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Interview: Thora Birch Talks The Competition (Exclusive)

  • ShockYa
Interview: Thora Birch Talks The Competition (Exclusive)
Contending with several bad experiences within a certain area of live can often times lead many people to shy away from willingly experiment within that field again. That’s certainly the case for actress Thora Birch’s protagonist in the upcoming quirky romantic comedy, ‘The Competition,’ which shows her enthusiastically denouncing serious romantic commitments. But the character […]

The post Interview: Thora Birch Talks The Competition (Exclusive) appeared first on Shockya.com.
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"The Competition"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek footage from the upcoming comedy feature "The Competition", directed by Harvey Lowry, starring Thora Birch, Claire Coffee and Chris Klein, opening January 26, 2018:

"...'Lauren Mauldin' encourages women to follow the 'Pig Theory' and to break up with men precisely at six months in order to avoid heartache.

"But then she meets 'Calvin Chesney', who refuses to be dumped. Instead, he challenges Lauren to a competition..."

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek "The Competition"...
See full article at SneakPeek »

Paramount Dates ‘G.I. Joe 3’ for 2020, ‘Dungeons & Dragons’ for 2021

Paramount Dates ‘G.I. Joe 3’ for 2020, ‘Dungeons & Dragons’ for 2021
Paramount has set a March 27, 2020, opening for its third “G.I. Joe” movie and dated “Dungeons & Dragons” for July 23, 2021.

The studio also announced Monday that it has set “Micronauts” for Oct. 16, 2020. None of the films have directors or stars attached.

The third “G.I. Joe” will be opening seven years after the second entry in the franchise, “G.I. Joe: Retaliation,” was released. That film starred Dwayne Johnson, Channing Tatum, and Bruce Willis, generating $375 million in worldwide grosses.

The original “G.I. Joe: Rise of the Cobra” starred Tatum and Marlon Wayans, producing a worldwide gross of $302 million in 2009. Both movies were produced by Lorenzo di Bonaventura and based on the Hasbro toyline.

“Dungeons & Dragons” originated in 1974 as a tabletop role-playing game. It’s been published by Hasbro subsidiary Wizards of the Coast for the past two decades. New Line released a movie version in 2000 that starred Thora Birch, Jeremy Irons, and [link=nm
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Exclusive: Thora Birch & Chris Klein star in new The Competition clip

  • JoBlo
Relationships barely play out in real life as they do in the movies. It’s never cute and whimsical, and more often than not there’s more booze involved than need be. But I guess that's why we go to the movies, and why there’s always an audience for movies like The Competition. Starring Thora Birch (American Beauty) and Chris Klein (American Pie), this rom-com pits two potential lovers in a relationship contest that could lead to a romance of their very... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

‘Lion’ and Nicole Kidman Dominate Australia’s AACTA Awards

‘Lion’ and Nicole Kidman Dominate Australia’s AACTA Awards
Lion” picked up a further five prizes at the Australian Academy of Cinematic and Television Arts Awards. Its haul included best picture and best director for Garth Davis.

The prizes were presented Wednesday evening at the Star Event Centre in Sydney. Earlier in the week at a prize-giving lunch, “Lion” made a clean sweep of the technical awards, winning in all seven categories for which it was nominated. In total, the film, which was produced by The Weinstein Co., won 12 Aacta awards.

The cast of “Lion” was richly rewarded. Nicole Kidman was named best supporting actress, Dev Patel was named best supporting actor, and child star Sunny Pawar was named best actor, becoming the youngest-ever recipient. Kidman won a second acting prize, for best guest or supporting actress in a TV drama, with “Top of the Lake: China Girl.” The series also earned a best actress award for Elisabeth Moss and a best guest or supporting actor in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ghost World

