IMDb > Susan Sarandon > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1996

18 items from 2005


Elizabethtown

25 October 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This review was written for the festival screening of "Elizabethtown".

VENICE, Italy -- There's a winning little road picture with an appealing couple and great music in writer-director Cameron Crowe's "Elizabethtown", but it's not until Orlando Bloom and Kirsten Dunst blow town that it gets up any speed.

Crowe makes an awkward start with a load of tosh about the shoe business, and he dwells far too long on a gaggle of sentimental small-town stereotypes instead of getting the leads out on Route 66 where they belong.

The overelaborate film, screened out of competition at the Venice International Film Festival, would be far better off losing a third of its 133 minutes, and its unnecessary length may contribute to a slack boxoffice unless the sparks that finally occur between the leads prompts positive word-of-mouth.

Told in high spirits throughout, the story centers on Drew Baylor (Bloom), a brilliant designer of running shoes who has spent eight years ignoring friends and family while developing a unique new shoe for footwear mogul Phil (Alec Baldwin).

For reasons not explained, the shoe is destined not just to flop but flop catastrophically, costing Phil's company nearly $1 billion. This turn of events causes Drew to contemplate suicide by attaching a sharp knife to his exercise machine so that it will stab him in the chest when he rides it.

Before he can pedal himself to death, however, his father dies while visiting Elizabethtown, Ky., where he grew up, and Drew is ordered by his sister and mother to travel from their Oregon home to collect his body.

Drew turns out to be the only passenger going to Louisville on that flight, so attendant Claire (Dunst) is able to give him her undivided attention. This inauspicious beginning includes her divining the source of his despondency and personality analysis based on people's names.

Elizabethtown, Drew discovers, is populated by the kind of nosey, opinionated and loud people that cause so many to leave small towns like that. The major conflict is over where Drew's dad will be buried and whether he will be cremated, as they don't believe in that kind of thing in rural areas of the Bluegrass State.

Not only that, but Drew's mom Hollie (Susan Sarandon) is generally regarded as a wild one as she took Drew's dad away from Elizabethtown to California, even though they only lived there for 18 months and have resided in Oregon for more than 20 years.

There's a long and tiresome sequence in which Hollie shows up at her husband’s memorial service and proceeds to dazzle everyone with a comical speech and a tap dance to salute her late husband.

Meanwhile, Claire has attached herself to Drew, even though she claims to have a lover who is "married to his job." Finally, the fun part begins when Drew sets off in his rental to drive from Kentucky across country to the coast, scattering his dad's ashes at wonderful places along the way.

Drew is guided by an intricate map created and narrated by Claire, complete with side visits, pit stops and fabulous music as he cruises through places like Memphis and Eureka Springs, Ark., and on to Oklahoma City and Scottsbluff, Nev.

The song score is excellent, with tracks from Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tom Petty, Elton John and many others perfect for a road trip. It's that, along with the chemistry of Bloom and Dunst, and the great open roads of the American mid-South and West that make the film worth seeing.

ELIZABETHTOWN

Paramount Pictures

Cruise/Wagner Prods. and Vinyl Films

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Cameron Crowe

Producers: Tom Cruise, Paula Wagner, Cameron Crowe

Executive producer: Donald J. Lee Jr.

Director of photography: John Toll

Production designer: Clay A. Griffith

Editor: David Moritz

Composer: Nancy Wilson

Cast:

Drew Baylor: Orlando Bloom

Claire: Kirsten Dunst

Hollie Baylor: Susan Sarandon

Phil: Alec Baldwin

Bill Banyon: Bruce McGill

Heather Baylor: Judy Greer

Ellen: Jessica Biel

Jessie: Paul Schneider

Aunt Dora: Paula Deen

Uncle Dale: Loudon Wainwright

Aunt Lena: Alice Marie Crowe

Sharon: Patty Griffin

MPAA rating PG-13

Running time -- 133 minutes »

Permalink | Report a problem


Elizabethtown

20 October 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This review was written for the festival screening of "Elizabethtown".

