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1-20 of 177 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Christopher Nolan Easter Eggs: The 7 Best Hidden Gems in ‘Inception,’ ‘Dunkirk,’ and More

24 July 2017 11:09 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Christopher Nolan loves a good easter egg. Whether it’s a sly bit of casting, the use of subliminal imagery, or a line of dialogue with deeper implications then you may realize, Nolan often hides clues and secret messages in his films that are just waiting to be discovered. Of course the internet has devoted a ton of time searching for Nolan’s best easter eggs over the years, and we’ve rounded up 7 of the best hidden gems to look for in his filmography.

Read More: ‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made

Nolan is currently riding high off the success of “Dunkirk,” his WWII drama that exceeded expectations at the box office by opening to $50.5 million this weekend. The film should enjoy a healthy run thanks to strong word of mouth and critical acclaim. IndieWire named “Dunkirk” the best »

- Zack Sharf

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“Dunkirk” is a towering achievement from Christopher Nolan

20 July 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

When it was announced that filmmaker Christopher Nolan’s next project was going to be a World War II epic, it was hard not to respond with some degree of snark that the director had finally gone all in on getting the Academy to notice him. Well, Oscar damn well might come calling this time for Nolan, since I’ve seen this film, and Dunkirk is a monumental work. In many ways it’s Nolan’s finest hour. Harrowing, impeccably made, and a must see in IMAX, it’s the best movie of 2017 so far. Awards will be coming Dunkirk’s way before all is said and done. This one not only lives up to the hype, it exceeds it. Opening Friday, it’s an absolute must see. The film is an historical war drama about the famous evacuation of Dunkirk. Allied soldiers from Belgium, the Britain, and France were »

- Joey Magidson

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Review: ‘Dunkirk’ Conjures Grand Imagery Undercut by Structural Ambition

20 July 2017 10:35 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Although being less-than-inclined to endure whatever tests will give me a solid answer that ensures my hearing isn’t damaged in any notable way, the thought continually crossed my mind during a 70mm IMAX presentation of Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk. Sample dialogue from my screening includes: “Hrmmmfrrrrshrrr”; “ay, laddie, why don’t ya errbrrrfiiii”; and “we’re appraaaaa ghhhhh.” I simply, sincerely could not tell you what Nolan, writer, thought wise to have his characters tell each other, but I certainly saw what Nolan, director, had in mind, and that’s good enough — if only that far. As marketing and related hullabaloo would suggest, it’s the visual specification that matters most; and per WB’s diligence and my good fortune of living in a properly equipped city, the thing has been viewed as intended. As shot on 65mm by Hoyte van Hoytema, here reuniting with his partner on Interstellar, »

- Nick Newman

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Great Job, Internet!: Let us begin the wearying task of debating the best Christopher Nolan film

20 July 2017 9:55 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Christopher Nolan’s 10th film—the terse, action-packed Dunkirk—comes out tomorrow, and it’s being hailed as one of the finest in the director’s career. That slate of 10 works, largely written and directed by Nolan and his brother, Jonathan, comprises one of the richer filmographies in popular cinema, traversing noir, sci-fi, superheroes, and more, all while reliably cobbling together Hollywood superstars and far-reaching ideas about love, consciousness, storytelling, technology, and Michael Caine. Now some 20 years removed from his debut Following, Nolan has yet to release a bad film, meaning that it is high time we all began slap-fighting amongst ourselves as to which one is the best and which is the worst.

Helping in that effort is this primer by Screen Prism, which runs through the director’s entire filmography, cataloging his running trademarks and analyzing his many meta-narratives and ambiguous endings. But even it can »

- Clayton Purdom

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The Quiet American (1958)

17 July 2017 8:26 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

There appear to be no rules governing tricky politics in movies — Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s adaptation of Graham Greene’s novel about terrorism in French-held Vietnam completely reverses the author’s message. Does a conspiracy theory about a movie still carry any weight, when our daily political life now plays like one giant conspiracy?

The Quiet American

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1958 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 122 min. / Street Date June 13, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Audie Murphy, Michael Redgrave, Claude Dauphin, Giorgia Moll,

Bruce Cabot, Fred Sadoff, Kerima, Richard Loo.