One of the best literary adaptions in many a moon, director Terry Zwigoff finds just the right tone for Daniel Clowes’s sweet and sour graphic novel about two teenage misfits (deftly inhabited by Thora Birch and Scarlett Johansson) and their oddball friendship with a misanthropic record collector played to a T by Steve Buscemi. The parade of oddballs who flesh out the story are a memorable lot including Bob Balaban and Illeana Douglas as a moonstruck art teacher.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Thora Birch & Chris Klein in First Trailer for Comedy 'The Competition'

"I'm suggesting a little competition..." Gravitas Ventures has debuted the first trailer for Harvey Lowry's indie comedy The Competition, making fun of relationships and the way things work in this day and age. Thora Birch stars as a woman who becomes the "voice of a generation" by starting a romance blog about how relationships should only last 6 months, at which point you must break up before your mate becomes unfaithful. She is introduced to the perfect guy, played by Chris Klein, but refuses his advances. So they setup a challenge to choose five friends in long relationships and attempt to get them to cheat. It plays out from there, and yadda yadda. The film's full cast includes Claire Coffee, David Blue, Gabrielle Stone, Jason Tobias, and Tiffany Fallon. Not really my kind of romantic comedy, but check this out if you want. Here's the first official trailer (+ poster) for Harvey Lowry's The Competition,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Thora Birch, Chris Klein Dating Comedy ‘The Competition’ Lands At Gravitas

Exclusive: Gravitas Ventures has secured the North American distribution rights to The Competition, which will get a theatrical and VOD release January 26. The romantic comedy stars Thora Birch (American Beauty), Chris Klein (American Pie), Claire Coffee (Grimm) and David Blue (Ugly Betty). Directed by Harvey Lowry and produced by Birch, the film follows Lauren (Birch) who, after one too many bad boyfriends, launches a blog promoting "The Pig Theory,” which insists that…
See full article at Deadline »

Halloween 2017: Siblings & Scares Double Feature – Mom’S Got A Date With A Vampire and Hocus Pocus

  • DailyDead
[To get you into the spooky spirit, the Daily Dead team is spotlighting double features that we think would be fun to watch this Halloween season. Check here for more double feature recommendations and other Halloween 2017 coverage.]

There’s nothing quite like an outside threat to bring a family together, especially when that threat is of the undead variety. Siblings may not always get along, but when your sister’s soul is sought by a coven of witches, or when your mom is eyed as an eternal bride by a coffin-dwelling creep, it’s time to take those Sister Sledge lyrics to heart and become a family that can overcome anything—including wicked spells and sharp fangs. Set on respective fateful nights where the future of a homestead hangs in the balance and its up to siblings to save it, Mom’s Got a Date with a Vampire and Hocus Pocus are family-friendly films that make for a great double feature during the Halloween season.

Perhaps the less-known of the two films, Mom’s Got a Date with a Vampire will likely ring a nostalgic bell for
See full article at DailyDead »

5 Best And Worst Theatre Experiences!

If you usually visit the theatre, it is almost a sure bet that you have had both a positive and negative experience at one point or another. Personally, I don’t understand why anybody would pay for a cinema ticket only to talk all their way through a film, when they could have easily just gone to a bar to talk each other’s ear off for a couple of hours.

Thankfully, my cinematic adventures in the theatre have been an enjoyable ride for the most part. Whether that was due to a film being so good that it had the ability to totally immerse me in it’s world or seeing a movie with an upbeat crowd of people, well, there are numerous considerations I could have picked from. In this piece I’m going to be talking about five theatre experiences that turned out to be memorable for both worthwhile reasons,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Hocus Pocus TV Film Reimagining Being Planned at Disney Channel

  • DailyDead
For many horror fans, Hocus Pocus is synonymous with the Halloween season, with its tale of a talking cat, a lovable zombie, and three witches out for revenge becoming a permanent fixture in many autumn movie marathons over the years. Now, 24 years after its initial release, Hocus Pocus is potentially being reimagined as a TV movie on the Disney Channel.

