Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 121 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The 20 Best '70s Movies on Netflix Right Now

21 May 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

The '70s was an exciting decade for cinema, with bold new filmmakers Martin Scorsese, William Friedkin and Francis Ford Coppola and right now, great films from all of them are streaming on Netflix.

Return to the gritty New York City of the '70s with "The French Connection," "Taxi Driver," "Serpico" or check out Coppola's lesser-known but masterful thriller "The Conversation." You can also stream classics "The Exorcist," the original "Assault on Precinct 13," or "Three Days of the Condor."

Those are just a few of the great '70s movies now on Netflix. Availability is subject to change, so don't wait too long to start your '70s movie marathon: You have until June 30 to watch "Taxi Driver." »

- Sharon Knolle

Permalink | Report a problem


The 5 Best Films of Francis Ford Coppola

21 May 2015 2:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor's Note: Indiewire has partnered with the El Rey Network in support of the iTunes release of their original show Director’s Chair. Top directors tackle insightful questions only other directors would think to ask. Find out more here.] Read More: The 5 Best Films of Quentin Tarantino Francis Ford Coppola's 1970s classics still hold a contemporary feel and artistic vitality, four decades later. From the consummate tale of family and power in "The Godfather" to the ever-prescient political thriller "The Conversation," his best works are definitive genre exercises, blending unwavering realism with escalating tension and a potent moral consideration.  Though his directorial stamp is unmistakable, Coppola has under his belt among the most celebrated family, political, crime and war films in the American canon. He has twice won the Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Director, and is one of only eight filmmakers to win the Cannes Film »

- David Canfield

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Robert Rodriguez and Robert Zemeckis Talk Failure in 'The Director's Chair'

19 May 2015 10:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

How do you get inside a director's head? Get another director to be your guide, of course. This format is the premise of the original series "El Rey Network Presents: The Director's Chair," which returns with new episodes at the end of this month. Read More: Robert Rodriguez On Why He Launched a TV Network To Reflect Diversity In Front of And Behind The Camera Hosted by writer-director Robert Rodriguez, "The Director's Chair" feature hour-long interviews with some of cinema's finest -- including John Carpenter, Guillermo del Toro, Francis Ford Coppola and longtime Rodriguez friend Quentin Tarantino. The promotional video above teases an interview with writer-director Robert Zemeckis: The episode with the Zemeckis interview is slated to premiere May 31 on El Rey, but is available exclusively on iTunes right now for free. Future episodes of "The Director's Chair" will be available on iTunes the day after airing. To learn more about the series, »

- Shipra Harbola Gupta

Permalink | Report a problem


Ten Weddings and No Funerals: The Greatest Cinematic Nuptials

18 May 2015 5:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

There are few rituals in life more chaotic, confounding and magical than the wedding. Appropriately, marriages have provided the backdrop for many a story spun through the ages. Whether it’s sending out multitudes of wedding invitations, choosing the right dress, or whether to seat Aunt Mabel next to her second or fifth ex-husband at the reception, weddings both in life and on film are almost always guaranteed to bring forth a surge of emotions. Below are a few of our favorite cinematic nuptials:

1. The Searchers (1956)

John Ford’s western masterpiece is full of many iconic moments, not the least of which is one of the screen’s greatest knock-down, drag-out fights between Jeffrey Hunter and Ken Curtis for the hand of comely Vera Miles. Martin Scorsese loved this scene so much, he paid homage by having his characters watch it in Mean Streets (1973).

2. Rachel Getting Married »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Review: Palme D'Or Winner Nanni Moretti Returns To Form With 'Mia Madre' Starring John Turturro

16 May 2015 4:28 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Only a handful of filmmakers have ever won the Palme D'Or twice (among them: the Dardennes, Michael Haneke, and Francis Ford Coppola), and it looks like this year won't be the one that another pulls off the achievement. "Uncle Boonmee" helmer Apichatpong Weerasethakul has been relegated to Un Certain Regard with his new movie, while "Elephant" director Gus Van Sant's dreadful "Sea Of Trees" isn't going to be challenging for any prizes. That just leaves one other previous Palme-winner in Competition: Italian filmmaker Nanni Moretti, who won for "The Son's Room" in 2001. Whether or not his new film, "Mia Madre," can challenge for the big prize remains to be seen, but after the relative disappointments of "The Caiman" and "We Have A Pope," it certainly serves as a return to form. Read More:  Watch: First Trailer For Nanni Moretti's 'Mia Madre' Starring Margherita Buy & John Turturro The film centers. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

Permalink | Report a problem


Round-Up: The Shining 35th Anniversary Screening, Dark Was The Night, Poltergeist

15 May 2015 7:58 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Next week marks the 35th anniversary of Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, and it will be screening during the 16th season of Film on the Rocks on June 9th. Also in this round-up: a Dark Was the Night trailer and listing information for the house from Poltergeist.

The Shining 35th Anniversary Screening: Press Release -- "Denver Film Society and Denver Arts & Venues announced the line-up for the 2015 edition of Film on the Rocks (Fotr). Presented by Pepsi, the 16th season includes nine events throughout the summer. Each film is preceded by a live concert and local comedian, courtesy of Comedy Works.

