted the name Melville as his nom de guerre in 1940 when France fell to the German Nazis and he joined the French Resistance. He kept it as his stage name when he returned to France and began making films.

Melville at 100 at the American Cinematheque in Hollywood is showcasing eight of his films made from 1949 to to 1972 to honor the 100th year since his birth.

Americn Cinemtheque’s historic Egyptian Theater in Hollywood

The American Cinematheque has grown tremendously sophisticated since its early days creating the 1960 dream of “The Two Garys” (for those who remember). Still staffed by stalwarts Barbara Smith, Gwen Deglise, Margot Gerber and Tom Harris, and with a Board of Directors of Hollywood heavy hitters, it has also been renovated by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association which has spent more than $500,000 restoring its infrastructure and repainting its famous murals. »

- Sydney Levine

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‘Wind River’ Scores at Specialty Box Office as ‘Step’ Gains a Foothold

6 August 2017 9:56 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

During a competitive period when well-reviewed wide releases like “Dunkirk” and “Baby Driver” are luring adult audiences away from new smart-house fare, Weinstein stormed back at the specialty box office with Taylor Sheridan’s Wyoming western “Wind River,” which boasted one of the best limited openings of the year. A strong debut will help it stand out in the weeks ahead as the flow of new films declines.

Fox Searchlight welcomed a decent initial response for its heart-tugging inner-city dance documentary “Step” in seven cities. Also impressive is the two-theater launch for “Columbus,” starring Jon Cho as a Korean translator spending time in middle America due to a family emergency.

Opening

Wind River (Weinstein) – Metacritic: 73; Festivals include: Sundance, Cannes, Seattle 2017

$164,187 in 4 theaters; PTA (per screen average): $41,042

Taylor Sheridan’s well-received rural thriller debuted with the strongest limited debut since late June’s “The Big Sick” and “The Beguiled.” Since »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Why Jeanne Moreau’s Death Represents the Decline of French Film in America

4 August 2017 1:47 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Iconic actress Jeanne Moreau’s death this week at 89 received muted American coverage, with remembrances that hardly captured Moreau’s essential presence and influence in world cinema. Overshadowed by the passing of Sam Shepard the day before (more contemporary, American, prominent in multiple fields, and younger), she received back-page obituaries in major papers. Her lack of any Oscar nominations, or a deserved honorary award, didn’t help the cause.

Even more unfortunate is the treatment of her death reflects American audiences’ ever-increasing disinterest in French-language film. Jeanne Moreau is significant for her transcendent artistry and the directors with whom she worked, but she also represented the iconic qualities of her country’s cinema.

Though the boom in “art houses” (a term popularized in the late 1940s) came more from Italian films (“Rome, Open City,” “Shoe Shine,” and particularly “Bicycle Thief”), French film became a steady part of the subtitled market by the mid-1950s. »

- Tom Brueggemann

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‘Detroit’ Tops Limited Openers, Along With ‘Inconvenient Sequel’ and ‘Menashe’

30 July 2017 9:43 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s a strong group of limited releases for a July weekend: Kathryn Bigelow’s “Detroit,” “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power,” and the Yiddish-language “Menashe” all performed well, as did Sony Pictures Classics’ “Bigsby Bear.”

Opening

Detroit (Annapurna) – Metacritic: 86

$365,455 in 20 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $18,273

Kathryn Bigelow’s first film since “Zero Dark Thirty” is the first released by Megan Ellison’s production company through its own distributor. With reviews nearly as strong as “Zero” and “The Hurt Locker” but shifting to the home front in this recounting of the Detroit riots exactly 50 years ago, this opened in 10 markets ahead of its wide release this Friday. This is a tough subject, however well received, and Annapurna and its team has a challenge opening this outside of the festival/awards season and finding a wide swath of African-American and other upscale audiences.

Read More‘Detroit’ Review: Kathryn Bigelow’s »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Trailer For Luis Bunuel’s Newly Restored Classic ‘Belle De Jour’ Starring Catherine Deneuve

28 July 2017 7:52 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The repressed, sexual desires of a bored housewife have never been more charged than in Luis Bunuel’s groundbreaking “Belle De Jour.” The erotic drama still sizzles decades later, and now it’s returning to the big screen in a new restoration, and looking better than ever.

Catherine Deneuve takes the starring role in the film that follows Séverine Serizy, who finds an outlet for her fleshly desires, even as she remains unable to love her own husband.

Continue reading Trailer For Luis Bunuel’s Newly Restored Classic ‘Belle De Jour’ Starring Catherine Deneuve at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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The Midwife – Review

28 July 2017 6:11 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

(l-r) Catherine Deneuve as Béatrice Sobolevski and Catherine Frot as Claire Breton in The Midwife. Photo by Michaâl Crotto. Courtesy of Music Box Films ©

Two great Catherines – Deneuve and Frot – star in The Midwife, a thoughtful French-language tale of family, childhood memories, and changing life in modern France. As the title suggests, one of the central characters is a midwife, but the film is not about midwifery. Still the film uses the profession’s long and honorable history bringing the next generation into this world as a metaphor a changing French world. It is also telling that the French term for midwife, sage femme, also means “wise woman.”

The film is moving, touching, bittersweet and funny by turns, and an excellent exploration of relationship between women of differing generations. The midwife in the film, Claire (Catherine Frot), is a really good one, the best at the little childbirth clinic near Paris where she works. »

- Cate Marquis

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Women-Directed Films Account For Less Than 5 Percent of Venice’s Competition Lineup

27 July 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“Angels Wear White”: 22 Hours Films

“Venice is recognized as the oldest film festival in the world, but the 73rd iteration of the fest demonstrates that they are lagging behind when it comes to gender equality in their programming,” we wrote last year. Sadly nothing has changed since. Despite increasing awareness of the film industry’s woman problem, Venice’s slate remains overwhelmingly male. The fest has announced the first batch of films for its 2017 lineup, and of 21 movies screening in Competition, only one is helmed by a woman, amounting to just under five percent of the fest’s most prominent program. This is actually worse than last year, when ten percent of the Competition was women-directed.

The sole film helmed by a woman that will be competing for the Golden Lion (Best Film) and eligible for the Silver Lion (Best Director) is Vivian Qu’s “Angels Wear White,” a story about two schoolgirls who are assaulted by a man in a hotel, and the teen girl working at reception who witnesses the crime.

Women fare considerably better in Venice’s Horizons Competition, where five of 19 films are female-helmed, which amounts to 26 percent of the slate. This portion of the fest is known for highlighting cutting-edge works. Among the films screening in this section are Anne Fontaine’s Isabelle Huppert-starrer “Marvin” and Nancy Buirski’s “The Rape of Recy Taylor,” a documentary about a 24-year-old black woman who was gang-raped by seven white men in Alabama in 1944.

“20th Century Women” star Annette Bening will serve as President of the fest’s jury this year. The four-time Oscar nominee will be the fest’s first female prez since French actress Catherine Deneuve held the role in 2006 — over 10 years ago.

The Venice Film Festival takes place August 30 to September 9. Check out all of the women-directed films announced so far below. List adapted from The Hollywood Reporter.

Competition: 1/21 films directed or co-directed by women

Angels Wear White, Vivian Qu

Out Of Competition Features: 2/14 films directed or co-directed by women

Il Signor Rotpeter, Antonietta de Lillo

Zama, Lucrecia Martel

Out Of Competition Documentaries: 0/8 films directed or co-directed by women

Special Events 0/3 films directed or co-directed by women

Horizons Competition: 5/ 19 films directed or co-directed by women

The Rape of Recy Taylor, Nancy Buirski

Caniba, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel

Les Bienheureux, Sofia Djama

Marvin, Anne Fontaine

Nico, 1988, Susanna Nicchiarelli

La Vita in Comune, Edoardo Winspeare

Cinema Nel Giardino: 2/6 films directed or co-directed by women

Controfigura, Ra di Martino

Woodshock, Kate Mulleavy, Laura Mulleavy

Venice Classics Documentary Competiton: 2/7 films directed or co-directed by women

La Lucida Follia di Marco Ferreri, Selma Jean Dell’Olio

The Prince and the Dybbuk, Elwira Niewiera

Special Documentary Screenings: 1/3 films films directed or co-directed by women

Lievito Madre, Le Ragazze del Secolo Scorso, Concita de Gregorio, Esmeralda Calabria

Women-Directed Films Account For Less Than 5 Percent of Venice’s Competition Lineup was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Amazon’s ‘Landline’ Leads Specialized Releases, Followed by Indian Rom-Com ‘Fidaa’

23 July 2017 11:20 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As “The Big Sick” crosses over to 2,500 theaters and “Dunkirk” takes up all the oxygen as the best-reviewed film of the year, this is a quiet moment for specialized releases. Here’s where they stand.

Read More‘Landline’ First Trailer: Gillian Robespierre and Jenny Slate Reunite For A Must-See Summer Indie

Opening

Landline (Magnolia) Metacritic: 65; Festivals include: Sundance, San Francisco, Seattle 2017

$52,336 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $13,084

Amazon brought Magnolia on board to handle theatrical on this Sundance acquisition, a complicated family drama about adult kids dealing with parental infidelity and sibling dynamics, with an eclectic cast including Edie Falco, John Turturro, and Jenny Slate. Opening in four top New York/Los Angeles theaters, this scored the best numbers for the weekend but otherwise not especially impressive. Saturday grosses fell slightly from Friday (in-person appearances were a likely factor).

What comes next: Magnolia adds 35 new dates this Friday »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Jenny Slate Dials Up ‘Landline’; Music Box Calls ‘The Midwife’ – Specialty B.O. Preview

21 July 2017 7:37 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Amazon Studios/Magnolia Pictures' Landline with Jenny Slate, Edie Falco and John Turturro is one of the Specialty titles going out this weekend against big tickets like Dunkirk and Girls Trip. Music Box Films' The Midwife starring Catherine Deneuve opens stateside following a successful run in France, and Oscilloscope's documentary Santoalla, about a strange disappearance in rural Spain, and Shudder thriller Kuso, the directorial debut of DJ, producer and rapper Flying… »

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‘The Midwife’ Successfully Unites Two Grand Dames of French Cinema [Review]

20 July 2017 1:44 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

This gentle drama about life’s beginnings and its end features two lead performances that are anything but quiet. “The Midwife” marks the first time that two grand dames of French cinema – Catherine Deneuve and Catherine Frot – appear together, and the pairing doesn’t disappoint. Little happens in the way of plot, but these performances and the script from director Martin Provost let these characters breathe and bloom in a way that feels special.

Continue reading ‘The Midwife’ Successfully Unites Two Grand Dames of French Cinema [Review] at The Playlist. »

- Kimber Myers

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Joshua Reviews Martin Provost’s The Midwife [Theatrical Review]

20 July 2017 12:38 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

What makes a truly great film? Is it a superlative stylist behind the camera? Maybe a top shelf screenplay? Or is it the skill with which the performers in front of the camera invite the viewer into the narrative? Well, when dealing with the likes of Catherine Deneuve, it’s hard for a viewer to find anything other than utter captivation in each and every line reading, no matter the source material.

Just take a look at the iconic French actress’ latest film, The Midwife. From writer/director Martin Provost, The Midwife finds Deneuve taking a supporting role in the story of Claire (Catherine Frot), a midwife and single mother on the verge of a truly life changing moment. As her son makes his way through college, Claire is facing a changing job landscape at her birthing clinic and the large hospital looking to steal her away as well as »

- Joshua Brunsting

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‘The Midwife’ Review: Catherine Deneuve Shines in Otherwise Murky Weepie

19 July 2017 5:27 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

French writer-director Martin Provost’s “The Midwife” is a story about two very different women: Claire (Catherine Frot), a tense and responsible person who delivers babies at a small hospital, and Béatrice (Catherine Deneuve), a free-spirited and highly irresponsible gambler who lives by her wits. Their exact relationship to each other is difficult to understand, and that’s only one of the problems with this movie. “The Midwife” begins with some plodding and un-promising scenes at the hospital with Claire, but the film is briefly energized when Deneuve’s Béatrice comes crashing back into Claire’s life. (Béatrice had some kind of relationship with. »

- Dan Callahan

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1-20 of 92 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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