Deadline reports the news of the potential Hocus Pocus "reimagining," revealing that Scarlett Lacey (The Royals) is working on a script with David Kirschner on board as an executive producer. Kirschner, a producer of the original film, also helped come up with the story of Hocus Pocus, as he told a similar tale to his children as a bedtime story. Kenny Ortega, who directed the original film from a screenplay by Mick Garris and Neil Cuthbert, is not working on the reimagining.

The 1993 film featured a stellar cast whose chemistry
See full article at DailyDead »

Phillip Noyce to direct World War II thriller The Devil’s Brigade

Photo Credit: Gage Skidmore

Foresight Unlimited has tapped Australian filmmaker Phillip Noyce (Salt, The Bone Collector) to direct the World War II thriller The Devil’s Brigade, which is slated to go into production later this year and is currently in the casting stage.

According to Coming Soon, The Devil’s Brigade “tells the true story of how Davie Berman, the only Jewish member of the Luciano mob, is requested by the U.S. military to help turn the tide of events against the Germans in Italy. In organizing a team of Sicilian Cosa Nostra to work with the Americans, he almost single-handedly drives the Germans out of the southern region of Italy, and returns to America as a decorated hero.”

Noyce recently wrapped production on the crime thriller Above Suspicion starring Emilia Clarke, Thora Birch and Jack Huston, and is currently shooting the TV drama Reside, which features Emily VanCamp and Matt Czurchry.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Phillip Noyce set to direct 'The Devil’s Brigade'

Phillip Noyce set to direct 'The Devil’s Brigade'
Foresight Unlimited handles international sales on action-thriller set to begin filming in France end of this year.

Foresight Unlimited has announced that Phillip Noyce, director of Salt and The Bone Collector, will direct the Second World War action-thriller The Devil’s Brigade.

The Devil's Brigade centres on the true story of Davie Berman, the only Jewish member of the Luciano mob, who is requested by the Us military to help turn the tide of events against the Germans in Italy.

In organising a team of Sicilian Cosa Nostra to work with the Americans, he almost single-handedly drives the Germans out of the southern region of Italy, and returns to America as a decorated hero. Moshe Diamant will produce.

Australian-born Noyce is known for his work in action-dramas like Salt starring Angelina Jolie, Clear And Present Danger and Patriot Games. He also directed Rabbit-Proof Fence and The Quiet American.

On the TV side, Noyce is currently
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Review: "Ghost World" (2001); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

High school friends Enid Coleslaw (Thora Birch) and Rebecca Doppelmeyer (Scarlett Johansson) absolutely cannot wait to be free of the prison of school, defiantly flipping the bird and squashing their mortarboards following their graduation. Enid isn’t off the hook just yet: her “diploma” is instead a note informing her that she must “take some stupid art class” (her words) if she hopes to graduate. Their fellow classmates are caricatures of everyone we all knew during our adolescence. Melora (Debra Azar) is inhumanly happy all the time and oblivious to Enid and Rebecca’s sense of ennui and contempt. Todd (T.J. Thyne) is ultra-nervous to talk with the insouciant Rebecca at the punchbowl. Another bespectacled student sits off by himself. Enid and Rebecca are at both an intellectual and emotional crossroads. They want to share an apartment; however, they seem unaware of the amount of money they
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Criterion Now – Episode 24 – Ghost World, Crumb, Barnes & Noble Sale

Aaron, Travis and Tim Leggoe dig into the world of Terry Zwigoff, the Barnes & Noble Sale, predictions and wish lists for October Criterion releases, reactions to the Sean Baker episode, and plenty more. We also have announced a contest so listen carefully.