"Memorial Day weekend is the traditional start to Summer and Film on the Rocks is a Colorado Summer tradition," said Britta Erickson, Festival Director for the Denver Film Society. "We are so excited to kick off the season on the holiday weekend and bring cult-classic and fan-favorite films, great »

- Tamika Jones

Permalink | Report a problem


George Lucas: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the 'Star Wars' Guru

14 May 2015 5:30 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

George Lucas didn't just create the "Star Wars" universe. The filmmaker, who turns 71 on May 14, pretty much created the cinematic universe we live in now, the ones whose cornerstones include the Thx sound system at your multiplex, the Pixar movies that have dominated animation for the past 20 years, and the Industrial Light & Magic special-effects house, whose aesthetic has ruled the Hollywood blockbuster for nearly four decades. He's the pioneer of the effects-driven action spectacle and the conversion from celluloid to digital, the two trends that, for better and worse, have defined Hollywood's output for nearly 20 years.

As ubiquitous as Lucas and his creations loom in our cinematic dreamscapes, there's still a lot that most people don't know about him, from how he got his start to the famous folks who mentored him or were mentored by him, from the size of his fortune to what he plans to do now »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Early Morphine Addiction Drama Marred by Several Hammy Performances

11 May 2015 2:22 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'A Hatful of Rain' with Lloyd Nolan, Anthony Franciosa and Don Murray 'A Hatful of Rain' script fails to find cinematic voice as most of the cast hams it up Based on a play by Michael V. Gazzo, A Hatful of Rain is an interesting attempt at injecting "adult" subject matters – in this case, the evils of drug addiction – into Hollywood movies. "Interesting," however, does not mean either successful or compelling. Despite real, unromantic New York City locations and Joseph MacDonald's beautifully realistic black-and-white camera work (and the pointless use of CinemaScope), this Fred Zinnemann-directed melodrama feels anachronistically stagy as a result of its artificial dialogue and the hammy theatricality of its performers – with Eva Marie Saint as the sole naturalistic exception. 'A Hatful of Rain' synopsis Somewhat revolutionary in its day (Otto Preminger's The Man with a Golden Arm,* also about drug addiction, »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Le Conversazioni 2015 by Anne-Katrin Titze

10 May 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Stephen Sondheim and Joyce Carol Oates in conversation before Antonio Monda's Le Conversazioni Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Following his fall 2014 Le Conversazioni with Zadie Smith (White Teeth) and Patrick McGrath (Asylum and Spider), Antonio Monda invited Joyce Carol Oates and Stephen Sondheim to discuss films that influenced their lives and work.

Henry Hathaway's Niagara, Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation, Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull and Elia Kazan's On The Waterfront were chosen by Joyce Carol Oates.

George Stevens' The More The Merrier, Mike van Diem's Character (Karakter), Krzysztof Zanussi's The Contract and Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow Of A Doubt were picked by Stephen Sondheim.

Le Conversazioni and Rome Film Festival Artistic Director Antonio Monda Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Marilyn Monroe, Dustin Hoffman, Katharine Hepburn, Jean Arthur, Walk Don't Run with Cary Grant, Privacy, Gene Hackman, West Side Story, Vertigo, The Rules Of The Game, Marlon Brando, »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

Permalink | Report a problem


Tim and Daphne Maxwell Reid Sell Their New Millennium Studios (The End of a Dream)

9 May 2015 11:06 AM, PDT | ShadowAndAct | See recent ShadowAndAct news »

Tyler Perry is far from being the only filmmaker who has owned a production studio, which may come as a surprise to some. For example, Charlie Chaplin, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert Aldrich, as well as Ridley and his late brother Tony Scott, have all either owned a film studio, or held part ownership of one at one time or another. Chaplin was perhaps the most successful of the lot, building his own studio in Los Angeles in 1917, and owned it until 1953 when he sold all his U.S. properties and assets as he moved to Europe after running afoul with the U.S. Government because of his progressive leftist political views, and his “immoral” behavior, resulting in several public »

- Sergio

Permalink | Report a problem


Nicolas Cage: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

6 May 2015 3:03 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

It was August, 2005. I knocked on the double door at the Four Seasons. It opened almost immediately. "Hi, I'm Nic," he said, hand outstretched. Nicolas Cage wasn't who I expected him to be. Like all actors, he was smaller and trimmer in person than he appeared on-screen. Neatly dressed in an Armani suit, Cage also displayed none of the manic fervor in real life as had become his signature on-screen. He was thoughtful, well-spoken and incredibly literate in all seven arts. It's an infrequent experience that you leave an interview feeling you've just met someone that you could hang out with regularly, but I got that with Nic Cage, in spades. He was endlessly fascinating, but also kind of a regular guy. Another of my favorite chats I count myself lucky to have been part of.