Cinematography: Robert Krasker

Film Editor: William Hornbeck

Original Music: Mario Nascimbene

Written by Joseph L. Mankiewicz from a novel by Graham Greene

Produced and Directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Fans of author Graham Greene know him for his political sophistication and his adherence to Catholic themes; he’s found holy values in a razor-wielding Spiv in Brighton Rock and »

- Glenn Erickson

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Why Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner Are the Best Indie Producers in the World Right Now

10 July 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Working Title producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, whose latest hit is Edgar Wright’s wheel-and-disc-spinning breakout “Baby Driver” (June 28, Sony), which has tracked $64 million worldwide to date.

Bottom Line: This brainy duo with plummy British accents have been turning out a consistent slate of smart global hits since the ’80s. The London-based co-chairmen of Working Title boast the best taste in the business. They chase mainstream quality fare. That’s their gig. But even so over the years, partnering with Universal Pictures, with freedom to greenlight movies up to $35 million, their films have grossed an impressive almost $7 billion dollars worldwide.

Career Peaks: From the start, Working Title founder Tim Bevan gravitated to local stories with global potential like “My Beautiful Laundrette,” Stephen Frears’ searing »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner Are the Best Indie Producers in the World Right Now

10 July 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Working Title producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, whose latest hit is Edgar Wright’s wheel-and-disc-spinning breakout “Baby Driver” (June 28, Sony), which has tracked $64 million worldwide to date.

Bottom Line: This brainy duo with plummy British accents have been turning out a consistent slate of smart global hits since the ’80s. The London-based co-chairmen of Working Title boast the best taste in the business. They chase mainstream quality fare. That’s their gig. But even so over the years, partnering with Universal Pictures, with freedom to greenlight movies up to $35 million, their films have grossed an impressive almost $7 billion dollars worldwide.

Career Peaks: From the start, Working Title founder Tim Bevan gravitated to local stories with global potential like “My Beautiful Laundrette,” Stephen Frears’ searing »

- Anne Thompson

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On my radar: Jack O’Connell’s cultural highlights

9 July 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The actor on a book of ancient wisdom, the effortless cool of Fat White Family, hurling, asparagus and Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake

Born in Alvaston, Derby, in 1990, Jack O’Connell made his film debut in 2006 as reluctant neo-Nazi Pukey in Shane Meadows’s This Is England, before landing the part of Cook in Skins. Following turns in Starred Up and Harry Brown – for which Michael Caine labelled him a “star of the future” – he was cast as the lead in Angelina Jolie’s 2014 film Unbroken, about a second world war bombardier and Olympic athlete who ends up in a prisoner-of-war camp. In 2015 he won the Ee rising star award at the Baftas, and the following year appeared in Jodie Foster’s Money Monster. O’Connell stars opposite Sienna Miller in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof  at London’s Apollo theatre from 13 July.

Continue reading »

- Kathryn Bromwich

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On my radar: Jack O’Connell’s cultural highlights

9 July 2017 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The actor on a book of ancient wisdom, the effortless cool of Fat White Family, hurling, asparagus and Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake

Born in Alvaston, Derby, in 1990, Jack O’Connell made his film debut in 2006 as reluctant neo-Nazi Pukey in Shane Meadows’s This Is England, before landing the part of Cook in Skins. Following turns in Starred Up and Harry Brown – for which Michael Caine labelled him a “star of the future” – he was cast as the lead in Angelina Jolie’s 2014 film Unbroken, about a second world war bombardier and Olympic athlete who ends up in a prisoner-of-war camp. In 2015 he won the Ee rising star award at the Baftas, and the following year appeared in Jodie Foster’s Money Monster. O’Connell stars opposite Sienna Miller in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof  at London’s Apollo theatre from 13 July.

Continue reading »

- Kathryn Bromwich

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‘Fleabag’: How Phoebe Waller-Bridge Plans to Change The Show Everyone Loves in Season 2

6 July 2017 11:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

If you were hooked on “Fleabag,” one of the more striking British TV imports in the streaming era, odds are good it happened the first time Phoebe Waller-Bridge stared right into camera. As much as that stylistic choice came to cement Waller-Bridge’s unique connection with audiences in her home country and abroad, there was no guarantee that Fleabag’s instantly iconic fourth-wall moments would stick around.