Episode Notes

8:00 – Sean Baker Reactions

19:00 – Barnes & Noble

30:00 – October Predictions

47:00 – Ghost World

1:10 – Short Takes (The Exterminating Angel, Summer Interlude, Crumb)

1:21:30 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Barnes & Noble Criterion Sale Thora Birch: How Hollywood’s Darling Disappeared Janus Films – The Human Condition Tweet Criterion Close-Up 23: Breaker Morant and Mister Johnson Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Tim Leggoe: Blog | Letterboxd | Twitter Travis Trudell: Twitter | Instagram Criterion Now: Twitter | Facebook Group Criterion Cast: Facebook | Twitter

Music for the show is from Fatboy Roberts’ Geek Remixed project.
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Journey – Filmmaker Nick Hamm Discusses His New Film

“We are Ireland. We are inevitable.”

Each summer, while the multiplexes are filled with the big spectacles and epic blockbusters, the little gems that grip us with their humor, their tragedy and their humanity, manage to find their ways into the cinemas. This year it’s The Journey, the gripping account of how two men from opposite sides of the political spectrum came together to change the course of history.

In 2006, amidst the ongoing, decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland, representatives from the two warring factions meet for negotiations. In one corner is Ian Paisley (Timothy Spall), the deeply conservative British loyalist; in the other is Martin McGuinness (Colm Meaney), a former Irish Republican Army leader who has devoted his life to the cause of Irish reunification. Opposites in every way, the two men at first seem to have little chance of ever finding common ground. But over the course of an impromptu, detour-filled car ride through the Scottish countryside, each begins to see the other less as an enemy, and more as an individual—a breakthrough that promises to at last bring peace to the troubled region.

Driven by two virtuoso central performances, The Journey is a more-relevant-than-ever reminder of how simple humanity can overcome political division. Freddie Highmore, Toby Stephens, Catherine McCormack and John Hurt co-star. (Review)

I recently spoke with the director of The Journey, award winning director Nick Hamm. Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Hamm directed cult-classic The Hole (2001), starring Thora Birch and Keira Knightley, in her feature film debut. He also helmed Lionsgate’s thriller Godsend (2004), starring Robert DeNiro, Rebecca Romijn and Greg Kinnear.

Hamm later produced and directed the 80’s U2-centric comedy, Killing Bono (2011) for Paramount Pictures and Northern Ireland Screen, starring Ben Barnes, Robert Sheehan and Pete Postelwaite.

During our discussion about his latest movie, the British director and I talked about the film’s mixture of tension and humor, the human story and the message of The Journey.

We Are Movie Geeks: The Journey is a good story that should be told – the type that audiences don’t see anymore. It opened in 2016 in Toronto and then Venice, and finally had its premiere at the Belfast Film Festival in May 2017. What was the crowd’s reaction and how was it received?

Nick Hamm: That was a really extraordinary event. I’ve seen it now with thousands of people watching the movie and if you’re going to see a movie like this, you really need to take it back to Northern Ireland to see what they make of it. In the end, that’s where the authenticity of the film is. It is important to us. The event was attended by nearly a thousand people and political leaders from both sides of the community came so we had politicians from Sinn Féin and politicians from the Democratic Unionist Party (Dup). It was a very emotional and momentous event because in many respects it reminded people of something that they had achieved and had risked losing.

We Are Movie Geeks: It is such an interesting script by writer Colin Bateman, one that is funny, sad, and dramatic. Tell me about lead actors Timothy Spall (Paisley) and Colm Meaney (McGuinness – who died recently in March) and the casting. Their characters became known as ”the Chuckle Brothers”. Both actors were very impressive to watch.

Nick Hamm: What underscores everything is the fact that Colin’s script is so good and when that happens, you attract really good actors. Both Tim and Colm were fantastic partners on the film. Tim had to transform himself – he’s playing a six foot five, Northern Irish politician when in reality he’s a five foot nine London actor. We did some prosthetics on his chin and a little aging on his hair, along with the false teeth. The hair and makeup was done by Polly McKay. Tim became the character of Paisley which was fascinating to watch and he’s one of those actors that totally transforms himself.

Colm is one of Ireland’s best actors. What was important was to find somebody who could give McGuinness sympathy. This is a man whose background is well documented. What do you do? You start by making him human, you give him a life and a backstory. When you put someone like Colm Meany in that role, Colm transforms himself for that. He understands the culture from where that character comes, he understands the basis of that character’s ideology and he understands how that character ticks. If you have that and you are a good actor – which he is, then you have a good combination. It was great to watch him.

We Are Movie Geeks: I was very pleased to see the late John Hurt in the film in what was one of his final roles.

Nick Hamm: We all knew that John was very sick while he was doing the film. When we offered him the movie, he wanted to work until the end and play the part. It was real tribute to have him involved as a part of the film.

We Are Movie Geeks: Irish writer Seamus Heaney, although not a political animal was an artist like yourself. He was affected by “The Troubles” when his cousin Colum was killed as a result of the war – Heaney moved from Northern Ireland to Southern Ireland after that. Has it affected you in any way and was this a partial reason why you made the film?

Nick Hamm: It hasn’t affected me personally but I knew people who were. Growing up I was in school in Northern Ireland and I knew people who had real problems. I could see it with my own eyes, the difficulties back then, and it was an intense situation. The vast portion of the people in Northern Ireland went on about their daily life unaffected by it. The real heroes were the people who got on with their daily lives in that situation.

The Journey for me shows how a unique political friendship was achieved at the personal cost of both men. Both men were vilified by their respective communities, but it was one of the most unique political friendships that I had ever witnessed. For two people who were so antagonistic towards each other, who ultimately came to respect each other, and became friends with each other, is why I made the movie and to tell their story.

We Are Movie Geeks: Despite technically being set in Scotland, and on a plane, The Journey was filmed in Northern Ireland. There’s no green screen and it was filmed on the road with your director of photography Greg Gardiner. What was the approach when you took it out of the plane and into the car?

Nick Hamm: This device protected the claustrophobia that the film so demanded while allowing a political version of a road movie to take place. We decided to not be frightened by the tyranny of the car but rather embrace it and enjoy the conceit. Greg and I had discussed and ultimately rejected the idea of green-screen or back-projection very early. We filmed on the road, creating a ‘mobile studio’; our own little cinematic microcosm

We Are Movie Geeks: There is one scene in particular, where McGuiness and Paisley let down their defenses somewhat, set inside a church and then out in the cemetery, that has real depth.

Nick Hamm: I think in the cemetery scene when Colm breaks down, everyone expects Paisley to be sympathetic and wrap his arms around him, but he rebuffs him and shows him no pity or sympathy. Every scene was like a boxing match with each character winning a round.

We Are Movie Geeks: I appreciated the sound editing and especially the score from Stephen Warbeck who first became known for the music for “Prime Suspect” and won an Academy Award for his score for Shakespeare in Love. It is a really nice score.

Nick Hamm: It was something quite new for him and he really had a go at it.

We Are Movie Geeks: Did you speak to the families and to some of the individuals involved? And what was their reaction?

Nick Hamm: I met McGuiness before he died. The whole film came together very quickly from the start.. From the script to the financing, it was out in about two and a half years. It’s been a very quick process and very rare for an independent film. I did sit with McGuiness before we started filming about his friendship with Paisley and it was fascinating to hear him speak how important the relationship was and how important it was that they maintained contact up to its logical conclusion. I did talk to Paisley’s family and to his son. We wanted to reassure them we were not riding roughshod over the history. But at the same time it was important to be creatively independent. We did not share the screenplay with them at any stage. In the end both families really loved the movie.

Plus Sinn Féin and the Dup (Democratic Unionist Party) really liked the film, which is almost unheard of, both parties liking the same thing never mind the same movie. The most important thing for us was that the story was balanced.

We Are Movie Geeks: Brexit is seemingly in the news all the time now. As a result, checkpoints could be set up again to control borders. The timing of the film and its release couldn’t be more relevant. Will it cause a major headache between Northern Ireland and Ireland? Will it hinder Ireland’s reunification?

