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5 items from 2007


Ang Lee's The Ice Storm: From 9.99 DVD bins to Criterion treatment

21 December 2007 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- If I remember correctly, Ang Lee's The Ice Storm ranked only second in my top films of the 97' (with only the similar in seasonal setting Atom Egoyan's The Sweet Hereafter in the number one spot). I own the crappy single disc DVD that most of you have or that I've often witnessed them in the 9.99 dollar DVD bins. Get ready for the second generation edition: sweet cover box office art that the folks at Criterion Collection will unleash upon us in March of the new year. Check out the features below for the 2 disc set + the cover box art that shows the process of crystallization. - New, restored high-definition digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Ang Lee and director of photography Frederick Elmes- Audio commentary featuring Lee and producer-screenwriter James Schamus- New documentary featuring interviews with actors Joan Allen, Kevin Kline, Christina Ricci, and »

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Lipsky to head SenArt unit

2 November 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Producer SenArt Films is creating a distribution division, SenArt Films Releasing, and hiring New York indie film veteran Jeff Lipsky as its director of marketing distribution.

20th Century Fox Home Entertainment has signed on as its video releasing partner.

Lipsky, co-founder of October Films and Lot 47 Films, will oversee the arm's first U.S. release, Christopher N. Rowley's road movie Bonneville, starring Jessica Lange, Joan Allen and Kathy Bates. SenArt founder Robert May and John Kilker produced the project. Lightning Entertainment is handling overseas sales at this week's American Film Market.

Fox is a financial partner with SenArt, collaborating on its overall marketing strategy, encompassing theatrical and DVD releases.

"In this age of niche marketing, we are pioneering what we call 'hyper-viral marketing,'" May said. "We'll identify a film's target demographic -- in this case, the underserved female boomer audience -- and then find brands and organizations who are targeting the same demo and set up innovative cross-promotional partnerships." »

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Buckle up: Allen joins Uni's 'Race'

8 August 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Joan Allen, hot off of Universal Pictures' The Bourne Ultimatum, is returning to the studio for Death Race, Paul W.S. Anderson's remake of the Roger Corman cult classic. Ian McShane and Tyrese Gibson also are buckling up for the action thriller, which Jason Statham is toplining.

Death Race sees a future America in which prison inmates are forced to brutally compete in an enclosed arena. Statham will play a prisoner who, with only weeks to go before his release, is coerced into being a driver and becomes the crowd favorite called Frankenstein.

Allen will play the warden of the prison who runs the race and ruthlessly forces Statham to enter the arena. McShane will play a coach, while Gibson is a sociopathic racer named Machine Gun Joe who seeks to escape from prison.

Production will start this year with an aim for a fall 2008 release.

Tom Cruise and Paula Wagner are producing via their C/W Prods. as well as Anderson and his Impact Pictures partner Jeremy Bolt. »

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The Bourne Ultimatum

3 August 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This review was written for the theatrical release of "The Bourne Ultimatum"."The Bourne Ultimatum", the culminating film of the trilogy begun five years ago with "The Bourne Identity", gets under way with a burst of nervous energy and extreme urgency and never lets up. It's a 114-minute chase film, dashing through streets and rooftops of any number of international urban sprawls with Matt Damon's redoubtable Jason Bourne hot on the trail of -- himself. That might be the genius of the series: A James Bond-like character who can escape any pickle and thwart any villain, but all in a quest for his own identity. Jason is not out to save the world -- though he might do that -- he'd just like to know his real name.

Director Paul Greengrass, who only made the astonishing "United 93" in the interim, returns for his second "Bourne" film (after 2004's "The Bourne Supremacy") to bring the roller coaster ride to an end in a dead heat where all the plot points and (surviving) characters of the three films converge. Audiences will eat it up: This is a postmillennial spy-action movie pitched to a large international audience. You hardly need subtitles.

Article Templatehttp://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1119669402http://www.brightcove.com/channel.jsp?channel=769341148 var config = new Array();config["videoId"] = 1135484455;config["lineupId"] = null;config["videoRef"] = null;config["playerTag"] = null;config["autoStart"] = false;config["preloadBackColor"] = "#FFFFFF";config["width"] = 286; config["height"] = 277; config["playerId"] = 1119669402; createExperience(config, 8); The cool thing about this movie is that the real revenge is not against bad guys in the CIA, but against the high-tech world that maddens mere mortals. Your mobile phone drops calls? Your car needs towing after a parking-lot fender-bender? Well, Jason can switch phones and patch into the world from trains, subways, stairwells and undergrounds. Any car he steals leaps up sharp inclines, plunges off of roofs or smashes into other vehicles until reduced to smoldering metal yet can still outrace any car on the block.

And his body! Blow it up with a bomb, expose it to brutal hand-to-hand combat or throw it into the East River, and it gets up with a few manly scratches.Yes, there are a few plot holes. But few are likely to care. A smart cast of veteran actors gives the film just enough emotional heft to carry you through the silliness. Damon has definitely made Bourne his own. For all his physical dexterity and killing instincts, Damon brings a Hamlet-like quality to the CIA-trained assassin suffering from a five-year spell of amnesia who can never quite tell who his friends are, or rather, which of his enemies might be a true friend.

Joan Allen returns as the CIA investigator who has slowly come to see that Jason might be the real deal. And Julia Stiles as an in-over-her-head agent again shows up for no credible reason other than the producers want her back. (They're right.)

Newcomers include a flinty and increasingly antsy David Strathairn as a head of a black-ops program that has its real-life model in all the extralegal programs sponsored by the current administration. At one point, he declares "you can't make this stuff up," and you know the filmmakers are nodding toward today's Washington.

Scott Glenn appears as a law-ignoring CIA director, though he might remind you more of the current attorney general, and Albert Finney crops up toward at the end as a Dr. Mengele figure behind a behavior-mod program that created any number of Jason Bournes.

The movie swings through Moscow (filched from the previous film); Paris; Turin, Italy; London; Madrid; Tangiers, Morocco; and New York as Jason Hones in on who did this to him. (That's another thing -- he never has to endure airport security checks!)

A fatigue factor sets in somewhere; it might vary from person to person. Yet the sharp intelligence behind the screenplay by Tony Gilroy, Scott Z. Burns and George Nolfi (though other hands reportedly contributed) gives the plot, salvaged from the Robert Ludlum Cold War spy novel, a genuine buoyancy. The film is trying to get at something, no matter how crudely, about corruption within the American espionage system, with its secret reliance on renditions and torture in the name of freedom. This might not be the best way to illustrate the problem with credibility-stretchers at every turn. But then again, how many people look at documentaries?

Greengrass tops himself with each passing minute by staging terrific stunts and chases through crowded streets, buildings and rooftops. Cinematographer Oliver Wood and editor Christopher Rouse gives the film its lightning speed and jagged edges with a close, hand-held camera and quick edits while John Powell's score pulsates pure adrenaline.

THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures in association with MP Beta Prods. presents a Kennedy/Marshall production in association with Ludlum Entertainment

Credits:

Director: Paul Greengrass

Screenwriters: Tony Gilroy, Scott Z. Burns, George Nolfi

Screen story: Tony Gilroy

Based on the novel by: Robert Ludlum

Producers: Frank Marshall, Patrick Crowley, Paul L. Sandberg

Executive producers: Jeffrey M. Weiner, Henry Morrison, Doug Liman

Director of photography: Oliver Wood

Production designer: Peter Wenham

Costume designer: Shay Cunliffe

Music: John Powell

Editor: Christopher Rouse

Cast:

Jason Bourne: Matt Damon

Nicky Parsons: Julia Stiles

Noah Vosen: David Strathairn

Ezra Kramer: Scott Glenn

Sam Ross: Paddy Considine

Paz: Edgar Romeriz

Pamela: Joan Allen

Dr. Hirsch: Albert Finney

Running time -- 114 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13 »

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The Bourne Ultimatum

25 July 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Bourne Ultimatum, the culminating film of the trilogy begun five years ago with The Bourne Identity, gets under way with a burst of nervous energy and extreme urgency and never lets up. It's a 114-minute chase film, dashing through streets and rooftops of any number of international urban sprawls with Matt Damon's redoubtable Jason Bourne hot on the trail of -- himself. That might be the genius of the series: A James Bond-like character who can escape any pickle and thwart any villain, but all in a quest for his own identity. Jason is not out to save the world -- though he might do that -- he'd just like to know his real name.

Director Paul Greengrass, who only made the astonishing United 93 in the interim, returns for his second Bourne film (after 2004's The Bourne Supremacy) to bring the roller coaster ride to an end in a dead heat where all the plot points and (surviving) characters of the three films converge. Audiences will eat it up: This is a postmillennial spy-action movie pitched to a large international audience. You hardly need subtitles.

The cool thing about this movie is that the real revenge is not against bad guys in the CIA, but against the high-tech world that maddens mere mortals. Your mobile phone drops calls? Your car needs towing after a parking-lot fender-bender? Well, Jason can switch phones and patch into the world from trains, subways, stairwells and undergrounds. Any car he steals leaps up sharp inclines, plunges off of roofs or smashes into other vehicles until reduced to smoldering metal yet can still outrace any car on the block.

And his body! Blow it up with a bomb, expose it to brutal hand-to-hand combat or throw it into the East River, and it gets up with a few manly scratches.

Yes, there are a few plot holes. But few are likely to care. A smart cast of veteran actors gives the film just enough emotional heft to carry you through the silliness. Damon has definitely made Bourne his own. For all his physical dexterity and killing instincts, Damon brings a Hamlet-like quality to the CIA-trained assassin suffering from a five-year spell of amnesia who can never quite tell who his friends are, or rather, which of his enemies might be a true friend.

Joan Allen returns as the CIA investigator who has slowly come to see that Jason might be the real deal. And Julia Stiles as an in-over-her-head agent again shows up for no credible reason other than the producers want her back. (They're right.)

Newcomers include a flinty and increasingly antsy David Strathairn as a head of a black-ops program that has its real-life model in all the extralegal programs sponsored by the current administration. At one point, he declares "you can't make this stuff up," and you know the filmmakers are nodding toward today's Washington.

Scott Glenn appears as a law-ignoring CIA director, though he might remind you more of the current attorney general, and Albert Finney crops up toward at the end as a Dr. Mengele figure behind a behavior-mod program that created any number of Jason Bournes.

The movie swings through Moscow (filched from the previous film); Paris; Turin, Italy; London; Madrid; Tangiers, Morocco; and New York as Jason Hones in on who did this to him. (That's another thing -- he never has to endure airport security checks!)

A fatigue factor sets in somewhere; it might vary from person to person. Yet the sharp intelligence behind the screenplay by Tony Gilroy, Scott Z. Burns and George Nolfi (though other hands reportedly contributed) gives the plot, salvaged from the Robert Ludlum Cold War spy novel, a genuine buoyancy. The film is trying to get at something, no matter how crudely, about corruption within the American espionage system, with its secret reliance on renditions and torture in the name of freedom. This might not be the best way to illustrate the problem with credibility-stretchers at every turn. But then again, how many people look at documentaries?

Greengrass tops himself with each passing minute by staging terrific stunts and chases through crowded streets, buildings and rooftops. Cinematographer Oliver Wood and editor Christopher Rouse gives the film its lightning speed and jagged edges with a close, hand-held camera and quick edits while John Powell's score pulsates pure adrenaline.

THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures in association with MP Beta Prods. presents a Kennedy/Marshall production in association with Ludlum Entertainment

Credits:

Director: Paul Greengrass

Screenwriters: Tony Gilroy, Scott Z. Burns, George Nolfi

Screen story: Tony Gilroy

Based on the novel by: Robert Ludlum

Producers: Frank Marshall, Patrick Crowley, Paul L. Sandberg

Executive producers: Jeffrey M. Weiner, Henry Morrison, Doug Liman

Director of photography: Oliver Wood

Production designer: Peter Wenham

Costume designer: Shay Cunliffe

Music: John Powell

Editor: Christopher Rouse

Cast:

Jason Bourne: Matt Damon

Nicky Parsons: Julia Stiles

Noah Vosen: David Strathairn

Ezra Kramer: Scott Glenn

Sam Ross: Paddy Considine

Paz: Edgar Romeriz

Pamela: Joan Allen

Dr. Hirsch: Albert Finney

Running time -- 114 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

»

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5 items from 2007


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