“I always told myself the rule I had was that she only needed the camera there because she was constantly on the verge of needing to confess,” Waller-Bridge said of the character she writes and performs herself.

Confess what, exactly? Well, Season 1 of the Amazon series ends with Fleabag acknowledging an unexpected role she played in driving her best friend Boo to suicide.

“That was such a defining part of the show, looking at the camera, but I can’t bring myself, even as an actor, »

- Steve Greene

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‘Fleabag’: How Phoebe Waller-Bridge Plans to Change The Show Everyone Loves in Season 2

6 July 2017 11:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If you were hooked on “Fleabag,” one of the more striking British TV imports in the streaming era, odds are good it happened the first time Phoebe Waller-Bridge stared right into camera. As much as that stylistic choice came to cement Waller-Bridge’s unique connection with audiences in her home country and abroad, there was no guarantee that Fleabag’s instantly iconic fourth-wall moments would stick around.

“I always told myself the rule I had was that she only needed the camera there because she was constantly on the verge of needing to confess,” Waller-Bridge said of the character she writes and performs herself.

Confess what, exactly? Well, Season 1 of the Amazon series ends with Fleabag acknowledging an unexpected role she played in driving her best friend Boo to suicide.

“That was such a defining part of the show, looking at the camera, but I can’t bring myself, even as an actor, »

- Steve Greene

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Win ‘Security’ On DVD – The Antonio Banderas Starrer Is Out Now

3 July 2017 9:32 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

A stellar cast leads the gripping edge-of-your seat thriller Security, available on DVD and Digital Download on July 3 from Arrow Films. Starring Antonio Banderas (The Mask of Zorro, Once Upon A Time in Mexico, Shrek) as a down-on-his-luck security guard and Sir Ben Kingsley (Iron Man 3, Shutter Island) as the psychopathic criminal he’s up against, Security is a spectacular and explosive ride guaranteed to thrill action fans, and we have three copies of the film to give away on DVD.

An ex-special services veteran (Banderas), down on his luck and desperate for work, takes a job as a security guard at a run-down mall in a rough area of town. On his first night on the job he opens the doors up to a distraught and desperate young girl who has escaped and fled from a hijacking of the Police motorcade that was transporting her to testify as »

- Paul Heath

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The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’

23 June 2017 7:06 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It’s no secret that sex sells, and movies are no exception. But while plenty of films like to show gratuitous sex, they’re not always very good. That’s a problem, since movies have the power to shape not only the cultural norms, but personal ones. And what could be more personal than sex? Sexuality is an integral part of the human experience, not some sensational or shameful ploy to sell tickets (though it doesn’t hurt).

That’s why we think it’s important to single out the very best films that also happen to be incredibly sexy, titillating, and provocative. These are not only some of our favorite films in general, but they’re films that celebrate the broad spectrum of human sexuality while telling stories as cinematic as they are personal. Some don’t have any sex scenes at all, while some are notoriously near-pornographic. When these movies do show sex it is always in service of the story, and always in order to challenge, subvert, or celebrate contemporary beliefs about sexuality.

Turn on (and get turned on) by our list of the 25 best sexy movies of the 21st century (well, so far). You know you want to.

25. “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (2008)

Undeniably sexy and amusing at once, Woody Allen’s 2008 Spain-set dramedy delights in pushing its various players into all sorts of romantic permutations and configurations. Anchored by Scarlett Johansson in a sneaky performance as the eponymous Cristina (pre-breakout Rebecca Hall is her best pal Vicky), the film follows a pair of friends as they meet and make lots of love with the beguiling Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), who isn’t at all thrown off by the possibility of having two lovely ladies in his bed. In fact, he’s got another one to think about too, his free-spirited ex-wife (Penelope Cruz), who he just can’t get out of his head (or heart). On the surface, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” is a dead sexy romp about free-wheeling love-makers (complete with plenty of naughty bits), but it’s also a film that boldly explores issues of fluidity and fidelity with an uncharacteristically easy touch. -Ke

24. “Shortbus” (2006)