VENICE, Italy -- There's a winning little road picture with an appealing couple and great music in writer-director Cameron Crowe's "Elizabethtown", but it's not until Orlando Bloom and Kirsten Dunst blow town that it gets up any speed.

Crowe makes an awkward start with a load of tosh about the shoe business, and he dwells far too long on a gaggle of sentimental small-town stereotypes instead of getting the leads out on Route 66 where they belong.

The overelaborate film, screened out of competition at the Venice International Film Festival, would be far better off losing a third of its 133 minutes, and its unnecessary length may contribute to a slack boxoffice unless the sparks that finally occur between the leads prompts positive word-of-mouth.

Told in high spirits throughout, the story centers on Drew Baylor (Bloom), a brilliant designer of running shoes who has spent eight years ignoring friends and family while developing a unique new shoe for footwear mogul Phil (Alec Baldwin).

For reasons not explained, the shoe is destined not just to flop but flop catastrophically, costing Phil's company nearly $1 billion. This turn of events causes Drew to contemplate suicide by attaching a sharp knife to his exercise machine so that it will stab him in the chest when he rides it.

Before he can pedal himself to death, however, his father dies while visiting Elizabethtown, Ky., where he grew up, and Drew is ordered by his sister and mother to travel from their Oregon home to collect his body.

Drew turns out to be the only passenger going to Elizabethtown on that flight, so attendant Claire (Dunst) is able to give him her undivided attention. This inauspicious beginning includes her divining the source of his despondency and personality analysis based on people's names.

Elizabethtown, Drew discovers, is populated by the kind of nosey, opinionated and loud people that cause so many to leave small towns like that. The major conflict is over where Drew's dad will be buried and whether he will be cremated, as they don't believe in that kind of thing in rural areas of the Bluegrass State.

Not only that, but Drew's mom Hollie (Susan Sarandon) is generally regarded as a wild one as she took Drew's dad away from Elizabethtown to California, even though they only lived there for 18 months and have resided in Oregon for more than 20 years.

There's a long and tiresome sequence in which a couple's wedding banquet is taken over for a memorial to Drew's dad. Hollie shows up, a very Merry Widow, and proceeds to dazzle everyone with a comical speech and a tap dance to salute her late husband.

Meanwhile, Claire has attached herself to Drew, even though she claims to have a married lover who is always out of town. Finally, the fun part begins when Drew sets off in his rental to drive from Kentucky across country to the coast, scattering his dad's ashes at wonderful places along the way.

Drew is guided by an intricate map created and narrated by Claire, complete with side visits, pit stops and fabulous music as he cruises through places like Memphis and Eureka Springs, Ark., and on to Oklahoma City and Scottsbluff, Nev.

The song score is excellent, with tracks from Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tom Petty, Elton John and many others perfect for a road trip. It's that, along with the chemistry of Bloom and Dunst, and the great open roads of the American mid-South and West that make the film worth seeing.

ELIZABETHTOWN

Paramount Pictures

Cruise/Wagner Prods. and Vinyl Films

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Cameron Crowe

Producers: Tom Cruise, Paula Wagner, Cameron Crowe

Executive producer: Donald J. Lee Jr.

Director of photography: John Toll

Production designer: Clay A. Griffith

Editor: David Moritz

Composer: Nancy Wilson

Cast:

Drew Baylor: Orlando Bloom

Claire: Kirsten Dunst

Hollie Baylor: Susan Sarandon

Phil: Alec Baldwin

Bill Banyon: Bruce McGill

Heather Baylor: Judy Greer

Ellen: Jessica Biel

Jessie: Paul Schneider

Aunt Dora: Paula Deen

Uncle Dale: Loudon Wainwright

Aunt Lena: Alice Marie Crowe

Sharon: Patty Griffin

MPAA rating PG-13

Running time -- 133 minutes »