Nicolas Cage: Lord Of The Nerds

By

Alex Simon

It’s an inevitable »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

Permalink | Report a problem


Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Robert De Niro’s Audition for ‘The Godfather’

30 April 2015 11:13 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Watching Robert De Niro’s audition tape for “The Godfather,” it’s hard to remember the guy was an Off-Broadway actor pretty much unknown in Hollywood circles. In just a few moments, he presents a fully lived-in character, bouncing off the unseen reader with equal parts charm and cunning. He clearly belongs in the film’s universe. De Niro is so poised and natural in the role of Sonny Corleone, you almost forget the part eventually went to James Caan. He read for multiple characters in the film; director Francis Ford Coppola eventually decided to hold off and offer him the part of Vito Corleone—the younger version of Marlon Brando’s character—in “The Godfather Part II.” That movie, of course, made De Niro internationally recognizable and the first actor to win an Academy Award for speaking mainly a foreign language. To think it all started with this audition! »

Permalink | Report a problem


My favourite Cannes winner: Apocalypse Now

30 April 2015 5:40 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Continuing our series in which writers choose their favourite Palme d’Or victor,

Alex Hess views Francis Ford Coppola’s triumph at the 1979 festival as vindication of the film-maker’s own journey into the heart of darkness

You might think that Apocalypse Now finishes in Cambodia, but in fact it’s in Cannes that the film’s real story comes to an end. While the Nung river was the site of Colonel Kurtz’s ruin, it was in the French Riviera that Francis Ford Coppola found his redemption.

After his sanity, pride and career were driven to the brink of oblivion during filming, Coppola’s Palme d’Or triumph at the festival in 1979 was, at long last, proof that it had been worth all the hassle. The film, which had begun shooting three years previously, had been dubbed Apocalypse When? by studio suits who were doubtful it would ever see the light of day, »

- Alex Hess

Permalink | Report a problem


Why 1974 was the best year in film history

29 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask »

- Daniel Fienberg

Permalink | Report a problem


Why 1988 was the best year in movie history

29 April 2015 8:12 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. While I tend to think of the '80s as a crassly commercial lull between the artistic adventurousness of the '70s and the independent experimentation of the '90s, there were things about the '80s that i hold dear in terms of what I love about movies. And if you're talking about the best of the '80s, the year that crystallized all the things the decade did well was 1988, a year that looks upon closer inspection like an embarrassment of riches. One of my twenty favorite films of all time, as outlined in this article, was released in 1988, which automatically makes it a year worth closer consideration. The '80s may have begun with one of his strongest films, but »

- Drew McWeeny

Permalink | Report a problem


Far from the Madding Crowd movie review: a woman’s choices

29 April 2015 6:30 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

Ridiculously romantic in all the best ways, and more modern, more progressive, and even just plain more grownup that half the movies thrown at us today. I’m “biast” (pro): love the cast; desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have read the source material (but not since high school and have no strong memory of it)

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

The novel it’s based on is a century and a half old, and it opens with a mad-sheepdog accident, of all the crazy rural old-fashioned things, but this new cinematic adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd is more modern, more progressive, and even just plain more grownup that half the movies thrown at us in our stodgy convention-bound movie landscape. And it’s not always modern in positive ways! The challenges faced by »

- MaryAnn Johanson

Permalink | Report a problem


Education Impact: 40 Showbiz Programs Prep Future Pros

28 April 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

From NYC to New South Wales, these stellar schools earn accolades for their showbiz programs.

U.S. Showbiz Programs

American Film Institute

Los Angeles

AFI’s Conservatory is training 260 Fellows that are all, per the school, “worthy to watch.” The school’s participants create between four and 10 movies during the two-year program, and 37 alumni have received Oscar nominations in the past decade alone. An additional 118 have participated in award-winning projects ranging from “Boyhood” to “Mad Men.”

Art Center College of Design

Pasadena, Calif

The venerable private college’s film and graduate broadcast program continues to establish itself as an influential entity through its immersive curriculum and close working relationships between students and faculty. Its list of celebrated alumni includes director Zack Snyder and conceptual designers Ralph McQuarrie (“Star Wars”) and Syd Mead (“Blade Runner”).

Boston U. Department Film & Television, College of Communication

Boston

2015 saw the establishment of a one-year Mfa program, »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Karlovy Vary unveils 50th plans

28 April 2015 7:16 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mel Gibson to film special trailer for the festival; plans for Lebanese cinema focus and tributes to late Us actor John Cazale and Chris Penn.

The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (Kviff) has unveiled plans for its 50th ‘annivarysary’ edition, set to run July 3-11.

The jubilee edition will include a look at recent Lebanese cinema, a retrospective of late Soviet-Ukrainian director Larisa Shepitko’s work and tributes to Us actors John Cazale and Chris Penn.

Actor-director Mel Gibson will also film a special trailer for the festival, set to be shot in Los Angeles in early May. The Lethal Weapon star received the Crystal Globe for Outstanding Artistic Contribution to World Cinema at last year’s Kviff.

Gibson continues a tradition that sees the recipients of this award feature in a short trailer for the following festival. It will be written and directed by Martin Krejčí, who has collaborated with Ivan Zachariáš since the beginning of the »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

Permalink | Report a problem


Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | 1997

1-20 of 121 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners