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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001

18 items from 2016


Best Shot: Queen Margot (1994)

17 May 2016 6:01 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Hit Me With Your Best Shot: Queen Margot (1994)

Director: Patrice Chereau. Cinematography: Phillipe Rousselot. 

Starring: Isabelle Adjani, Daniel Auteuil, Vincent Perez, Jean-Hugues Anglade, and Virna Lisi 

Awards: 2 Cannes jury prizes, 5 César Awards, 1 Oscar nomination.

They say that death always takes your lovers..."

When I was young and extremely sexually naive, let's say hypothetically in High School French class, I was startled to discover that the French phrase "La petite mort," which translates literally to 'the little death' referred to a sexual orgasm. I had no idea why these two towers of Human Obsession, Sex and Death, would be linked up like twins. But the movies, ever the personal tutor for young cinephiles, kept forcing the connections.

Which brings us to the decadent, opulent, erotic, violent and visceral 16th century French epic Queen Margot, this week's Best Shot subject. (The shot choices are after the jump due to the graphic nature of the film. »

- NATHANIEL R

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"Best Shot" Schedule for May

14 May 2016 5:07 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

'Here's what's coming up the rest of this month on Best Shot if you'd like to join us. It's easy. You...

1) watch the movie

2) pick a shot, post it and say why you love it

3) let us know you did via twitter, email or comments and we link up 

May 17th Queen Margot (1994)

Madwoman Isabelle Adjani stars in this blood-soaked, erotically-charged 16th century French epic which we figured is a great fit for a Cannes heavy week (the film won two prizes in its year including Best Actress for its unforgettable supporting actress Virna Lisi). Plus the last time we did an Adjani (The Story of Adele H) the articles were hot. Please join us if you haven't seen this one! [Streaming on Netflix]

May 24th Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)

We pushed this back a month since it wasn't yet available to rent but it's time to revisit future jedi Rey as »

- NATHANIEL R

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Isabelle Huppert: ‘When I act, I don't think about anything’

21 April 2016 10:51 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Famous for immersing herself in challenging roles, the French actor plays a war photographer in her latest film Louder Than Bombs. She talks about her commitment to directors, acting with Gerard Depardieu and playing a woman who stalks her rapist

Isabelle Huppert strides into the salon, full of pep and vinegar, as you would expect. “Right now, I am completely immersed in theatre,” she says, not especially apologetically. “That’s why I might sound a little asleep at times.” It’s true: she is midway through a two-month Paris run of Phaedra(s), the classical Greek tragedy as reinterpreted by Sarah “Blasted” Kane, Wajdi Mouawad and Jm Coetzee. “It is a very demanding production,” she says, and you wouldn’t want to doubt her.

But she doesn’t sound in the remotest bit asleep. One of Huppert’s principal attributes, and one that has served her brilliantly as an actor over the decades, »

- Andrew Pulver

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Isabelle Huppert: ‘When I act, I don't think about anything’

21 April 2016 10:51 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Famous for immersing herself in challenging roles, the French actor plays a war photographer in her latest film Louder Than Bombs. She talks about her commitment to directors, acting with Gerard Depardieu and playing a woman who stalks her rapist

Isabelle Huppert strides into the salon, full of pep and vinegar, as you would expect. “Right now, I am completely immersed in theatre,” she says, not especially apologetically. “That’s why I might sound a little asleep at times.” It’s true: she is midway through a two-month Paris run of Phaedra(s), the classical Greek tragedy as reinterpreted by Sarah “Blasted” Kane, Wajdi Mouawad and Jm Coetzee. “It is a very demanding production,” she says, and you wouldn’t want to doubt her.

But she doesn’t sound in the remotest bit asleep. One of Huppert’s principal attributes, and one that has served her brilliantly as an actor over the decades, »

- Andrew Pulver

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Edinburgh Film Festival Celebrates Cinéma du Look, Comic-Strip Adaptations

15 April 2016 11:39 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Thirty years since the Edinburgh Film Festival opened with the U.K. premiere of Jean-Jacques Beineix’s “Betty Blue,” the fest is to devote one of its retrospectives to the Cinéma du Look wave of 1980 and early 1990s French filmmaking. Another retrospective, “Pow!!! Live Action Comic-Strip Adaptations: The First Generation,” delves into the evolution of the live-action comic-strip adaptation in cinema.

The Gallic retro will focus on the work of Beineix, Luc Besson and Leos Carax, the three directors around which Cinéma Du Look revolved. Titles in the strand will include Beineix’s “Betty Blue” (1986) and “Diva” (1981), Besson’s “Subway” (1985), “The Big Blue” (1988) and “La Femme Nikita” (1990), and Carax’s “Mauvais Sang” (1986) and “Les Amants Du Pont-Neuf” (1991).

The films showcase performances by Jean Reno, Christophe Lambert, Michel Piccoli, Isabelle Adjani, Juliette Binoche, Jeanne Moreau, Dominique Pinon and Julie Delpy. Several of the stars will attend the festival, which is headed by Mark Adams. »

- Leo Barraclough

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Power and Resistance: Andrzej Żuławski’s "On the Silver Globe"

28 March 2016 3:42 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

“There is in every one of us, even those who seem to be most moderate, a type of desire that is terrible, wild, and lawless.”—The Republic, Book IX 572bWhat’s the best way to describe the mania of an Andrzej Żuławski film? William Grimes, eulogizing Żuławski for The New York Times chose “emotionally savage.” J. Hoberman used “hyperkinetic,” “frenzied,” and “‘awful’ in its root sense of inspiring dread. Daniel Bird, writing about the most recent Lincoln Center screenings in New York, chose “deeply disturbing.” These descriptors make perfect sense after experiencing a Żuławski film, but I’ve never been able to sell his films to a newcomer this way. How could I? They’re much too primal for adjectives in our delicate English language, crafted to communicate Enlightenment-era ideas in a pleasing series of vibrations. The intensity of this director’s films could only be described in some sort of ancient Lovecraftian squelching, »

- Zach Lewis

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Writing’s On the Wall: Close-Up on Andrzej Żuławski’s "Possession"

11 March 2016 11:47 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Possession is playing March 12 - April 11, 2016 in the United States.In and out, my mind goesIn and out, he goesTo show me it’s cruelMy trust in youBerlin is drowning me— “Drowning in Berlin,” MobilesIt begins on foot, and ends in the heavens. On 13 February 2014, I took a night off from watching films at the Berlin Film Festival and rode the U-Bahn to Moritzplatz. Between 1961 and 1990, when the German capital was divided, Moritzplatz was one of several stations known as the last in West Berlin: after passing through it, trains proceeded through a succession of ‘ghost stations’ located within (and under) Gdr terrain, not stopping again until the line re-emerged on the ‘more democratic’ side of the Berlin Wall.Above ground, it’s less than 300 feet from Moritzplatz to the corner of Sebastianstrasse and Luckauer Strasse: location of »

- Michael Pattison

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Malgré la nuit | 2016 Film Comment Selects Review

25 February 2016 10:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

When the Night Has Come: Grandrieux Laments Lost Love

Seven years have passed since provocateur Philippe Grandrieux’s 2008 film Un Lac, and he remains somewhat of an acquired taste, though considering the subject matter, Malgré la nuit (Despite the Night) is surprisingly less galvanizing than his early features. The narrative, should we indeed call it thus, couldn’t be more simple, roughly concerning a British bloke returning to Paris to reconnect with his lost love. His reasons for leaving or returning aren’t apparently of importance once he disappears into a sort of Parisian ether, where passionate memories are pierced by a current state of abject degradation upon reconnecting with his troubled object of affection. The take away is more of a cerebral, extrasensory experience, existing as a diluted nightmare where pleasure and punishment are doled out in equal measure, which is hardly a surprise for those accustomed to Grandrieux’s filmography. »

- Nicholas Bell

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Rosamund Pike pays tribute to two cult horror classics in bizarre new video

23 February 2016 12:58 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Weirdly, Massive Attack's new music video for their track "Voodoo in My Blood" (feat. Scottish hip-hop group Young Fathers) merges imagery from two cult horror films I've recently written about: Don Coscarelli's Phantasm (included on my Watchlist of 5 great telekinesis movies, viewable above) and the late Andrzej Zulawski's Possession, which features a legendary subway meltdown from French actress Isabelle Adjani. Coincidence?  The clip stars Gone Girl's Rosamund Pike, whose long-sleeved blue dress is an obvious tribute to the one Adjani wore in Possession, and it was directed by Ringan Ledwidge, who obviously has a thing for the spinning, deadly silver spheres Coscarelli dreamed up for his bizarro 1979 classic. It's a fascinating video, tailor-made for lovers of cult horror cinema. Watch it below. »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Hollywood Hallelujah: Expect a Wave of Faith-Based Movies This Year

18 February 2016 5:01 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Amid the onslaught of superhero films coming our way this year is an equally big wave of faith-based films — movies in a genre that studios presumably see potential in since Sony’s successful Christian film “War Room” last summer. This weekend marks the opening of “Risen,” which tells the story of the Resurrection through the eyes of a non- believer. Starring Joseph Fiennes and Tom Felton, “Risen” is first of several faith-based films going wide this year. Others include “The Young Messiah” (March 11) with Sean Bean and Isabelle Adjani; “Ben-Hur,” the remake of the 1959 classic directed by Timur »

- Beatrice Verhoeven

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R.I.P. Andrzej Zulawksi: Watch the legendary scene from 'Possession' that came to define his career

17 February 2016 4:21 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Polish director Andrzej ?u?awski -- who died today in Warsaw at the age of 75 -- directed a total of 13 feature films over his lifetime, winning acclaim and some popular success in his native Europe but never really penetrating the American consciousness. And yet among art house audiences and many critics Zulawski was an important filmmaker, helming such bizarre, controversial films as 1972's The Devil (1972) -- which was banned by Communist authorities in his native country and didn't see release there until 1988 -- and The Public Woman, which nabbed him a nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay at the 1985 César Awards (a.k.a. the French Oscars). Despite Zulawski's many accomplishments, his best-known film by far is the surreal 1981 cult horror film Possession, which features as its centerpiece a legendary subway meltdown by Isabelle Adjani that has since gone down as one of the most primal, wrenching moments of performance insanity »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Andrzej Zulawski, Polish Director, Dies at 75

17 February 2016 12:53 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Andrzej Zulawski, a Polish director who spent most of his professional life in France after irking the Communist government at home, died Feb. 17 after a long struggle with cancer. He was 75.

Zulawski was known for an idiosyncratic approach to storytelling and films characterized by “explosions of violence, sexuality, and despair,” according to website Culture.pl, which also noted that “the vision of the world portrayed in his films has been described as tragic, shocking and hysterical”; his methods yielded from actresses including Romy Schneider, Isabelle Adjani and Sophie Marceau some of the best performances of their careers.

Zulawski’s son Xawery, himself a film director, wrote on Facebook late Tuesday that his father was “terminally ill with cancer and undergoing intensive therapy in hospital in Poland.”

Zulawski had not made a film in more than a decade until coming out with “Cosmos,” which starred Sabine Azema and won best director »

- Carmel Dagan

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Daily | Andrzej Zulawski, 1940 – 2016

17 February 2016 4:26 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Le Monde is among the many French papers reporting today that Polish director and novelist Andrzej Zulawski passed away last night, succumbing at the age of 75 to his battle with cancer. Just yesterday, news broke that Kino Lorber would be bringing Cosmos, Zulawski's first feature in 15 years, which premiered last year in Locarno, where it won the best director award, and has just screened in Berlin's Critics' Week, to the Us. During his years in France, Zulawski worked with the likes of Romy Schneider, Isabelle Adjani and Sophie Marceau. J. Hoberman in the New York Times: "His movies are seldom more than a step from some flaming abyss, with his actors (and audience) trembling on the edge." » - David Hudson »

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Andrzej Zulawski’s ‘Cosmos’ Acquired By Kino Lorber; Film Movement Nabs ‘The Ardennes’

16 February 2016 8:49 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Kino Lorber has acquired North American rights to Cosmos, the first feature film in 15 years from Polish director Andrzej Żuławski, whose horror pic Possession starring Sam Neill and Isabelle Adjani played at Cannes in 1981. The indie distributor plans a theatrical release this summer before a VOD rollout in the fall. Adapted by Witold Gombrowicz’s absurdist novel, Cosmos centers on Witold (Jonathan Genet), who has just failed the bar, and his companion Fuchs (Johan… »

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Maiwenn on the rocky road of romance by Richard Mowe

20 January 2016 8:23 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Director in action: Maiwenn (right) with Emmanuelle Bercot and Vincent Cassel during the shoot of Mon Roi Photo: Unifrance

French actress, writer and director Maiwenn has been in the business from an early age appearing as a child in several films including One Deadly Summer with Isabelle Adjani. She was only 16 when she was involved in a relationship with producer and director Luc Besson with whom she had a daughter, Shanna. She spent time living in Hollywood and appearing in Besson’s Léon and The Fifth Element. Her break-up with Besson at 21 marked a return to living and working in France where she has become known simply by her Christian name (surname Lo Besco which her sister Isild, also an actress and director, uses). Maiwenn had a second child, Diego, with property developer Jean-Yves Le Fur before they split up. In 2006 she directed her semi-autobiographical first feature Pardon Me followed in 2011 by Polisse, »

- Richard Mowe

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5 Things to Know About Gabriel Day-Lewis, the Gorgeous Model-Musician Son of Daniel

12 January 2016 2:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

His father is a world-famous three-time Oscar winner, but these days, Gabriel-Kane Day-Lewis is making a name for himself. He's just 20 years old, but in the past year, the son of Daniel Day-Lewis and French actress Isabelle Adjani has turned heads on the runway, released his first single and proved he's a mandatory follow on Instagram. What else do you need to know about him? 1. He and his famous father share a love for inkThese two don't just share a strong jawline: While Dad has tattoos of two handprints, a mermaid and a compass dotting his arms, Gabriel-Kane favors birds, »

- Diana Pearl, @dianapearl_

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Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2016: #41. Gustave Kervern & Benoit Delepine’s Saint Amour

10 January 2016 3:00 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Saint Amour

Directors: Gustave Kervern, Benoit Delepine

Writers: Gustave Kervern, Benoit Delepine

Eclectic Belgian directing duo Gustave Kervern and Benoit Delepine have created a variety of bizarre scenarios together ever since their 2004 debut Aaltra. Notable titles also included 2010’s Mammuth starring Gerard Depardieu and Isabelle Adjani, as well as their not-to-be-missed 2012 title Le Grand Soir, which won the top prize out of Directors’ Fortnight. In Venice 2014, they unveiled Near Death Experience while Kervern has been appearing on other French projects in front of the camera, opposite Catherine Deneuve in In the Courtyard (2014) as well as 2015’s delightfully offbeat Ashphalte from Samuel Benchetrit (unveiled out of competition at Cannes). They often recycle the same cast mates in their feature, and a few of them populate their next feature, Saint Amour (previously known as The Wine Route), with leads Depardieu and Benoit Poelvoorde (The Brand New Testament; 3 Hearts) as father and son »

- Nicholas Bell

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'Cage aux Folles' Actor and French Academy Award Winner Featured in More Than 200 Films Dead at 93

4 January 2016 6:35 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Michel Galabru (right) and Louis de Funès in 'Le gendarme et les gendarmettes.' 'La Cage aux Folles' actor Michel Galabru dead at 93 Michel Galabru, best known internationally for his role as a rabidly reactionary politician in the comedy hit La Cage aux Folles, died in his sleep today, Jan. 4, '16, in Paris. The Moroccan-born Galabru (Oct. 27, 1922, in Safi) was 93. Throughout his nearly seven-decade career, Galabru was seen in more than 200 films – or, in his own words, “182 days,” as he was frequently cast in minor roles that required only a couple of days of work. He also appeared on stage, training at the Comédie Française and studying under film and stage veteran Louis Jouvet (Bizarre Bizarre, Quai des Orfèvres), and was featured in more than 70 television productions. Michel Galabru movies Michel Galabru's film debut took place in Maurice de Canonge's La bataille du feu (“The Battle of Fire, »

- Andre Soares

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001

18 items from 2016


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