Nick Hamm: The question needs to be asked and it’s a dreadful situation. The idea that there will be a border back in Ireland again, I don’t think anybody wants that. I know for a fact that the Dup doesn’t want that and it would be suicide for both the economy and the welfare of the people to start putting border checks back up. That border in Ireland runs through people’s fields and farms. It was never designed to be a hard border, which it was during “The Troubles”. It would be an unmitigated tragedy to go back to that.

We Are Movie Geeks: Speaking of Indie Films, what are your thoughts on how people see films? Many are leaving the cinemas in favor of watching a film at home or on the computers with the advent of Netflix and Hulu, etc.

Nick Hamm: I like that at the beginning of a movie’s life that it has a public screening. I think the ways a film is distributed these days is really fascinating. I don’t distinguish between how and where a movie is watched. It’s changing so quickly, in five years-time it’ll change all again. Even the act of going to a movie theater is going to change. As long as they keep putting out these huge blockbuster films, in the cinemas is the best way to watch them. However some films work better on a smaller screen. I think screen size some people can get very worked up about.

We Are Movie Geeks: What’s your next project?

Nick Hamm: We are going to do the DeLorean story, Driven. It’s through the eyes of the guy who gave him up to the FBI. We’re hoping to shoot in September in Puerto Rico. The script is from The Journey’s Colin Bateman. Jason Sudeikis, Lee Pace and Timothy Olyphant are in the picture.

Synopsis:

Driven is the turbo-charged story about the FBI sting operation to entrap maverick car designer John DeLorean.

Sudeikis stars as Jim Hoffman, a con artist-turned-informer for the FBI in the war on drugs. Olyphant plays his handler, determined to snare the world-famous but enigmatic DeLorean (Pace) — desperate for cash to finance his dream of designing the ultimate car of the future — in a drug deal that would become the most lurid celebrity scandal of the 1980s.

From IFC Films, see The Journey in theaters now.

The post The Journey – Filmmaker Nick Hamm Discusses His New Film appeared first on We Are Movie Geeks.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Emotional Naïveté of ‘Good Morning’ and Poignant Cynicism of ‘Ghost World’

Yasujirō Ozu tends to be known by reputation as a restrained, despondent dramatist — and not, regrettably, as one of the rare artists immaculately in tune with the psychology, behavior and energy of children. His 1932 silent comedy I Was Born, But... is a delectable slice of humor, humanism, and social satire, grounded by an exceptional insight into the verbal and physical language of grade-school boys and brought to life by pitch-perfect performances a cast of young actors. In Good Morning, his characteristically sedate, loose remake of the aforementioned silent film, Ozu revisits similar thematic territory from the wizened perspective of his postwar films. Now with the tools of full audio and Technicolor at his disposal, Ozu spins a social and emotional tapestry from a 1950s Tokyo suburb in which two young brothers, desperate for their own TV set, take a vow of silence in protest against the frivolous speech of adult society.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Ghost World

Daniel Clowes’ comics creation receives an A-Plus film adaptation through the directorial filter of Terry Zwigoff. The show has more going for it than the bleak alienation of disaffected quasi- gen-Xers — the script offers a depth of character revealing the insecure, hopes and fears behind all the insulting attitudes and behaviors. It’s caustic, funny and also strongly affecting.

Ghost World

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 872

2001 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date May 30, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Thora Birch, Scarlett Johansson, Steve Buscemi, Brad Renfro, Illeana Douglas, Bob Balaban, Stacey Travis, Teri Garr.

Cinematography: Affonso Beato

Production Designer: Edward T. McAvoy

Art Direction: Alan E. Muraoka

Film Editors: Carole Kravetz, Michael R. Miller

Original Music: David Kitay

Writing credits: Daniel Clowes & Terry Zwigoff from the comics by Daniel Clowes

Produced by Pippa Cross, Janette Day, Lianne Halfon, Barbara A. Hall,

John Malkovich, Russell Smith

Directed by Terry Zwigoff

Enid:
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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