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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 32 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


AmDocs to Honor Joe Berlinger With Special Award and Retrospective

10 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It's looking more and more like acclaimed documentarian Joe Berlinger will be the star of this year's American Documentary Film Festival (AmDocs). Not only will Berlinger's latest film, "Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru," open the festival on March 31, but AmDocs will honor the filmmaker with this year's Seeing The Bigger Picture Award. Past winners of the award include Oliver Stone, Peter Coyote, Harvey Weinstein and Peter Bogdanovich. Read More: Joe Berlinger on Michael Moore and The Changing Market for Documentaries "Joe Berlinger, whose new film is the Opening Night feature for the festival’s Fifth Anniversary Edition, has quite an impressive body of work," said Ted Grouya, AmDocs Founder and Festival Director, in an official statement. "Joe is one of today's most important auteurs in the world of documentary film, and we are thrilled to be able to honor him at this year’s festival." To commemorate Berlinger further, »

- Zack Sharf

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[Sundance Review] Equity

17 hours ago | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There were many great films about strong women at this year’s Sundance – Kelly Reichardt’s Certain Women and Antonio CamposChristine to name two of the festival’s best features in their own right. Meera Menon’s Equity, a female-driven (written, directed, produced) corporate thriller set in the cut-throat workplace of Manhattan high finance, is a solid addition to this camp, although with nothing of the style or verve of either of those pictures.

The film sets itself up as a women-centric Wall Street, as Anna Gunn’s Naomi Bishop emulates Gordon Gekko’s speech to a crowd of female grad students in one of the film’s opening scenes that she works because “she likes money.” Coming from a poor background, money pays for her brother’s education, or jewelry for herself, but she is a banker also about winning the game – although who she’s playing is a matter of contention. »

- Ed Frankl

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Channing Tatum, Joseph Gordon-Levitt Starring in Musical Comedy for Universal

5 February 2016 1:08 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Channing Tatum and Joseph Gordon-Levitt will star in an untitled musical comedy for Universal.

The studio outbid rivals in acquiring an untitled pitch for the project, based on an original idea from Michael Bacall and  Gordon-Levitt. Bacall will write the screenplay.

Marc Platt and Adam Siegel will produce for Marc Platt Productions alongside Tatum, Reid Carolin and Peter Kiernan for their Free Association company and Gordon-Levitt for hitRECord Films.

Bacall wrote the screenplays for the “21 Jump Street” movies, which starred Tatum and Jonah Hill. Gordon-Levitt starred in Bacall’s first film, “Manic.”

Tatum most recently starred in Quentin Tarantino’s “The Hateful Eight” and in Universal-Working Title’s “Hail, Caesar!” He is in pre-production on Fox’s “Gambit.”

Gordon-Levitt most recently starred in “The Night Before” and will be seen in May in Open Road’s “Snowden,” directed by Oliver Stone. He’s developing “Fraggle Rock” at New Regency and “In Sight” at Universal, »

- Dave McNary

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Universal’s Untitled Musical Comedy Finds Its Leads In Channing Tatum And Joseph Gordon-Levitt

5 February 2016 11:23 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Following a heated bidding war, Universal has snatched up rights for a new, as-yet-untitled musical comedy, with The Hollywood Reporter learning that the studio has already cast two prominent stars in Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Hail, Caesar! star Channing Tatum.

Reports indicate that the concept for the new project first came to light under Gordon-Levitt, who will produce via his hitRECord Films banner. Other talent involved at this early stage include producers Marc Platt and Adam Siegel, along with Channing Tatum himself, Reid Carolin and Peter Kiernan on behalf of Free Association. Details are scarce as to which direction Universal is steering the untitled project, and whether it’s being eyed as a potential franchise in the vein of the studio’s lucrative Pitch Perfect.

Aside from showcasing their musical (read: miming) talents on Spike’s popular Lip Sync Battle, Gordon-Levitt and Tatum first starred opposite one another in Iraq war drama Stop-Loss in 2008. Since then, »

- Michael Briers

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The Great Digital Film Festival: Quentin Tarantino's 10 Greatest Female Characters

5 February 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

All you need for a movie is a gun and a girl.”

Quentin Tarantino took Jean-Luc Godard’s quote to heart, populating his blood-splattered films with some of the most iconic female characters in the last twenty-five years. There’s almost always a female lead or, at the very least, a villain.

Quentin's next movie, The Hateful Eight, isn't any different. Early press for the film has raved about Jennifer Jason Leigh and her performance as Daisy Domergue. So get ready for Tarantino’s eighth film with “Bang Bang” byNancy Sinatra and a celebration of the badass babes that have defined Quentin Tarantino’s filmography.

Who is Tarantino’s greatest female character?

 

 

10. Honey Bunny (Amanda Plummer) - Pulp Fiction

Amanda Plummer’s Honey Bunny is a watered down version of the Mallory Knox (Juliette Lewis) in Oliver Stone’s Tarantino-penned crime satire, Natural Born Killers. Honey Bunny isn’t quite »

- Sasha James

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Sun Valley Film Festival Slate Features 'The Man Who Knew Infinity,' 'I Saw the Light' (Exclusive)

5 February 2016 5:20 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

This year's lineup also includes several favorites from the festival circuit, such as Trey Edward Shults' 2015 SXSW prizewinner "Krisha," Joachim Trier's Cannes competition entry "Louder Than Bombs," Don Cheadle's Miles Davis biopic "Miles Ahead," and popular Sundance 2016 selection "The Fits." Sony Pictures Classics' delayed "I Saw the Light," starring Tom Hiddleston as Hank Williams, will close the festival in advance of its March 25 theatrical release. Read More: "Tiff: In Defense of the Conventional Movie, from 'Spotlight' to 'The Man Who Knew Infinity'"   In addition to screening more than 60 films in all, Svff will see the return of the festival's popular Coffee Talks with industry insiders, including filmmaker Oliver Stone — recipient of the 2016 Svff Lifetime Vision Award — as well as a Screenwriters Lab led by Mark Duplass and Nat Faxon. Additional »

- Matt Brennan

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Watch: Josh Brolin on His 'Christ-Like' Character in the Coen Brothers' 'Hail, Caesar!' (Exclusive)

1 February 2016 12:32 PM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Josh Brolin, like his "Hail, Caesar!" co-star George Clooney, came into his own as a movie star after years of trudging through less than fab B fare. Brolin credits his mid-career turnaround to Robert Rodriguez on "Grindhouse" which led to the Coen brothers and Oscar-winner "No Country for Old Men" and "True Grit." Brolin has been on a roll (with the occasional "Jonah Hex") ever since, shooting Gus Van Sant's "Milk" (landing a supporting actor nom), Oliver Stone's "W" and "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,"  and Woody Allen's "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger." Brolin is a chiseled American actor who boasts that rare combination: dangerous masculinity and sexy vulnerability. He plays both villains and lovers—see Jason Reitman's sexy "Labor Day." He played a cop with a flat top in Paul Thomas Anderson's "Inherent Vice," and 2015 brought strong turns »

- Anne Thompson

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The 33 review – historic rescue minus the drama

31 January 2016 12:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Cod Latino accents don’t help this lacklustre account of the 2010 rescue of 33 trapped Chilean miners

Patricia Riggen’s pedestrian true-story film about 33 men trapped in Chile’s San José mine in 2010 is told through a melange of cod accents, with Irish Gabriel Byrne, French Juliette Binoche and American Bob Gunton all doing non-specific Latino-inflected English. Antonio Banderas and Lou Diamond Phillips make solid fists of their roles as Mario Sepúlveda and Don Lucho, pulling the disparate team together when disaster strikes. Meanwhile, Riggen methodically juxtaposes crises above and below ground level, the only stylistic surprise being a scene that recalls a hallucinatory moment from Oliver Stone’s wholly superior World Trade Center.

Continue reading »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Open Road Films Promotes Sophie Cassidy to Svp of Production, Acquisitions

29 January 2016 12:46 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Open Road Films has promoted Sophie Cassidy to senior VP of production and acquisitions, it was announced Friday by Open Road CEO Tom Ortenberg. Cassidy, who previously served as VP of production and acquisitions, joined Open Road in 2014.  She has been part of the team acquiring and producing such projects as John Hillcoat‘s heist thriller “Triple 9,” Open Road’s first production “Sleepless Night” starring Jamie Foxx, Garry Marshall‘s star-studded comedy “Mother’s Day,” Oliver Stone‘s “Snowden” and the comedy “50 Shades of Black” starring Marlon Wayans, as well as Sundance acquisition “Dope,” the acclaimed box office hit “Nightcrawler” starring Jake. »

- Jeff Sneider

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Sophie Cassidy Upped To Svp Post At Open Road

