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1-20 of 24 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Susan Sarandon Reveals Her Sexual Orientation Is Currently ‘Up for Grabs’

15 February 2017 4:01 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Susan Sarandon did not hold back when discussing her dating life and sexuality in a candid interview with pridesource.com.

The actress — who is currently playing Bette Davis opposite Jessica Lange, who stars as Joan Crawford, in the new FX series Feud — said that at the moment, “My sexual orientation is up for grabs, I guess you could say.”

Sarandon also opened up about a past relationship with gay actor Philip Sayer. The British actor, who died in 1989, and Sarandon were co-stars in the 1983 film The Hunger. “I did at one point have a very successful and very loving and »

- Mia McNiece

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Susan Sarandon Reveals That Her Sexual Orientation Is 'Open' and 'Up for Grabs'

15 February 2017 8:36 AM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Susan Sarandon is not holding back!

Ever the straight-shooter, the 70-year-old actress describes her sexual orientation these days as "open" in a new, candid interview.

Watch: Susan Sarandon Stuns in Cleavage-Baring Pantsuit, Talks Evolution of 'Women Over a Certain Age' in Hollywood 

"My sexual orientation is up for grabs, I guess you could say," the Feud star revealed to PrideSource.

Sarandon, though, says she hasn't been able to take full advantage of her sexual fluidity because of her past relationships with ex-husbands Chris Sarandon, who she married at age 20, and Tim Robbins. Now, much to her alarm, she's not being courted by many men or women.

"I'm a serial monogamist," she said, "so I haven't really had a large dating career. I haven't exactly been in the midst of a lot of offers of any kind. I'm still not! I don't know what's going on! But I think back in the '60s it just was much »

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Sundance ’17: It’s a Wrap!

8 February 2017 5:32 AM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

Sundance is over and the prizes are won. People have dispersed to their homes and the realities that await them there.

This was a Sundance like no other I can remember, and I have attended every single one since 1986! The cold was extreme; and the political engagement and disgust was extreme. Not only did we have the Inauguration the first day, but the Women’s March the second day had probably 6,000 people marching and on that day the first of many deplorable executive orders (this one against women of the world and their control over their own bodies) began flying off the desk of our current president, who has continued to issue at least one every day, each one more despicable than the previous. Politics and women took center stage.

Chelsea Handler leads the women’s march in Park City, Utah. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

The Sundance slant »

- Sydney Levine

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‘Hot Winter’ Director Jack Henry Robbins & Dad Tim Robbins On Playing With Form – Sundance Studio

3 February 2017 1:58 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Viewing the short film Hot Winter from Jack Henry Robbins—son of actor Tim Robbins, who is also at the festival this year with Michael Almereyda's Marjorie Prime—you'd be forgiven for thinking you'd stumbled on something that was discovered, not created. With the official title Hot Winter: A Film By Dick Pierre, the short is a fictional, socially conscious pornographic film from bygone times, which Robbins created with now-obsolete VHS cameras and a taste for all things… »

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Four Ways The Entertainment Industry Can Counter Trump’s Narrative of Muslims (Opinion)

2 February 2017 3:29 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Suhad (Sue) Obeidi, Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council’s Hollywood Bureau (Mpac), addresses the next steps for the film and television industries to take after many industry figures denounced the Executive Order targeting predominantly Muslim countries. Obeidi has worked with industry executives to reduce stereotyped depictions of Islam and of Muslims and present more accurate and humanizing portrayals. She also organizes the annual Mpac Media Awards, which salute works from film and TV as well as individuals.

Ever since President Trump signed the Muslim Ban Executive Order, I have seen many representatives of the entertainment industry come together to support a community that the very same industry has vilified for decades.

Having said that, as an American-Muslim woman and the Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council’s Hollywood Bureau, I have been overwhelmed by the support of the industry in standing up for the universal values of freedom, human »

- Sue Obeidi

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Four Ways The Entertainment Industry Can Counter Trump’s Narrative of Muslims (Opinion)

2 February 2017 3:29 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Suhad (Sue) Obeidi, Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council’s Hollywood Bureau (Mpac), addresses the next steps for the film and television industries to take after many industry figures denounced the Executive Order targeting predominantly Muslim countries. Obeidi has worked with industry executives to reduce stereotyped depictions of Islam and of Muslims and present more accurate and humanizing portrayals. She also organizes the annual Mpac Media Awards, which salute works from film and TV as well as individuals.

Ever since President Trump signed the Muslim Ban Executive Order, I have seen many representatives of the entertainment industry come together to support a community that the very same industry has vilified for decades.

Having said that, as an American-Muslim woman and the Director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council’s Hollywood Bureau, I have been overwhelmed by the support of the industry in standing up for the universal values of freedom, »

- Sue Obeidi

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‘Marjorie Prime’ Starring Lois Smith, Jon Hamm, Geena Davis & Tim Robbins Delivers Gentle, Bittersweet Sci-Fi [Rotterdam Review]

2 February 2017 11:57 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

A film this talky is almost inevitably going to have a line or two of dialogue that handily explicates its themes. And sure enough, somewhere in the first act of Michael Almereyda‘s thoughtful, verbose “Marjorie Prime,” Tess (Geena Davis) turns to her husband Jon (Tim Robbins) and relates a theory she’s read which suggests that when we remember something, we don’t remember the actual event but the memory of it.

Continue reading ‘Marjorie Prime’ Starring Lois Smith, Jon Hamm, Geena Davis & Tim Robbins Delivers Gentle, Bittersweet Sci-Fi [Rotterdam Review] at The Playlist. »

- Jessica Kiang

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Jack Henry Robbins Hopes Porno Comedy ‘Hot in Winter’ Will Spur Climate Change Debate (Video)

31 January 2017 5:03 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

One of the better received short films entered into this year’s Sundance Film Festival was “Hot Winter,” an adventure comedy about the world’s leading climate scientist/bodybuilding champion trying to get to the bottom of global warming. And if that sounds like the plot of a porno film, that’s exactly what director Jack Henry Robbins and star Nunzio Randazzo were aiming for. “Nunzio said it best, it’s definitely not the most important film about global warming ever,” Robbins told TheWrap, “but it talks about real issues and actually brings awareness to it.” Also Read: Spotify Tunes Into Original Video, »

- Matt Hejl

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Sundance 2017. Correspondences #5

31 January 2017 2:57 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Golden ExitsDear Lawrence,“How was your day?” you ask. Hmm. Well, we’ve just past the halfway mark of the festival, and I’m only now in step with its routine and rhythm: wake up at 6:45, drive through the blizzardy Canyon between Salt Lake City and Park City, run to the press office, sprint from the headquarters to the first screening of the day, and so on, and so on. Film festivals are hardly work yet they’re hardly a vacation either, and at this point, I’ve lost almost all the ecstatic anticipation I had on the first day. My Sundance has been a constant negotiation of two competing impulses: gratefulness and cynicism, excitement and exhaustion, depression and fulfillment. So, to answer your question, it’s complicated. Alex Ross Perry’s Golden Exits is one of the festival’s most perceptive films about the ambivalence of human behavior (the most would be, »

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Memo to Distributors: Buy These 2017 Sundance Film Festival Movies

31 January 2017 7:41 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Generally speaking, this year’s Sundance Film Festival was a very healthy marketplace that guaranteed many of its highlights will make it to audiences beyond the festival circuit soon. From heavy hitters like “The Big Sick” and “Mudbound” to discoveries like “Thoroughbred,” there was plenty of buyer interest spread throughout the lineup. As usual, though, plenty of worthy titles ended the festival with uncertain futures.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Here are a few memorable ones that deserve distribution.

Bitch

There are plenty of stories about domestic housewives who grow tired of their oppressive routines, but none quite like Marianna Palka’s vicious feminist satire “Bitch,” in which the writer-director-star plays a woman who assumes the identity of a wild dog. It’s a blunt metaphor, but Palka transforms the absurd premise into a chilling look at the destruction »

- David Ehrlich, Eric Kohn and Jude Dry

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Justin Bieber Joins the Starting Line Up for NHL All-Star Celebrity Shootout

27 January 2017 9:58 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Justin Bieber is the latest famous hockey fan to be added to the 2017 NHL All-Star Celebrity Shootout competition, TheWrap has learned. The “Sorry” singer will join fellow Canadian Taylor Kitsch, Alan Thicke’s son Carter, Tim RobbinsDavid Boreanaz and Ross Lynch at the game set to tip off Saturday, Jan. 28 at 2:15 p.m. Pt at Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles. NHL.com and the NHL App will live stream the charity game. Bieber showed his hockey fandom in the U.K last October when he took to the ice during a practice session with the Manchester Storm. »

- Debbie Emery

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‘Marjorie Prime’ Review: Jon Hamm as a Hologram Can’t Save This Lifeless Adaptation — Sundance 2017

25 January 2017 3:52 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“I will remember that now.” Such is the repeated reply from the various “primes” — holograms, and damn fine ones — who populate Michael Almereyda’s “Marjorie Prime,” a big-screen adaptation of Jordan Harrison’s Pulitzer-nominated play about artificial intelligence and the 85-year-old Marjorie, whose handsome companion is programmed to feed the story of her life back to her. Starring acting legend and multiple Tony nominee Lois Smith (reprising the role she originated on stage in 2014) with Jon Hamm, Geena Davis, and Tim Robbins, Almereyda’s feature is rich in acting talent, but this stagey, flat drama can’t match the wattage of its leads.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Awkward pacing and questionable narrative choices pepper the feature, which starts strong and raises bigger questions to which it will return during its otherwise lumpy run. Now in her twilight years, »

- Kate Erbland

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‘Marjorie Prime’ Wins Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Feature Film Prize at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival

25 January 2017 2:21 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Yesterday at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Michael Almereyda’s new film “Marjorie Prime” won the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Feature Film Prize. The Prize is selected by a jury of film and science professionals and presented to outstanding feature films focusing on science or technology as a theme, or depicting a scientist, engineer or mathematician as a major character. The jury presented the award to “Marjorie Prime” for its “imaginative and nuanced depiction of the evolving relationship between humans and technology, and its moving dramatization of how intelligent machines can challenge our notions of identity, memory and mortality.” As a result, the film will receive a $20,000 cash award from the foundation.

Read More: ‘Marjorie Prime’ Exclusive Photo: First Look at Jon Hamm and Lois Smith in Michael Almereyda’s New Film

“We are thrilled to partner with Sundance for the 14th year in a row and award the 2017 Sloan »

- Vikram Murthi

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Make Sundance Great Again: Why Festival Disasters Couldn’t Sink A Slate Filled With Politically Woke Cinema

25 January 2017 1:42 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

From a practical standpoint, the 2017 Sundance Film Festival was a pileup of headaches: The box office got hacked, a power outage forced the cancellation of several screenings, and a massive blizzard wouldn’t stop dumping snow on Main Street. It all took place under the menacing shadow of the presidential inauguration, which no amount of valiant marching could undo.

However, an assessment of the U.S. Sundance narratives throughout this year’s program reveal one of its best in years. Many of the highlights from the 2017 lineup set the stage for a set of new American movies focused on the challenges of unification — and, more specifically, how they stem from family bonds tested by clashing values. Some of the more prominent titles provide a barometer for American society’s greatest anxieties, as well as what it might take chart a path forward.

Sundance’s biggest sale struck a particularly topical note. »

- Eric Kohn

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Sundance Review: ‘Marjorie Prime’ is Contemplative, Micro-Scale Sci-Fi

25 January 2017 6:09 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Humanity’s most invaluable asset is our memory. It fuels our imagination, ignites conversations, and can unite us. It can also be distorted, reshaped, and forgotten altogether. Marjorie Prime, a micro-scale sci-fi chamber drama, fascinatingly explores the perception and dissolution of what we remember throughout our lives. Michael Almereyda’s contemplative new film, which could double as the best-written episode of Black Mirror yet, most poignantly serves as catalyst for a personal self-reflection on the part of the viewer.

Adapted by Almereyda himself from Jordan Harrison’s play, it opens on the 86-year-old Marjorie (Lois Smith) — presumably around the year 2050, based on a pop-culture calculation courtesy of My Best Friend’s Wedding — talking to a man on her couch (Jon Hamm). With his cold, calculated manner of response, we soon learn he’s actually a hologram of her late husband. (Think the most advanced version of Alexa.) Presumably purchased by her child, »

- Jordan Raup

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‘Marjorie Prime’ Wins Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Film Prize – Sundance

24 January 2017 5:48 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Sundance Institute and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation revealed the winners of $60,000 worth of grants today, and Michael Almereyda's Marjorie Prime won the Feature Film Prize. Jon Hamm, Geena Davis, Lois Smith and Tim Robbins star in the film set in a near-future time of artificial intelligence. Marjorie is 86 and has a handsome new companion who looks like her deceased husband and is programmed to feed the story of her life back to her. Jamie Dawson and Howard Gertler’s U… »

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Marjorie Prime’

24 January 2017 12:12 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Does every good play benefit from becoming a movie? In the sense that it brings a broader audience to a hitherto limited-access entertainment, of course. But the camera can have a diminishing effect on some highly expansive stage works — and so it proves in “Marjorie Prime,” a sporadically fascinating but airless adaptation of Jordan Harrison’s Pulitzer-shortlisted study of family, memory, and the artificial intelligence that binds them.  Though it mostly resists contrived “opening-out” devices, and preserves the decidedly low-tech visualization of the play’s sci-fi premise, Michael Almereyda’s well-cast film never finds a suitably complex cinematic language for its tangle of intellectual and emotional ideas, settling instead for serving as a neutrally carpeted showcase for its stars. Fine as they are, and as heartening as it is to see Geena Davis in a rare lead role, it’s hard not to feel a headier opportunity has been missed. »

- Guy Lodge

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43 More Portraits Portraits From TheWrap’s Sundance Studio Presented by Kia (Exclusive Photos)

24 January 2017 12:04 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

  Producer Uri Singer and actors Geena Davis, Tim Robbins, Lois Smith and Jon Hamm, “Marjorie Prime” Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.   Writer-director Shawn Christensen and stars Elle Fanning, Michelle Monaghan, Logan Lerman, Blake Jenner, “Sidney Hall” Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.   Actors Julia Ormond, Martin Donovan and Peter Dinklage with writer-director Mark Palasky, “Rememory” Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap. Actress Shiri Appleby, actress Judy Greer, director Janicza Bravo, actress Nia Long, co-writer-star Brett Gelman, “Lemon” Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap. Actress Alfre Woodard, actor DeRon Horton, writer-director Gerard McMurray, executive producer Common, and actors Tosin Cole and Trevor Jackson, »

- Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

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Us Briefs: 'Marjorie Prime' wins Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Feature prize

23 January 2017 6:26 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Michael Almereyda’s Park City selection has claimed the award for best feature about an elderly woman whose handsome new A.I. companion resembles her late husband.

The jury presented the award to Marjorie Prime for its “imaginative and nuanced depiction of the evolving relationship between humans and technology, and its moving dramatisation of how intelligent machines can challenge our notions of identity, memory and mortality.”

Jon Hamm, Geena Davis, Lois Smith and Tim Robbins star in the Premieres selection.

Paramount Pictures has named Stephen Plum its senior executive vice-president, head of motion picture business and legal affairs. Plum will report to Andrew Gumpert, the newly appointed COO, and work closely with Paramount chairman and CEO Brad Grey. He rejoins Paramount from Twentieth Century Fox where he was executive vice-president, business affairs for the motion picture group since 2003.Philadelphia and Los Angeles-based Breaking Glass Pictures has launched an episodic division and has two pilots in development, and is »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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“Like Nothing Else I Have Shot”: Dp Sean Price Williams on Marjorie Prime

23 January 2017 7:00 AM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Sean Price Williams has become an indomitable force in American independent cinema. Filming regularly on Super 16mm, Williams has served as Dp on the films of Alex Ross Perry (Queen of Earth, Listen Up Philip), Robert Greene (Kate Plays Christine, Actress), Albert Maysles (Iris) and the Safdie brothers (Heaven Knows What). Williams sought to shoot something unlike any of his previous work for his latest feature, Marjorie Prime. With a cast that includes John Hamm, Geena Davis and Tim Robbins, Marjorie Prime is the latest film from writer/director Michael Almereyda. The film will have its world premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Filmmaker: How and […] »

- Filmmaker Staff

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