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1-20 of 28 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Magic of Jacques Demy

20 March 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Taking a look at the French director’s fascinating filmography.

One of the biggest films of 2016, La La Land, owes a thing or two to French director Jacques Demy. The bright, colorful musical visually mirrors Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), and director Damien Chazelle was able to capture something of the melancholic sweetness of Demy’s musicals. Demy is not one of the most famous French directors, however his films have a specific charm and intelligence that no other filmmaker could match. The way he blended Hollywood style with French culture was unlike any other filmmaker at the time.

Demy began his career in 1960s France, during the time of the “Nouvelle Vague” or French New Wave. This was the time of films such as Breathless, Jules and Jim, The 400 Blows, and Le Beau Serge. However, Demy lies a little bit outside of this group of filmmakers, and »

- Angela Morrison

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François Ozon on Frantz, Sex and Death, and Hitchcock’s Rebecca

20 March 2017 12:05 AM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

“Awards are like hemorrhoids. Sooner or later every asshole gets one,” François Ozon, one of France's most prolific director/screenwriters, has noted.

With Frantz, his pacifistic, feminist, and slightly homoerotic chronicling of a post-World War I love affair of sorts opening Stateside this week, he can say that with a smile. After all, this feature has already garnered eleven Cécar nominations, including one for best film, and a dozen more from various international film festivals.

For many folks, that’s no surprise. All they have to hear is that a new Ozon is unspooling at their local art house, and they’re hotfooting it to the ticket booth. Why? Few other directors have the ability to depict the psychosexual permutations of our fellow man better, at times accompanied with an unexpected Hitchcockian twist or a good dose of Almodóvarian tongue-in-cheek perversity.

In his 1996 short, "A Summer Dress," a young gay man, »

- Brandon Judell

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"Les hautes solitudes": A Film at Wit’s End

22 February 2017 7:34 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Jean Seberg in Les hautes solitudes. Courtesy of The Film Desk.It is a raw experience. No title, no credits of any sort. No soundtrack—although I defy anyone to watch it in absolute silence and not “hear” something, at some point, in their head. Just a series of “moving images” (for once the currently fashionable artworld term is correct), portraits in black-and-white, mostly trained on faces, or the upper parts of several bodies. There is no make-up, only minimal lighting and staging, and no post-production effects or clean-up whatsoever. The on-screen participants include Nico, Tina Aumont, Laurent Terzieff. And, most extensively, Jean Seberg—which may come as a shock to viewers not entirely au fait with the biography of the film’s director, Philippe Garrel. “Garrel’s camera sees Seberg honestly,” wrote David Ehrenstein in his book Film: The Front Line 1984, “as if discovering her for the first time, »

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Berlinale 2017: The Midwife Review

16 February 2017 9:51 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

We’re all rather fond of routine, and you get to a certain age in life when you’ve settled on your friends, you don’t really need any more. We can fear the return of that old companion, somebody from a former life, somebody you feel there’s a reason you lost contact with. It’s this notion that Martin Provost’s The Midwife thrives on, and while we feel the anxiety and impatience of our protagonist in this endeavour when her life is disrupted – the overriding sentiment to take away is that change is not always such a bad thing after all.

Catherine Frot plays the aforementioned role, the experienced, compassionate midwife Claire Breton, who returns home from a nightshift to a voicemail – from Béatrice Sobolevski (Catherine Deneuve), an old friend of Claire’s, who eventually went to have a relationship with her father, a successful Olympic swimmer. »

- Stefan Pape

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‘La La Land’ Refurbished the Classic Musical Format for a Modern Audience

16 February 2017 9:45 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

La La Land” is deceptively innovative. It evokes classic musicals while pushing the genre forward; it’s old-fashioned and modern at the same time.

Damien Chazelle makes his bold intent clear from the outset: Drivers stuck on a jam-packed freeway ramp exit their cars to sing and dance in a dazzling pyrotechnic display. When the music stops, they get into their cars and the movie’s star-crossed lovers-to-be lock eyes for the first time. They don’t swoon; Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) flips the bird at distracted Mia (Emma Stone) before speeding away.

The traffic and her Prius are thoroughly modern; so, too, his reaction. The fact that she’s clearly an actress preparing for an audition suggests we could soon be heading into familiar territory, however.

