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8 items from 2004


Film godfather Brando dies of lung failure

3 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Marlon Brando, an acting icon whose Method style and brooding manner revolutionized film acting in the 1950s, has died. He was 80. Brando, who galvanized both audiences and critics with his breakthrough performances in 1951's A Streetcar Named Desire and 1954's On the Waterfront and later experienced a midlife career revival as the Mafia patriarch Don Vito Corleone in 1972's The Godfather, died of lung failure Thursday night at UCLA Medical Center, according to Roxanne Moster, a spokeswoman for the hospital. For all the plaudits he earned -- including two Oscars and eight Academy Award nominations -- the actor's life and late career were a tempest of personal turmoil and, in the eyes of many, a disappointing squandering of talent. Still, in his late 40s he more than redeemed himself with two of his most mesmerizing portrayals: His performance as Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather, for which he won his second Oscar, represented, among other things, a passing of the generational torch with Brando sharing scenes with such actors as Al Pacino, Robert Duvall and James Caan. »

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Film godfather Marlon Brando dies

3 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Marlon Brando, an acting icon whose Method style and brooding manner revolutionized film acting in the 1950s, has died. He was 80. Brando, who galvanized both audiences and critics with his breakthrough performances in 1951's A Streetcar Named Desire and 1954's On the Waterfront and later experienced a midlife career revival as the Mafia patriarch Don Vito Corleone in 1972's The Godfather, died of lung failure Thursday night at UCLA Medical Center, according to Roxanne Moster, a spokeswoman for the hospital. For all the plaudits he earned -- including two Oscars and eight Academy Award nominations -- the actor's life and late career were a tempest of personal turmoil and, in the eyes of many, a disappointing squandering of talent. Still, in his late 40s he more than redeemed himself with two of his most mesmerizing portrayals: His performance as Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather, for which he won his second Oscar, represented, among other things, a passing of the generational torch with Brando sharing scenes with actors such as Al Pacino, Robert Duvall and James Caan. »

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Marlon Brando Dies at 80

2 July 2004 | IMDb News

Marlon Brando, the legendary actor whose performances in A Streetcar Named Desire, The Godfather and Last Tango in Paris made him one of the most important screen actors of all time and whose larger-than-life persona offscreen dominated his later years, died Thursday at an undisclosed location in Los Angeles; he was 80. According to Brando's attorney, David J. Seeley, the cause of the actor's death was being withheld because the actor was "a very private man." (A later report from Reuters stated that a UCLA Medical Center spokesperson said the actor died there at 6:30pm on Thursday of lung failure.) The most famous proponent of Method acting and considered by many to be America's finest actor, Brando paved the way for a new style of acting in the 40s and 50s, first working on Broadway, where he created his first signature role as Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire. He made his screen debut in 1950's The Men, which was followed by his Oscar-nominated re-creation of Kowalski in Elia Kazan's film of A Streetcar Named Desire. Riding his sudden superstardom, roles in Viva Zapata, Julius Caesar, The Wild One and On the Waterfront followed, the latter of which won him his first Oscar. Once he became a true icon in the late 50s and 60s, he branched into directing (1961's One Eyed Jacks) and a troubled, bloated adaptation of Mutiny on the Bounty, where his need for perfection (and infatuation with the south Pacific) put the movie over budget and over schedule.

That film marked the beginning of a string of failures in the 60s, and by the early 70s the actor's star seemed to have faded. However, it was a little gangster film in 1972 called The Godfather that catapulted Brando back into the spotlight, and his phenomenal turn as mob boss Vito Corleone earned him a second Oscar . which he notoriously refused, sending an actress dressed in Native American garb to the Academy Award ceremony to reject the award with a diatribe against the wrongs done to Native Americans by the U.S. He courted even more controversy with Bernardo Bertolucci's X-rated Last Tango in Paris (though he grabbed another Oscar nomination), and appeared in both Hollywood projects (Superman, for which he received a record salary at the time) and award-winning films (appearing as Kurtz in Francis Ford Coppola's troubled masterpiece Apocalypse Now) through the 70s. Sporadic film appearances marked the end of his career, including The Freshman, A Dry White Season and Don Juan De Marco, and his later years were dominated by scandal when his son, Christian Brando, shot and killed the lover of his half sister, Cheyenne, at the family's home in 1990; Christian was jailed and Cheyenne committed suicide five years later. Legal fees reportedly drained the actor's fortune, and the scandal contributed to the stories of Brando's bizarre offscreen antics. He lived in seclusion for the past few years, and most recently was the target of yet more rumors to be published in an unauthorized biography (one of many). Details about funeral arrangements were not immediately forthcoming. --Prepared by IMDb staff »

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Mediaset big winner in Telegatti TV awards

6 April 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

ROME -- Mediaset TV channels brought home the lion's share of awards Monday evening at the 21st annual Telegatti Awards, Italy's biggest TV prizes. Mediaset channels took home awards for best TV fiction; best male character, to Alessandro Preziosi; best female character, to Vitoria Puccini; and best TV program of the year for Elisa di Rivombrosa, a love story produced by Mediaset and set in nineteenth-century Turin. The awards' international guests this year included Francis Ford Coppola, Sofia Coppola, Philippe Noiret, Sidney Poitier, Harvey Keitel and Eric Roberts. Harvey Keitel received this year's TV critics' award, while Philippe Noiret and Sidney Poitier received special awards for their career. »

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Drunk Murray Rates Kathleen Turner's Bedroom Performance

2 April 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

An inebriated Bill Murray gave Kathleen Turner's bedroom skills a high rating this week - in front of an all star audience. Funnyman Murray was hosting a benefit at New York's Museum Of Modern Art for Sofia Coppola, who directed him in the Oscar-winning Lost In Translation, in front of a panel which included Hollywood players Kirsten Dunst, Jake Gyllenhaal, Kyra Sedgwick, Kevin Bacon, Claire Danes and Turner herself. Merry Murray blurted, "She's a great f***!," before blaming the cans of sparkling wine supplied by Francis Ford Coppola for his outburst. He later admitted: "I've had six." »

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IEG to 'Shepherd' funds for Uni pic

30 March 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Graham King's Initial Entertainment Group will co-finance Good Shepherd, the Leonardo DiCaprio starrer that Robert De Niro is directing for Universal Pictures and Tribeca Prods. In addition, King joins Tribeca's Jane Rosenthal as a producer on the picture. Francis Ford Coppola and Rick Schwartz are serving as executive producers. Written by Eric Roth, Shepherd will star DiCaprio as James Wilson, an idealistic, patriotic young man recruited fresh out of Yale University to become one of the founding officers of the CIA. The story chronicles the history of the CIA through Wilson's 40-year career and the toll his work takes on his life and family. De Niro will take a small role in the film. The project is a reunion of sorts for the two, as they both starred in 1993's This Boy's Life. »

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IFP Spirit awards get 'Lost' with Coppola, Murray nods

1 March 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation charmed the 2004 IFP Independent Spirit Awards, which took place Saturday afternoon in Santa Monica. The Focus Features film, produced by Coppola and Ross Katz, was hailed as best feature for its bittersweet look at two lost souls stranded in a Tokyo hotel. Coppola also took home the best director and best screenplay trophies. And Bill Murray was named best male lead for his performance as an American actor visiting Japan to shoot a whiskey commercial. "I feel like a real hog today", Coppola said during one of her frequent trips to the podium. But she reserved a special thanks for her father, Francis Ford Coppola, with whom she was sitting, saying, upon picking up her director's trophy, "And to my dad for telling me never to use video assist." "I don't have any prepared remarks -- I didn't feel that would be independent," Murray cracked upon taking the stage. "But I really like this independent thing. I really do. I like the way this film was made. They went around and they begged and they borrowed and, in some cases, they did steal." »

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'Lost' finds top WGA nod

23 February 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Sofia Coppola's Oscar momentum got a big boost Saturday when the WGA awarded Lost in Translation its top honor for original screenplay. Robert Pulcini and Shari Springer Berman earned the laurel for adapted screenplay for bringing comic book cult hero Harvey Pekar's life to the screen in American Splendor, which also is an underdog favorite for adapted screenplay in Sunday's awards season grand finale, the Academy Awards. The guild embraced the auteur at the 56th annual WGA Awards, held at the Century Plaza Hotel, as both Lost and Splendor were also directed by their screenwriters. In accepting her award, Coppola thanked her brother Roman and other friends she called for encouragement "when I was stuck" while writing Lost, a story of loneliness and longing between strangers in a strange land. Coppola's win makes her one of a handful of women to take the guild's top film honor. It also came 33 years after her father, Francis Ford Coppola, won his first WGA award, for 1970's Patton (which also earned the elder Coppola his first Oscar). Coppola told reporters after the ceremony that she has been humbled by all the accolades showered on Lost, but she allowed that the thumbs up from her fellow scribes might just give her "a little extra strut to my step" at Sunday's Oscar ceremony. »

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8 items from 2004


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