Permalink | Report a problem


Fnc: Capsule Reviews #1

16 October 2005 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Romance & Cigarettes Wouldn't it be fun if life were like a musical? ... everybody signing and dancing all the time? Well, although this idea sounds utterly appealing to me, I must admit I didn't like the film. It had everything going for it: witty musical numbers, Susan Sarandon, Christopher Walken, sex, cigarettes and romance. Unfortunately the end result didn't meet expectations. Most of the musical numbers are great but the plot of the film and the characters are not so interesting. By the end of the film we don't care about them and the film never ends - it just goes on and on and on. This is the feeling you want in most musicals—after all, like Selma in Dancer in the Dark, don't we all want to leave after the next to last song in musical so that the film goes on forever in our mind ?—, not for this film however. »

Permalink | Report a problem


A-listers tapped for HFF fete

27 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Charlize Theron, Joaquin Phoenix, Matthew Broderick and Susan Sarandon are on tap to receive acting honors at the ninth annual Hollywood Film Festival's Awards Gala Ceremony on Oct. 24 at the Beverly Hilton. Theron is Hollywood Actress of the Year for her work in the upcoming Warner Bros. Pictures' release, North Country. Phoenix is being cited as Hollywood Actor of the Year for his performance as Johnny Cash in 20th Century Fox's Walk the Line. The Hollywood Supporting Actor of the Year is going to Broderick for reprising his Broadway role in Universal Pictures' The Producers, while Sarandon will take home the Hollywood Supporting Actress of the Year Award for her turn in Paramount Pictures' Elizabethtown. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Romance & Cigarettes

7 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE, Italy -- The Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney spirit is alive and well in John Turturro's "Romance & Cigarettes," with some top stars -- including James Gandolfini, Susan Sarandon and Kate Winslet -- gamely putting on a show, but the sad result is a karaoke nightmare.

Loud and pointlessly crude, the film takes the disintegration of a dysfunctional working-class family and gives it the song-and-dance treatment. It's not pleasant to contemplate the kind of audience that would respond to this, but it's likely to be small and made up of people who fantasize about seeing Tony Soprano belt out "A Man Without Love" along with Engelbert Humperdinck.

Over the top from the start, the film follows Nick Murder (Gandolfini), a builder with no evident mob associations, as he grapples with his noisy wife, Kitty (Sarandon), and dabbles with his redheaded mistress named Tula (Winslet).

Garbagemen, telephone workers and firefighters burst into song at a moment's notice, dancing in the streets, usually to something by Tom Jones or James Brown, as Kitty finds out about Tula and ropes in weird Cousin Bo (Christopher Walken) to hunt her down.

There's a second generation of Murders -- Mary-Louise Parker, Aida Turturro and Mandy Moore -- who torment their father and play in a raucous rock band in the back yard. Moore also has a syncopated passion for a flamboyant neighborhood boy who calls himself Fryburg (Bobby Cannavale).

While Kitty finds solace screaming out "Piece of My Heart" with Janis Joplin and a church choir led by an organist named Gene Vincent (Eddie Izzard, who is wasted), Nick decides to get a circumcision, the better, he believes, to delight women.

The performers all appear to be very pleased with themselves for letting their knickers down, kicking up their heels and being such good sports. Gandolfini acts like Tony Soprano, Sarandon is in full "men are swine" mode and Winslet talks dirty and inexplicably with an accent from England's far north. Ricky Gervais talked Winslet into using gutter language amusingly for his new BBC/HBO television series "Extras", but it appears she's gotten into the habit.

Walken makes an amusing entrance to Elvis Presley's "Trouble" but has little to do after that. Steve Buscemi, as always, fills whatever screen space he occupies with his unique and flawless technique, and Elaine Stritch expertly delivers a bitter but amusing reflection on the men in her life.

They are the only redeeming elements of a picture that strains too hard and bursts of its own self-regard. Turturro, a fine actor, says he dreamed up "Romance & Cigarettes" while making "Barton Fink". It looks more like something that might have been made by Jesus Quintana, the wild man of the bowling alley he played in "The Big Lebowski".