With its three-person blowjob circle, non-simulated sex scenes including ejaculation, and close-up of a pee stream unleashing into a bathtub, “Shortbus” is not for everyone. It’s an ambitious film, one that attempts to have fun, be sexy, and tell a good story. If anyone could pull it off, it would be the man behind “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” John Cameron Mitchell. “Shortbus” feels as much like an ensemble comedy as a playful experiment, though the two main characters are a sex therapist who’s never had an orgasm and a retired gay sex worker experimenting with opening up his relationship. With their partners, they both begin attending a weekly artist and sex salon, each hoping inspiration will strike. Mitchell wanted to use sex in new cinematic ways, “because it’s too interesting to be left to porn.” If it’s interesting sex you want, “Shortbus” has got it. -Jd

23. “Brokeback Mountain” (2005)

The end of this film is so movingly profound that your memory of it might not be that it was all that sexy. The love between these two men, buried under their rugged cowboy exteriors, ends with what can only be described as a sense of life-defining tragedy. Yet it is those brief moments where they let themselves go and unleash their animalistic passion, which “Crouching Tiger” director Ang Lee captures in his normal visceral fashion, that add a level of eroticism and physically affection that nearly makes all the pain worth it. Ennis and Jack rotate from almost fighting, as they pull at each others’ denim-clad exterior, to moments of being naked and incredibly tender. It’s virtually every cowboy fantasy rolled up into one. That they can only be themselves in the privacy of the great outdoors makes everything that much more liberating. Watching this film in 2005 felt taboo and rebellious, which resulted in a charged atmosphere in packed mainstream cineplexes around the country. -Co

22. “In the Cut” (2003)

Jane Campion’s handle on female desire has always been one of her best attributes as a director (and she’s got a lot of them), but nothing in her filmography is as overtly sexy and emotionally challenging as her 2003 Meg Ryan-starrer “In the Cut” (and that includes “The Piano,” which has a sexiness and eroticism all its own). Our first introduction to Ryan’s character is rooted in her coming to heady terms with her own sexuality, a theme that carries over throughout the often grisly drama. Increasingly drawn to Mark Ruffalo as a moody detective looking to solve a local murder that Frannie is tangentially involved in, Ryan’s character pushes the boundaries of “acceptable” desire. It’s a theme that Campion giddily plays into with some of modern cinema’s most satisfying and profound sex scenes, many of which center on — gasp — Frannie’s own pleasure over that of Ruffalo’s character. -Ke

21. “Hustle & Flow” (2005)

Craig Brewer’s crowdpleaser about a pimp dreaming of music fame is anchored by strong performances from Terrence Howard, Taraji P. Henson, and Taryn Manning. Howard plays Djay, while Henson and Manning are Shug and Nola, two of his girls. Hot-tempered and passionate, Djay begins making tracks with his friend Key (Anthony Anderson), and discovers he has a gift for lyrics. The catchy original soundtrack helps sell the story, as Djay’s songs seem to actually have a chance at getting radio play. While the strip club setting provides ample shots of semi-nude women, Djay and Shug’s sweet romance gives the film its emotional core and shows a softer side to Djay (and his temper). Their undeniable chemistry leads the previously timid Shug to throw down a sexy hook, her raspy croon on “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” making Henson’s star power glaringly obvious. -Jd

20. “Beyond the Lights” (2014)

Chemistry is the name of the game in Gina Prince-Bythewood’s freight-train fast music industry romance, which pairs up rising starlet Gugu Mbatha-Raw (pure charm) alongside pre-“Birth of a Nation” Nate Parker. The pair exhibit major fireworks from the start, imagining Mbatha-Raw as hot new pop star Noni Jean, a big talent who is dangerously close to burning out and fading away, before she falls into the protective arms Parker’s do-gooder cop, Kaz Nicol. Prince-Bythewood’s film cannily sneaks in big questions about fame and the entertainment industry, along with issues regarding what’s actually sexy (Noni Jean is frequently kitted out in teensy costumes that make record execs happy, while diminishing her own humanity with every stitch), deep issues that are lovingly cradled by full-scale love story. When the pair finally give into their obvious attraction, “Beyond the Lights” pulls out the big guns, all gauzy love scenes and one particularly hot trip to Mexico, but the film maintains its sensuality by remembering that nothing is so sexy as mutual respect and admiration. -Ke