29 January 2016 10:52 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Open Road Films has promoted Sophie Cassidy to the role of Svp Production and Acquisitions, tasked with filling the role until recently held by Peter Lawson, who exited the company earlier this week. Cassidy, previously VP Production & Acquisitions, joined Open Road in 2014 and was part of Lawson’s team acquiring and producing the likes of John Hillcoat's Triple 9, Mother’s Day, Oliver Stone’s Snowden and the spoof comedy 50 Shades Of Black which hit theaters in previews… »

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The Critical Test Facing a Former Relativity Division

27 January 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

From the ashes of the Relativity Media bankruptcy comes … Critical Content. That’s the new moniker for the Relativity Television division that was acquired in October by Relativity’s major creditors as part of the parent company’s bankruptcy brawl last fall.

Critical CEO Tom Forman and president Andrew Marcus have spent the past three months re-engineering operations after the detachment from Relativity. The process has been greased by a $75 million equity influx from the new owners, led by Anchorage Capital. Although Anchorage is a major investor in MGM, there are no plans to meld Critical with the Lion’s television operations.

“We have been plotting out plans for 2016 and 2017, and figuring out how we’re going to deploy a tremendous amount of capital,” Forman said.

Among the priorities for Critical is revving up its scripted series development. In the past few weeks, the company has set up a drama »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Open Road’s Peter Lawson to Depart Following ‘Spotlight’ Success

26 January 2016 6:59 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

With the Sundance Film Festival in full swing, Open Road Films has announced that acquisitions chief Peter Lawson will leave at the end of February.

“We thank Peter for his contributions at Open Road and wish him the best with his endeavors,” said a spokesperson.

Lawson’s chief accomplishment during his two-year tenure as exec VP of acquisitions was bringing in “Spotlight,” which has been nominated for six Academy Awards including best picture, best director, best supporting actor, best supporting actress and best original screenplay.

Open Road co-financed and co-produced “Spotlight” with Participant Media after acquiring U.S. rights to the drama. The movie has grossed $33 million in the U.S. since its Nov. 6 release.

Lawson came to Open Road in 2014 during Sundance following stints at Thunder Road Pictures and the Weinstein Co. Open Road’s first major acquisition came at Cannes when it bought rights to Jake Gyllenhaal’s “Nightcrawler, »

- Dave McNary

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Arnold Schwarzenegger Updates 'Conan' Sequel Plans

26 January 2016 12:00 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

In answer to the question, "What is best in life?," Conan the Barbarian answered in 1982: "To crush your enemies, to see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentations of their women." Arnold Schwarzenegger's sincere though stolid delivery of that dialogue became iconic, reflecting his relative inexperience as an actor as well as the movie's macho, action-first aesthetic. The great John Milius directed the muscular action adventure and cowrote the screenplay with Oliver Stone. Discounting the little-seen Hercules in New York, It was the first starring role for former bodybuilding champion Schwarzenegger and proved to be a box office success, leading to  the sequel Conan the Destroyer two years later.   Schwarzenegger's career...

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- Peter Martin

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Relativity Television Relaunches After Post-Bankruptcy Split as Critical Content (Exclusive)

26 January 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

From the ashes of the Relativity Media bankruptcy comes … Critical Content. That’s the new moniker for the Relativity Television division that was acquired in October by Relativity’s major creditors as part of the parent company’s bankruptcy brawl last fall.

Critical CEO Tom Forman and president Andrew Marcus have spent the past three months re-engineering operations after the detachment from Relativity. The process has been greased by a $75 million equity influx from the new owners, led by Anchorage Capital. Although Anchorage is a major investor in MGM, there are no plans to meld Critical with the Lion’s television operations.

“We have been plotting out plans for 2016 and 2017, and figuring out how we’re going to deploy a tremendous amount of capital,” Forman said.

Among the priorities for Critical is revving up its scripted series development. In the past few weeks, the company has set up a drama »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Sundance Film Review: ’31’

25 January 2016 2:07 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rob Zombie truly loves horror movies. But he still hasn’t made a good one, and “31” is a perfect encapsulation of the reasons why: It’s a fanboy’s highlight reel of homages, without any of the credibility or context that made most of the films he’s inspired by so fine. Those who liked his first narrative features, “House of 1000 Corpses” and “The Devil’s Rejects,” will probably enjoy his latest, which feels like a mash-up of the two (as well as numerous older films). But for others, this energetic exercise in forced badassery will be too silly and self-conscious to feel genuinely edgy, despite all the blood spilt and familiar taboos violated. (You know something’s wrong when your reaction to one character’s entrance is “Oh. A Nazi killer dwarf. That figures.”) As with Zombie’s prior efforts outside the “Halloween” reboots, this looks destined for »

- Dennis Harvey

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The Big Short review – life with the Wall Street sharks

24 January 2016 12:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A dramatic retelling of the 2007-8 financial crisis reveals a riveting world of chaos, corruption and misfits

Unlike the slick suits and killer sheen of Oliver Stone’s Wall Street, this is a world of chaos and disorder

One of the strangest elements of Anchorman director Adam McKay’s goofy 2010 comedy The Other Guys was the inclusion of some credit sequence infographics about corporate fraud and capitalist corruption that seemed to have been crowbarred in from another movie. It now transpires that McKay, a Saturday Night Live graduate who is no stranger to political satire, viewed The Other Guys as a slapstick allegory for the recent financial crisis and was working on the movie when he first read Michael Lewis’s nonfiction book The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, an account of the people who predicted (and profited from) the crash of 2007-8.

Continue reading »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Flickering Myth’s Big, Fat Movie Checklist of 2016

23 January 2016 1:31 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Now that 2015 is over, there are plenty of ‘Best Of’ lists pronouncing the movies you should have seen already. Hell, even we did it at Flickering Myth. But by the end of the year, it’s too late. You suddenly have 50+ films you missed out on to catch up with. Where were the ‘Best Ofs’ as the year was in progress? That’s where Flickering Myth’s Big, Fat Movie Checklist of 2016 comes in.

Suicide Squad is released on 5th August, 2016.

While there are many retrospective lists online, there are very few resources updated regularly for the movies of the year.

Below are the movies worth watching in 2016, based on their current UK release dates (which these days is pretty similar to the Us). Most of the January releases have already come out, many upcoming ones will be pushed back or brought forward. We’ll update the list monthly to »

- Oli Davis

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Christopher Nolan and Tilda Swinton on David Bowie, Ziegfeld’s Cinematic End, the Skies of ‘Sicario,’ and More

20 January 2016 2:40 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Christopher Nolan remembers working with David Bowie at EW:

When we were casting The Prestige, we had gotten very stuck on the character of Nikola Tesla. Tesla was this other-worldly, ahead-of-his-time figure, and at some point it occurred to me he was the original Man Who Fell to Earth. As someone who was the biggest Bowie fan in the world, once I made that connection, he seemed to be the only actor capable of playing the part. He had that requisite iconic status, and he was a figure as mysterious as Tesla needed to be. It took me a while to convince him, though—he turned down the part the first time. »

- TFS Staff

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About American Psycho

15 January 2016 2:32 PM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Lionsgate

Mary Harron’s American Psycho is a brilliant piece of film-making, but nonetheless a very, very weird one. When else have you seen an investment banker consider feeding a stray cat to a cash machine, for instance?

With that in mind, you might be surprised to hear that there was an even stranger story going on behind the scenes – actors were sacked, directors replaced and at one point the script ended with a big musical number atop a New York landmark. No really, it did.

Within the film itself there’s often more going on than meets the eye, as well. There’s improvisation, unsettling editing and tiny references back to Bret Easton Ellis’ iconic novel that you might have missed. And just you wait until you hear all the weird ways in which Christian Bale prepared for the role of Patrick Bateman. A role that, for a time, »

- Rob Leane

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‘Taxi Driver’ Writer Paul Schrader Tapped for Final Draft Hall of Fame Honors

15 January 2016 12:13 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Final Draft Inc. has announced Paul Schrader as its Hall of Fame Award honoree for the 11th annual Final Draft Awards.

The Hall of Fame Award honors a writer whose work has had a profound influence on the industry. Schrader has written many classics, including “Taxi Driver,” “Raging Bull,” The Last Temptation of Christ,” “The Mosquito Coast” and “Bringing Out the Dead.” He also wrote and directed “Affliction,” “American Gigolo” and “Mishima: A Life in four Chapters.”

“As we mark our 25th year in business, we have so much to celebrate at the Final Draft Awards this year. I’m especially honored to bestow iconic screenwriter Paul Schrader with our Hall of Fame Award during this historic year,” said Marc Madnick, CEO of Final Draft, Inc. “In addition, our partnership with the Writers Guild Foundation is another great way to observe our anniversary and helps to further our mission of »

- Jacob Bryant

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

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