ROMANCE & CIGARETTES

United Artists and Joel & Ethan Coen present in association with Icon Entertainment International a Greenestreet Films production

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: John Turturro

Producers: John Penotti, John Turturro

Executive producers: Jana Edelbaum, Matthew Rowland, Nick Hill, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

Director of photography: Tom Stern

Production designer: Donna Zakowska

Editor: Ray Hubley

Cast:

Nick Murder: James Gandolfini

Kitty: Susan Sarandon

Tula: Kate Winslet

Angelo: Steve Buscemi

Fryburg: Bobby Cannavale

Baby: Mandy Moore

Constance: Mary-Louise Parker

Rosebud: Aida Turturro

Cousin Bo: Christopher Walken

Gracie: Barbara Sukowa

Nick's mother: Elaine Stritch

Gene Vincent: Eddie Izzard

MPAA rating R

Running time -- 105 minutes »

Permalink | Report a problem


Elizabethtown

7 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE, Italy -- There's a winning little road picture with an appealing couple and great music in writer-director Cameron Crowe's "Elizabethtown", but it's not until Orlando Bloom and Kirsten Dunst blow town that it gets up any speed.

Crowe makes an awkward start with a load of tosh about the shoe business, and he dwells far too long on a gaggle of sentimental small-town stereotypes instead of getting the leads out on Route 66 where they belong.

The overelaborate film, screened out of competition at the Venice International Film Festival, would be far better off losing a third of its 133 minutes, and its unnecessary length may contribute to a slack boxoffice unless the sparks that finally occur between the leads prompts positive word-of-mouth.

Told in high spirits throughout, the story centers on Drew Baylor (Bloom), a brilliant designer of running shoes who has spent eight years ignoring friends and family while developing a unique new shoe for footwear mogul Phil (Alec Baldwin).

For reasons not explained, the shoe is destined not just to flop but flop catastrophically, costing Phil's company nearly $1 billion. This turn of events causes Drew to contemplate suicide by attaching a sharp knife to his exercise machine so that it will stab him in the chest when he rides it.

Before he can pedal himself to death, however, his father dies while visiting Elizabethtown, Ky., where he grew up, and Drew is ordered by his sister and mother to travel from their Oregon home to collect his body.

Drew turns out to be the only passenger going to Elizabethtown on that flight, so attendant Claire (Dunst) is able to give him her undivided attention. This inauspicious beginning includes her divining the source of his despondency and personality analysis based on people's names.

Elizabethtown, Drew discovers, is populated by the kind of nosey, opinionated and loud people that cause so many to leave small towns like that. The major conflict is over where Drew's dad will be buried and whether he will be cremated, as they don't believe in that kind of thing in rural areas of the Bluegrass State.

Not only that, but Drew's mom Kitty (Susan Sarandon) is generally regarded as a wild one as she took Drew's dad away from Elizabethtown to California, even though they only lived there for 18 months and have resided in Oregon for more than 20 years.

There's a long and tiresome sequence in which a couple's wedding banquet is taken over for a memorial to Drew's dad. Kitty shows up, a very Merry Widow, and proceeds to dazzle everyone with a comical speech and a tap dance to salute her late husband.

Meanwhile, Claire has attached herself to Drew, even though she claims to have a married lover who is always out of town. Finally, the fun part begins when Drew sets off in his rental to drive from Kentucky across country to the coast, scattering his dad's ashes at wonderful places along the way.

Drew is guided by an intricate map created and narrated by Claire, complete with side visits, pit stops and fabulous music as he cruises through places like Memphis and Eureka Springs, Ark., and on to Oklahoma City and Scottsbluff, Nev.

The song score is excellent, with tracks from Lynyrd Skynyrd, Tom Petty, Elton John and many others perfect for a road trip. It's that, along with the chemistry of Bloom and Dunst, and the great open roads of the American mid-South and West that make the film worth seeing.

ELIZABETHTOWN

Paramount Pictures

Cruise/Wagner Prods. and Vinyl Films

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Cameron Crowe

Producers: Tom Cruise, Paula Wagner, Cameron Crowe

Executive producer: Donald J. Lee Jr.