19. “In the Mood for Love” (2000)

Every Wong Kar-wai movie contains a kind of visual sensuality in every frame, but “In the Mood for Love” goes one step further — its slow-burning romance between a pair of would-be lovers who live across the hall from each other in sixties-era Hong Kong is rich with unobtainable desire. Much is left unsaid and unachieved about the fantasy of an extramarital affair shared by Chow Mo-wan (Tony Leung) and Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung), but the hints of attraction between them, unfolding in small gestures and passing glances, imbues each scene with the intensity of emotions specific to a period of repression. It’s a grand tragedy of issed opportunities framed by erotic implications. —Eric Kohn

18. “Ex Machina” (2014)

If you like high-tech voyeurism and intellectual sparring, you might find Alex Garland’s cerebral sci-fi thriller unearthing some hidden desires. An affable young programmer, Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), is invited to the secluded jungle home of the CEO of his company, Nathan (Oscar Isaac) to participate in a top-secret experiment. Nathan wants to know if the cyborg he has been developing, Ava (Alicia Vikander) can convince Caleb that she has real consciousness. The tension is ripe between Nathan and Caleb as each attempts to alternately impress and control the other, but it is Caleb’s obsession with saving Ava that raises questions about the hero myth. Ava is the embodiment of male fantasy, trapped within a body invented to please and serve. As the two men fight over who best understands her mind, it turns out Ava was pulling the strings all along. There’s nothing sexier than a woman in charge. -Jd

17. “Quills” (2000)

It’s easy enough to get sucked into “Quills” based on the promise of Joaquin Phoenix playing an earnest (and incredibly sexy) young priest tempted by his attraction to a chambermaid. But somehow, much like Kate Winslet’s Madeline, we fall under the spell of the charismatic Geoffrey Rush, who plays his role as the Marquis de Sade with a deliciously dirty panache befitting the notorious French writer. The Marquis’ libertine ways run counter to the no-nonsense Royer-Collard (Michael Caine), who takes over the asylum with the intention of stifling the writer’s creative output. But even his own wife is no match for the words of the Marquis, which ooze both sensuality and liberty. Before long, any initial apprehension to the Marquis de Sade (he is a dirty old man, after all) is fully given over to the hope that his debauchery will win out, and that his desire, as well as that of Madeline and Coulmier (Phoenix) will be fully fulfilled — even though we know this is impossible. -Jr

16. “A Bigger Splash” (2015)

Watching “A Bigger Splash” feels like observing a sizzling chess game of attraction. Luca Guadagnino sticks Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Matthias Schoenaerts, and Dakota Johnson on the world’s most gorgeous island and lets the sparks fly. Swinton plays a world-famous rock singer vacationing with her lover, a chiseled Schoenaerts who is practically a walking and talking sculpture of male beauty. Their time together is disrupted by the arrival of the rocker’s former lover and his daughter, a promiscuous young 22-year-old. Each character is so ready to succumb to sexual desire and so pent up with sexual attraction that Guadagnino creates the ultimate emotional orgy. The fun is in seeing how each person uses their sexuality to outsmart the next. You’ll be seduced from the first frame to the last. It feels like you’re watching each actor for the very first time. -Zs

On the next page: wild adventures in Florida, some of the century’s most jaw-dropping pairings, and at least one murder. 

Related storiesAbdellatif Kechiche is Auctioning Off 'Blue is the Warmest Color' Palme d'Or to Finance New FilmNetflix's New Ratings System Is a Terrible Idea13 Essential Lgbt Indies From the Post-'Brokeback Mountain' Era »

- Kate Erbland, Jude Dry, Eric Kohn, Zack Sharf and Jamie Righetti

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San Sebastian: Ricardo Darín To Be Honored at San Sebastian

21 June 2017 8:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Barcelona – Argentina’s Ricardo Darín will receive the San Sebastian Film Festival’s Donostia Award for career achievement on Sept. 26. The prize is the highest distinction given by the highest-profile fest in the Spanish-speaking world.

The Donostia Award was launched in 1986 and began by recognizing stars from Hollywood classic era –Gregory Peck, Bette Davis, Glenn Ford– to later expand to eminent and far more recent U.S, and European figures such as Al Pacino, Michael Caine and Susan Sarandon.