Sure enough, visual allusions to classic musicals soon pop up on-screen. Mia and her actress wannabes sport candy-colored dresses similar to the ones Catherine Deneuve »

- Diane Garrett

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‘The Midwife’ Review: Catherine Deneuve Gives Her Best Role in Years in Minor-Key Crowdpleaser — Berlinale 2017

15 February 2017 1:08 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

As Goldie Hawn once put it, Hollywood has only three roles for women: Ingénue, District Attorney and “Driving Miss Daisy”. The fact of the matter is, too many strong talents see the pool of good parts unfairly dry up once they reach middle age, and short of radically reshaping the American film industry (I’m for that, too!), might I suggest this temporary stop-gap – might they consider learning French?

While it doesn’t reach the heady highs of last year’s festival hit “Things To Come,” Martin Provost’s “The Midwife” once again proves that French filmmakers know how to treat actresses of a certain age. Offering plum roles to Catherines Frot and Catherine Deneuve, “The Midwife” is a minor-key crowd pleaser about friendship, forgiveness and rolling with the punches.

Single mother Claire (Catherine Frot) lives a lonely, vampiric existence in the suburbs of Paris.  She sleeps days and works nights, »

- Ben Croll

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Berlin Film Review: ‘Last Days in Havana’

14 February 2017 2:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

With Fidel Castro gone and trade embargoes relaxed, any present-day vision of Cuba feels like an ephemeral one, a time-marking snapshot of a country in unpredictable transition. That’s one reason to value veteran Cuban filmmaker Fernando Pérez’s “Last Days in Havana,” a cross-generational portrait of the crumbling capital’s hard-up dreamers that serves of a kind of conflicted valentine to the city itself, gazing upon its weathered walls and worn faces in authentic, unaffected detail. As drama, however, Pérez’s film is rather less rewarding, knotting together thin narrative strands that are either predictably resolved or never work up many questions to begin with. More organic but less vibrant than such recent evocations of the same milieu as “Viva” and “The King of Havana,” Pérez’s film may be limited to a respectful festival run following its international premiere in the Berlinale Special sidebar.

To be fair, if »

- Guy Lodge

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Berlin Film Review: ‘The Midwife’

14 February 2017 1:35 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It takes a certain inverted chutzpah to make a drama about someone who’s a real fuddy-duddy. A French fuddy-duddy (not that there’s anything wrong with that). Claire (Catherine Frot), the title character of “The Midwife,” is a strenuously decent person, and that’s part of her fuddy-duddyness. She’s the most experienced and devoted midwife at a struggling maternity clinic in Paris. We watch her deliver several babies during the film’s opening minutes, and it’s obvious that she’s wonderful at her job, and that it leaves her sleep-deprived and emotionally drained because it’s a calling, a mission that occupies the center of her existence. Maybe that’s because nothing else does.

Claire, who’s got an adult son in medical school (though he’s about to flake out of it), has always been a single mom. The clinic she works at is getting ready to close down, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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‘The Midwife’ (‘Sage femme’): Film Review | Berlin 2017

14 February 2017 1:30 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The French-language title of director Martin Provost’s latest femme-centric drama is Sage femme, a term that technically means midwife, as in the medical profession, but also literally describes a “well-behaved woman.” The double meaning is particularly apt when applied to the film’s heroine, Claire—a single mom in her fifties whose spick-and-span life is thrown amuck by the arrival of Beatrice, a woman who is Claire’s polar opposite in every way, but who could possibly change her for the better.

Claire is played by Catherine Frot and Beatrice by Catherine Deneuve, and The Midwife could also be titled “Catherine vs. Catherine,” »

- Jordan Mintzer

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Berlinale: Catherine Deneuve Talks About Her Free-Spirited ‘Midwife’ Role

14 February 2017 10:47 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

French actresses Catherine Deneuve and Catherine Frot discussed their first-ever meeting on the big screen at the Berlin Film Festival on Tuesday following screening of their out of competition entry “The Midwife,” by writer-director Martin Provost.

The film focuses on Claire (Frot), a middle-aged midwife who after many years is reacquainted with Béatrice (Deneuve), the one-time mistress of her late father, who is seeking her help.

“We didn’t know each other very well,” Deneuve said at a press conference. “We had never had the chance to meet each other before.” The actress said it was actually better for the film that they had never met before because there was no sense of intimacy between the two women. “It works well for the film.”

Comparing herself to her character, a loud, colorful and egocentric glamourpuss with an extremely free-spirited approach to life, Deneuve said she was nothing like Béatrice, though she really liked the part. »

- Ed Meza

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Berlinale: UniFrance, German Films Join Forces with Les Arcs Festival, Neue Visionen’s Torsten Frehse Receives French Cinema Award

14 February 2017 8:21 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Berlin– Film promotion orgs UniFrance and German Films are set to host the next Franco-German Film Meetings during the 9th edition of Les Arcs European Film Festival.