Director of photography: John Toll

Production designer: Clay A. Griffith

Editor: David Moritz

Composer: Nancy Wilson

Cast:

Drew Baylor: Orlando Bloom

Claire: Kirsten Dunst

Hollie Baylor: Susan Sarandon

Phil: Alec Baldwin

Bill Banyon: Bruce McGill

Heather Baylor: Judy Greer

Ellen: Jessica Biel

Jessie: Paul Schneider

Aunt Dora: Paula Deen

Uncle Dale: Loudon Wainwright

Aunt Lena: Alice Marie Crowe

Sharon: Patty Griffin

MPAA rating PG-13

Running time -- 133 minutes »

Permalink | Report a problem


Stars Support West's Outburst

7 September 2005 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Jay-Z, Sean 'Diddy' Combs and Matt Damon are among a host of stars who have applauded Kanye West for his public attack on Us President George W. Bush on Friday. During an appearance on A Concert For Hurricane Relief - a live telethon broadcast across America - West broke away from his script to voice his disgust at the media's portrayal of the Gulf Region's African-Americans and to slam the slow delivery of aid. But the biggest stir of all came when West boldly declared, "George Bush doesn't care about black people." West's Def Jam colleague Jay-Z says, "I'm backing Kanye 100 per cent. This is America. You should be able to say what you want to say. We have freedom of speech. (The slow response to the disaster) is really numbing. You can't believe it's happening in America. You wonder, what's going on? Why were people so slow to react? I don't understand it." Combs notes, "I think he spoke from his heart. He spoke what a lot of people feel... It ain't adding up, man. It's not making sense. If the reporters can get there and you all can get there with microphones, somebody should be able to get there with food." Damon adds, "This guy with his moment on live television made a statement that hopefully now Bush will come out and address, because he doesn't have to address anything else... The White House Press Corp, they should all have their credentials taken away. Not one of them's an honest journalist. Not one of them asked a question of the guy." Meanwhile, actress Susan Sarandon has a slightly different take on West's comments: "I don't think that's an original thought, but it's probably true." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Romance & Cigarettes

6 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE -- The Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney spirit is alive and well in John Turturro's Romance & Cigarettes with some top stars including James Gandolfini, Susan Sarandon, and Kate Winslet gamely putting on a show, but the sad result is a karaoke nightmare.

Loud and pointlessly crude, the film takes the disintegration of a dysfunctional working class family and gives it the song-and-dance treatment. It's not pleasant to contemplate the kind of audience that would respond to this, but it's likely to be small and made up of people who fantasize about seeing Tony Soprano belt out A Man Without Love along with Engelbert Humperdinck.

Over the top from the start, the film follows Nick Murder (Gandolfini), a builder although with no evident mob associations, as he grapples with his noisy wife Kitty (Sarandon) and dabbles with his redheaded mistress named Tula (Winslet).

Garbage men, telephone workers and firefighters burst into song at a moment's notice, dancing in the streets, usually to something by Tom Jones or James Brown, as Kitty finds out about Tula and ropes in weird Cousin Bo (Christopher Walken) to hunt her down.

There's a second generation of Murders, Mary-Louise Parker, Aida Turturro and Mandy Moore, who torment their father and play in a raucous rock band in the back yard. Moore also has a syncopated passion for a flamboyant neighborhood boy who calls himself Fryburg (Bobby Cannavale).

While Kitty finds solace screaming out Piece of My Heart with Janis Joplin and a church choir led by an organist named Gene Vincent (Eddie Izzard, who is wasted), Nick decides to get a circumcision, the better, he believes, to delight women.

The performers all appear to be very pleased with themselves for letting their knickers down, kicking up their heels and being such good sports. Gandolfini acts like Tony Soprano; Sarandon is in full "men are swine" mode; and Winslet talks dirty and inexplicably with an accent from England's far north. Ricky Gervais talked Winslet into using gutter language amusingly for his new BBC/HBO television series Extras, but it appears she's gotten into the habit.

Walken makes an amusing entrance to Elvis Presley's Trouble but has little to do after that. Buscemi, as always, fills whatever screen space he occupies with his unique and flawless technique, and Elaine Stritch expertly delivers a bitter but amusing reflection on the men in her life.