Buenos Aires-born Darín will receive the award at a presentation of Santiago Mitre’s “The Summit.” Via its Donostia Award, the festival will honor one of most charismatic and well-known of contemporary Latin-American actors who has worked with many of the Spanish-speaking world’s most prestigious filmmakers including Juan José Campanella, Adolfo Aristarain, Pablo Trapero, Fabián Bielinsky, Fernando Trueba, Cesc Gay and Mitre.

Darín is the second Latin-American actor distinguished with the honor, after Benicio del Toro in 2014. Darín’s recognition is in line with San Sebastian aim of strengthening links with Latin America, seen in its thriving Latin-American Co-production Forum, launched by fest director José Luis Rebordinos in 2011.

A co-production between K&S Films and La Union de los Ríos (Argentina), Mod Producciones (Spain) and Maneki Films (France), “The Summit” was also penned by Mitre and offers two intertwining plots –one focused on the personal life of an Argentine president, played by Darin, and the other depicting the political intrigue at a Latin American summit. Alongside Darín, Dolores Fonzi, Érica Rivas, Elena Anaya, Daniel Giménez Cacho and Christian Slater figure in the cast. The feature world premiered in Cannes’ One Certain Regard and is sold by Spain’s Film Factory Entertainment. It will be released in U.S. on Aug. 18 via Warner Bros Pictures International.

Darin’s career dates back to when he was five and began acting in TV series. His international breakthrough came with Fabian Bielinsky’s “Nine Queens.” Some of his most noteworthy performances have been in movies of Juan José Campanella’s, led by “The Secret in Their Eyes” who won a best foreign-language Academy Award). Darin also starred in ”Son of the Bride,” nominated for an Academy Award, ”Moon of Avellaneda,” also from Campanella, Fernando Trueba’s “The Dancer and the Thief,” Sebastián Borenzstein’s “Kóblic,” Damián Szifron’s “Wild Tales” and Pablo Trapero’s “White Elephant.”

Though he can shown large range, if there’s a Darín touch, perhaps its the light and tender irony he gives to many of his characters.

Spanish director Manuel Gutiérrez Aragón said of Darín: “All the characters he plays seem to have been especially written for him and only for him to play them. Darín lends transparency to characters he embodies.”

On of Latin America’s most bankable actors, whose presence can help pre-sell a movie, Darin’s selectiveness with the films he stars in has made his involvement an important pointer to a movie’s quality.

“The Secret of Their Eyes,” earned $6.4 million for Sony Pictures Classics in 2010 and “Wild Tales,” another Sony Pictures Classics pickup accumulated $44 million worldwide, a standout figure for a Spanish-language feature.

Darín took the best actor Silver Shell Award in San Sebastian for Cesc Gay’s “Truman.”

Related storiesCannes Film Review: 'The Summit'Glocal in Progress Launches at 2017 San Sebastian FestivalToulouse 2017 Films in Progress Selects 'Los Perros,' 'Hunting Season,' 'The Desert Bride' »

- Emilio Mayorga

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The Italian Job: how studio accounting reckoned it made a loss

19 June 2017 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Jun 26, 2017

The 1969 classic The Italian Job also highlighted the peculiarities of movie studio accounting...

It’s hard to find something close to precise figure when trying to ascertain just how much money the 1969 classic The Italian Job has brought in, but the film is widely regarded as a very successful one, Starring Michael Caine and Noel Coward, and with Peter Collinson directing, the movie was first released in June 1969.

On its original box office run, its receipts were said to be just shy of $10m. The film was a big success, although it struggled to hit in America. In fact, it failed to do so, instead garnering its sizeable support primarily in the UK, and across Europe.

Still, it’s enjoyed theatrical re-releases, a belated tie-in computer game, sizeable sales on VHS and DVD, and at the last count, two remakes. In 2003, F Gary Gray directed the »

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Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon Continue the Adventure in U.S. Trailer for ‘The Trip to Spain’

15 June 2017 4:28 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Averting the bigger is better approach that plagues most franchises, The Trip series is attuned to life’s simple pleasures: cuisine, comedy, and companionship. For Michael Winterbottom, Steve Coogan, and Rob Brydon, their third outing, The Trip to Spain, refreshingly doesn’t stray from the charismatic formula that has resulted in perhaps the most delightful series of films this decade. Ahead of a release this August, the first full trailer has now arrived.

“In reviewing one of The Trip films, the base criteria is perhaps different than that for any other feature. Are there laughs? Does the food look delectable? Are the vistas magnificent?,” I said after its Tribeca premiere. “Indeed, The Trip to Spain features hysterical impressions of Mick Jagger, Michael Caine, John Hurt, Robert De Niro, Marlon Brando, and half the James Bond actors over exquisitely-presented plates of chorizo, anchovies, flan, and mussels, all while surveying stunning rolling hills and coastal seascapes. »

- Jordan Raup

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Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon Make A Trip To Spain In New Trailer

14 June 2017 2:04 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

It’s been four years since The Trip To Italy. Now comes IFC’s third film in the series, The Trip To Spain, from director Michael Winterbottom.

After jaunts through northern England and Italy, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon embark on another deliciously deadpan culinary road trip. This time around, the guys head to Spain to sample the best of the country’s gastronomic offerings in between rounds of their hilariously off-the-cuff banter. Over plates of pintxos and paella, the pair exchange barbs and their patented celebrity impressions, as well as more serious reflections on what it means to settle into middle age. As always, the locales are breathtaking, the cuisine to die for, and the humor delightfully devilish.

The film opens in theaters August 11, 2017.

Steve’s film career includes five films with Michael Winterbottom.

The Trip To Spain is the third in an occasional series that began with 2011’s The Trip, »

- Michelle Hannett

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‘The Trip to Spain’ Trailer: Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s Latest Adventure Looks Truly Delicious

14 June 2017 1:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Prepare to get hungry for great food, beautiful vistas, celebrity impressions and the sorts of cruel jokes only two best friends can get away with, as IFC has released the official trailer for “The Trip to Spain.”

Read More: ‘Rules Don’t Apply’ Actor Steve Coogan on the Magical Year of ‘Philomena’ – Awards Season Flashback

Directed by Michael Winterbottom, “Spain” is the third film chronicling actors Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s culinary adventures through Europe (the previous installments took them through England and Italy). Playing (a version of) themselves, the two real life friends consume six incredible meals while trading barbs and Roger Moore impressions, as seen in the trailer below. The film also includes plenty of Spain-specific references, including a memorable homage to “Don Quixote.”

In his review, IndieWire’s David Ehrlich declared that “The Trip to Spain” was the year’s funniest film, writing that “director Michael Winterbottom »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Ranking The Pixar Sequels

12 June 2017 12:20 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of the release of Cars 3, Eric Bay-Andersen ranks Pixar’s sequels…

When people hear ‘sequel’, they usually think ‘shameless cash-in’, and although Disney’s purchase of Pixar must surely have influenced the number of sequels the studio has produced in the last 20 years (six with at least two more on the way), Pixar’s reputation for quality film-making means their hit-rate is higher than most. Here’s my ranking of the five they’ve released so far…

5. Cars 2

Astonishingly, the Cars franchise is the studio’s biggest money-maker when it comes to merchandise, but the second instalment is surely Pixar’s least-loved film so far (which doesn’t bode well for Cars 3). The first film had a slight charm to it, and a sweet message about the beauty of small-town life and finding happiness off the beaten track, but for the sequel they tossed all that »

- Amie Cranswick

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Glenne Headly obituary

12 June 2017 5:55 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Us actor best known for her role in the comedy Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

Glenne Headly, who has died aged 62 from complications after a pulmonary embolism, was a gifted, sympathetic actor equally accomplished at comedy and drama. She was widely loved for her jaunty turn in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988) as the soft-hearted dope targeted by two Côte d’Azur conmen, played by Michael Caine and Steve Martin.

Headly pulled off the difficult task of seeming oblivious to their tricks without appearing witless. In the film’s final moments, she turned the tables on her would-be exploiters in a satisfying switcheroo that Headly had helped cook up when the scripted ending proved inadequate. The director, Frank Oz, was pleasantly surprised. “People so far – and in a way I almost did it myself – have just been scratching the surface of her talent,” he said at the time.

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- Ryan Gilbey

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