Scheduled to run Dec. 18-20 in the French Alps-set festival, the two-day conference will include lectures, debates, conferences and case studies. As part of the partnership, a selection of Franco-German projects will be pitched at the festival’s co-production village, its industry sidebar.

The festival will also host a special section dedicated to German cinema which will include 12 recent German pics.

Les Arcs expects approximately 600 European professionals to turn up at the event.

The Franco-German Film Meetings were founded in 2003 by the Franco-German Film Academy in order to fast track co-productions between the two countries and encourage the distribution of German films in France and reversely.

While in Berlin, UniFrance paid tribute to Torsten Frehse, the founder of leading German distribution company Neue Visionen, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Berlinale: Film Factory Nabs ‘Giant’ From ‘Flowers’ Creative Team, Producers (Exclusive)

14 February 2017 5:40 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Film Factory Entertainment has picked up worldwide sales rights outside Spain to Jon Garaño and Aitor Arregi’s true events-inspired Basque period drama “Aundiya” (“Giant”).

The new film re-teams as directors two of the three top creative talents behind 2014 Basque hit movie “Loreak” (“Flowers”), which was Spain’s foreign-language entry for the 88th Academy Awards.

“Giant” is also produced by “Loreak’s” Irusoin and Moriarti Produkzioak, this time in partnership with Koldo Zuazua’s Kowalski Films (“Wounded”).

Adolfo Blanco’s Contracorriente will release the film in Spain by 2017’s third quarter.

Vicente CanalesFilm Factory is presenting the project and showing the first promo to international buyers at the European Film Market.

With Eneko Sagardoy (“The Night Watchman”), Joseba Usabiaga (“Picadero”) and Iñigo Aramburu (“The Invisible Guardian”), “Aundiya” is set in the mid-nineteenth century portraying the tough life of a Northern Spain’s traveling freak show.

When Martin (Usabiaga) returns home from the war, »

- Emiliano De Pablos

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Berlinale: Polish Party at the Academie Lounge (Photo Gallery)

14 February 2017 4:09 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Agnieszka Holland, the director of Berlinale competition film “Spoor,” attended the Polish Party at the Academie Lounge in Berlin on Friday, accompanied by the film’s stars Agnieszka Mandat (right) and Jakub Gierszal.

They were joined by Borys Szyc, another actor from “Spoor,” and Olga Tokarczuk, who penned the film’s script, adapting from her novel, “Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead.”

Other guests at the event, hosted by Magdalena Sroka, director of the Polish Film Institute, included Krzysztof Zanussi, film director, producer, and head of Tor Studio, actress Zofia Wichlacz (“Afterimage”), who was selected as a Shooting Star this year, and Sebastian Lach, an actor from “Erlprince,” which plays in the Berlinale’s Generation section.

Magdalena Sroka, Agnieszka Holland (Photo: Courtesy of Polish Film Institute)

Zofia Wichlacz (Photo: Courtesy of Polish Film Institute)

Marion Doering (Photo: Courtesy of Polish Film Institute)

Krzysztof Zanussi (Photo: Courtesy of Polish Film Institute)

Jakub Gierszal, »

- Leo Barraclough

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The Oscar Race for Best Actress is Down To Emma Stone vs. Isabelle Huppert

3 February 2017 10:39 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In one of the most competitive races for a Best Actress nomination in years, two stars of Best Picture contenders didn’t make it — five-time nominee Amy Adams (“Arrival”) and Taraji P. Henson (“Hidden Figures”) — along with veteran Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”), who will have to wait for her fifth nomination.

See more 2017 Oscar Predictions

So which of the top five final contenders will win the Oscar? I rank them in order of likelihood:

Emma Stone, the “Birdman” nominee and Oscar frontrunner, came out of Venice (winning Best Actress), Telluride, and Toronto with raves for her role as an enchanting singer-dancer-actress in Damien Chazelle’s Tiff audience-winner “La La Land.” She went on to land Critics Choice, SAG, and BAFTA nominations, and took home Golden Globe and SAG Awards. The Oscar is hers to lose.

See this Telluride video of her and writer-director Damien Chazelle at the start of her awards journey. »

- Anne Thompson

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The Oscar Race for Best Actress is Down To Emma Stone vs. Isabelle Huppert

3 February 2017 10:39 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In one of the most competitive races for a Best Actress nomination in years, two stars of Best Picture contenders didn’t make it — five-time nominee Amy Adams (“Arrival”) and Taraji P. Henson (“Hidden Figures”) — along with veteran Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”), who will have to wait for her fifth nomination.

See more 2017 Oscar Predictions

So which of the top five final contenders will win the Oscar? I rank them in order of likelihood:

Emma Stone, the “Birdman” nominee and Oscar frontrunner, came out of Venice (winning Best Actress), Telluride, and Toronto with raves for her role as an enchanting singer-dancer-actress in Damien Chazelle’s Tiff audience-winner “La La Land.” She went on to land Critics Choice, SAG, and BAFTA nominations, and took home Golden Globe and SAG Awards. The Oscar is hers to lose.

See this Telluride video of her and writer-director Damien Chazelle at the start of her awards journey. »

- Anne Thompson

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Could This Movie Be the Inspiration Behind La La Land's Ending?

30 January 2017 10:45 AM, PST | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

"No movie has ever hit me more. I remember seeing it for the first time as a kid and going from annoyed - 'Are they really going to do this much singing?' - to utterly overwhelmed by the end. It was the combination of fantasy and realism that got me." Speaking to The Hollywood Reporter, La La Land director Damien Chazelle described his reaction to Jacques Demy's 1964 romantic musical The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (Les Parapluies de Cherbourg). The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and La La Land use jazz music, saturated colors, and the eschewing of a neat, happy ending to bring to life a rich and realist presentation of young love. The quote resonated with me, as I've seen The Umbrellas of Cherbourg at least a dozen times and can remember the emotional impact of the first time I saw it as a teenager. The film is a colorful »

- Annie Gabillet

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FranceTV Distribution Launches International Sales Division for Feature Films

23 January 2017 7:44 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In the runup to the Berlin Film Festival, FranceTV Distribution, the commercial arm of French public broadcaster France Televisions, is launching an international sales division dedicated to feature-length films.

The new division will kick off with Jean Becker’s “The Red Collar,” a drama based on Jean-Christophe Rufin’s popular novel. The film, which begins shooting in June, will star Francois Cluzet (“Intouchables”) and Nicolas Duvauchelle (“Braquo”). La Belle Company will release the film in France in 2018.

Becker, whose recent directorial credits include “My Afternoons with Margueritte” and “Love Me No More,” is producing “The Red Collar” with Claire Maillard at ICE3. “The Red Collar” has been pre-bought by France 3.

“The presence of FranceTV Distribution on the international film market underscores its expertise in terms of movie promotion and we are proud to start with ‘The Red Collar.’ It’s just the beginning of a new and exciting adventure for FranceTV Distribution, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Berlinale Adds New Films Starring Catherine Deneuve, Geoffrey Rush

20 January 2017 6:57 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

New films from Stanley Tucci, Martin Provost and China’s Liu Jian complete the Berlinale’s competition lineup and will see their world premieres at the next month’s festival.

Only Liu’s film, the animated “Have a Nice Day,” will actually compete for the Golden Bear. “Final Portrait”, Tucci’s biopic of Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti with actor Geoffrey Rush, and “Midwife,” starring Catherine Frot and Catherine Deneuve, are part of the official competition section but will not actually vie for the main awards.

In all, the competition lineup features 24 films, all but two of which will have their world premieres at the festival and 18 of which will compete for the prestigious Golden and Silver Bears.

The festival also announced the Berlinale Special, which will once again present a selection of television series as part of the official program. It marks the third time TV programming has featured at Berlin, »

- Robert Mitchell

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Berlin sets competition, adds Amazon and BBC drama premieres

20 January 2017 5:32 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the festival in Out Of Competition berths are Stanley Tucci-directed Final Portrait and Catherine Deneuve drama Sage Femme.

James Gray’s The Lost City Of Z will have its interntional premiere while documentary The Trial: The State of Russia vs Oleg Sentsov will have its world premiere.

Among TV world premieres are Amazon’s Patriot and BBC One’s SS-gb.

In total, 18 of the 24 films selected for Competitionwill be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Berlin finalises competition, adds TV premieres

20 January 2017 5:32 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the competition are

18 of the 24 films selected for Competition will be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

The Berlinale Special will present recent works by contemporary filmmakers, documentaries, and extraordinary formats, as well as brand new series from around the world.

Berlinale Special Galas will be held at the Friedrichstadt-Palast and Zoo Palast. Other Special premieres will take place at the Kino International. Moderated discussions will follow the screenings at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year. Audiences »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999

1-20 of 28 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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