They are the only redeeming elements of a picture that strains too hard and bursts of its own self-regard. Turturro, a fine actor, says he dreamed up "Romance & Cigarettes" while making Barton Fink. It looks more like something that might have been made by Jesus Quintana, the wild man of the bowling alley he played in The Big Lubowski.

ROMANCE & CIGARETTES

United Artists and Joel & Ethan Cohen present, in association with Icon Entertainment International, a Greenestreet Films production.

Credits: Director and screenwriter: John Turturro

Producers: John Penotti, John Turturro

Executive producers: Jana Edelbaum, Matthew Rowland, Nick Hill, Joel Cohen, Ethan Cohen

Director of photography: Tom Stern

Production designer: Donna Zakowska

Editor: Ray Hubley

Cast:

Nick Murder: James Gandolfini

Kitty: Susan Sarandon

Tula: Kate Winslet

Angelo: Steve Buscemi

Fryburg: Bobby Cannavale

Baby: Mandy Moore

Constance: Mary-Louise Parker

Rosebud: Aida Turturro

Cousin Bo: Christopher Walken

Gracie: Barbara Sukowa

Nick's mother: Elaine Stritch

Gene Vincent: Eddie Izzard

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 105 mins »

Permalink | Report a problem


Elizabethtown

6 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE -- There's a winning little road picture with an appealing couple and great music in writer and director Cameron Crowe's Elizabethtown, but it's not until Orlando Bloom and Kirsten Dunst blow town that it gets up any speed.

Crowe makes an awkward start with a load of tosh about the shoe business and he dwells far too long on a gaggle of sentimental small-town stereotypes instead of getting the leads out on Route 66 where they belong.

The over-elaborate film, screened Out of Competition at the Venice International Film Festival, would be far better off losing a third of its 133 minutes and its unnecessary length may contribute to a slack box office unless the sparks that finally occur between the leads prompts positive word of mouth.

Told in high spirits throughout, the story centers on Drew Baylor (Bloom), a brilliant designer of running shoes who has spent eight years ignoring friends and family while developing a unique new shoe for footwear mogul Phil (Alec Baldwin).

For reasons not explained, the shoe is destined not just to flop but flop catastrophically, costing Phil's company nearly $1 billion. This turn of events causes Drew to contemplate suicide by attaching a sharp knife to his exercise machine so that it will stab him in the chest when he rides it.

Before he can pedal himself to death, however, his father dies while visiting Elizabethtown, Kentucky, where he grew up, and Drew is ordered by his sister and mother to travel from their Oregon home to collect his body.

Drew turns out to be the only passenger going to Elizabethtown on that flight and so attendant Claire (Dunst) is able to give him her undivided attention. This inauspicious beginning includes her divining the source of his despondency and personality analysis based on people's names.

Elizabethtown, Drew discovers, is populated by the kind of nosey, opinionated and loud people that cause so many to leave small towns like that. The major conflict is over where Drew's dad will be buried and whether or not he will be cremated, as they don't believe in that kind of thing in rural areas of the Blue Grass State.

Not only that, but Drew's mom Kitty (Susan Sarandon) is generally regarded as a wild one as she took Drew's dad away from Elizabethtown to California, even though they only lived there for 18 months and have resided in Oregon for more than 20 years.

There's a long and tiresome sequence in which a couple's wedding banquet is taken over for a memorial to Drew's dad. Kitty shows up, a very Merry Widow, and proceeds to dazzle everyone with a comical speech and a tap dance to salute her late husband.

Meanwhile, Claire has attached herself to Drew even though she claims to have a married lover who is always out of town. Finally, the fun part begins when Drew sets off in his rental to drive from Kentucky across country to the coast, scattering his dad's ashes at wonderful places along the way.

Drew is guided by an intricate map created and narrated by Claire, complete with side visits, pit stops and fabulous music as he cruises through places like Memphis, Tennessee and Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and on to Oklahoma City and Scottsbluff, Nevada.

The song score is excellent, with tracks from Lynard Skynard, Tom Petty, Elton John and many others perfect for a road trip. It's that, along with the chemistry of Bloom and Dunst, and the great open roads of the American mid-south and west that make the film worth seeing.

ELIZABETHTOWN

Paramount Pictures present a Cruise/Wagner/Vinyl Films production.

Credits:

Director and screenwriter: Cameron Crowe

Producers: Tom Cruise, Paula Wagner, Cameron Crowe

Executive producer: Donald J. Lee Jr.

Director of photography: John Toll

Production designer: Clay A. Griffith

Editor: David Moritz

Composer: Nancy Wilson

Cast: Drew Baylor: Orlando Bloom

Claire: Kirsten Dunst

Hollie Baylor: Susan Sarandon

Phil: Alec Baldwin

Bill Banyon: Bruce McGill

Heather Baylor: Judy Greer

Ellen: Jessica Biel

Jessie: Paul Schneider

Aunt Dora: Paula Deen

Uncle Dale: Loudon Wainwright

Aunt Lena: Alice Marie Crowe

Sharon: Patty Griffin

MPPA rating PG-13

Running time -- 133 mins »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Cigarettes' stars light up Venice fest

6 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE -- James Gandolfini, Susan Sarandon, John Turturro and the Coen Brothers waltzed their way onto the Lido Tuesday for the premiere of the bawdy musical Romance & Cigarettes. Director Turturro's movie was the second U.S. title to unspool here in competition. One of the largest entourages to arrive yet provided ample opportunity for a packed news conference to quiz the filmmaker and stars. But the event was largely dominated by questions fired to Sarandon about her views on Hollywood and politics. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Cigarettes' stars light up Venice fest

6 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE -- James Gandolfini, Susan Sarandon, John Turturro and the Coen Brothers waltzed their way onto the Lido Tuesday for the premiere of the bawdy musical Romance & Cigarettes. Director Turturro's movie was the second U.S. title to unspool here in competition. One of the largest entourages to arrive yet provided ample opportunity for a packed news conference to quiz the filmmaker and stars. But the event was largely dominated by questions fired to Sarandon about her views on Hollywood and politics. Sarandon joshed that the only way to end your career in Hollywood was to get "old and fat." She said Hollywood wasn't really a "political entity that is going to evolve in some way." She also said that it was a pity that men got paid more than women to be in movies but added that many of the roles did not appeal to her. The movie script, described by producers Joel and Ethan Coen as "sufficiently demented" to bring them on board, trades in foulmouthed dialogue and lewd sexual references. "Dirty language of a certain kind is a certain art and everything can't be sweet," said Turturro, who penned the project in addition to directing it. "We made a list of interesting expressions and as long as it is humorous it is fun." Prior to the news conference, a war of words broke out between Venice festival organizers and a major Italian newswire service. Organizers said Italy's second-largest wire service, Adnkronos, had misrepresented the tone and content of festival coverage from outlets including The Hollywood Reporter. Adnkronos ran an article -- picked up by the Venice daily Il Gazzettino -- which said that U.S. press coverage had slammed the festival organization and the movies so far. But organizers fired back at the wire service, saying in a press statement that the "tone and comments" of coverage "were in fact positive." As the war of words broke out, Venice entered the home stretch and Italian entries pushed to the fore. Tuesday saw the first Italian movie unspool in competition as Roberto Faenza's I Giorni dell'Abbandono hit the screen. Both Cristina Comencini's La Bestia Nel Cuore and Pupi Avati's La Seconda Notte di Nozze also will vie for the jury's attention as Saturday's awards ceremony approaches. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Goodnight' ahead for Venice fest

19 August 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

ROME -- George Clooney's sophomore directorial outing Goodnight, and Good Luck, starring Clooney, Robert Downey Jr. and Patricia Clarkson, will lead off the competition section of the 62nd International Venice Film Festival on Sept. 1, organizers said Thursday. The other American film in competition, John Turturro's Romance and Cigarettes, which stars James Gandolfini, Kate Winslet, Susan Sarandon and Christopher Walken, screens Sept. 6. The festival runs Aug. 31-Sep. 10. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Cornish tapped for Oz star award

16 August 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

GOLD COAST, Queensland -- Abbie Cornish was named Australian Star of the Year during Monday night's opening proceedings at the Australian International Movie Convention. Cornish, who won an Australian Film Institute award last year for her lead role in Somersault, will next be seen opposite Heath Ledger in Neil Armfield's Candy, which had a sneak preview for exhibitors Monday night. Exhibitors also were treated to a preview of upcoming Australian product Monday. Trailers screened included Little Fish, with Cate Blanchett, Hugo Weaving and Martin Henderson; Like Minds, featuring Toni Collette and Richard Roxburgh; and Irresistible, starring Susan Sarandon and Sam Neill. Rolf de Heer's Ten Canoes, however, appeared to receive the greatest buzz following the previews.The story of love and family with humorous overtones is set in the time before white settlement and is the world's first-ever dramatic feature shot in the Aboriginal language. Canoes was filmed on location in the Northern Territory. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Sarandon to receive honor at Locarno fest

27 July 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

ROME -- Two more titles were added Wednesday to this year's lineup of films in competition for the Locarno International Film Festival's Golden Leopard prize. They are Canadian director Louise Archambault's Familia and Yvan Le Moine's Vendredi ou un Autre Jour, a Belgium-France-Italy co-production. The new titles join 15 others announced last week. Festival organizers also said that Susan Sarandon will be on hand to receive an excellence award and that the opening film in the Piazza Grande will be Ketan Mehta's The Rising -- Ballad of Mangal Pandey. The festival runs Aug. 3-13. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Star treatment for Aussie indies

29 March 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- International top-name actors are setting aside large portions of their usual multimillion-dollar salary requirements to put their considerable weight behind a new generation of Australian independent films. During the past 18 months, such marquee names as Laura Linney, Cate Blanchett, Susan Sarandon and Ray Winstone have signed up for local independent projects with producers who hope the high-profile talent deals will be their passport to the lucrative North American market and significant worldwide presales. Homegrown talent also is signing up for indie projects, including Geoffrey Rush and Sam Neill. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Star treatment for Aussie indies

29 March 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- International top-name actors are setting aside large portions of their usual multimillion-dollar salary requirements to put their considerable weight behind a new generation of Australian independent films. During the past 18 months, such marquee names as Laura Linney, Cate Blanchett, Susan Sarandon and Ray Winstone have signed up for local independent projects with producers who hope the high-profile talent deals will be their passport to the lucrative North American market and significant worldwide presales. Homegrown talent also is signing up for indie projects, including Geoffrey Rush and Sam Neill. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Sarandon wed to NL's 'Woodcock'

22 February 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Susan Sarandon is joining the cast of New Line Cinema's Mr. Woodcock. Craig Gillespie is helming the comedy, and Bob Cooper is producing via his Landscape Pictures. The script centers on a young man Seann William Scott) who returns to his hometown to stop his mother (Sarandon) from marrying his old high school gym teacher, who made life a living hell for him and many of his classmates. Billy Bob Thornton plays the gym teacher. Brian Inerfeld and Karen Lunder are serving as co-producers. At the studio, executives Kent Alterman, Michele Weiss and Keith Goldberg are overseeing. Sarandon, repped by ICM, will be seen in the upcoming Cameron Crowe film Elizabethtown and recently appeared in Alfie. She won an Oscar for her performance in 1995's Dead Man Walking. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Sarandon, Deneuve at fest gala

15 February 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

BERLIN -- Susan Sarandon, Tim Robbins, Christopher Lee, Bob Hoskins and Catherine Deneuve were among the international stars lending support to the fourth Berlin Cinema for Peace gala evening Monday. The lavish event, which raises funds for UNICEF and other children's charities, was staged in the opulent surroundings of the city's 19th century Konzerthaus a couple of blocks down the street from where Checkpoint Charlie once marked the gateway to West Berlin. "There is perhaps no better place for the film community to come together and stand against foolishness and hate," Sarandon said in an opening address. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1996

18 items from 2005


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners