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Al Pacino Poster

Other Works

  • (October 2002) Plays Arturo Ui in "The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui" by Bertolt Brecht at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (February 25, 1969 - March 29, 1969) "Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?," written by Don Petersen; directed by Michael Schultz; produced by Philip Rose and Huntington Hartford, and in association with Jay Weston; with Michael Brandon (portraying Prince); Bob Christian (portraying Deek); Laura Figueroa (portraying Marietta); Hal Holbrook (portraying Mr. Winters); Lauren Jones (portraying Linda); Catita Lord (portraying Rita); David Opatoshu (portraying Dr. Werner); Al Pacino (portraying Bickham, in his Broadway debut); José Pérez (as Jose Perez) (portraying Ponti); Lázaro Pérez (as Lazaro Perez) (portraying Tonto); Jon Richards(portraying Mr. O'Malley); Roger Robinson (portraying Conrad); Kenneth Rosaly (portraying Hugo); Bruce Scott (portraying Fullendorf); Hector Troy (portraying Raul); M. Emmet Walsh (portraying Ringo); Sam Watson (portraying Lee); on Broadway at the Belasco Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (58 total performances including 19 previews beginning February 5, 1969). Note: Pacini won the 1969 Tony Award for Best Dramatic Actor in a Supporting Role, Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Performance, and Theatre World Award.
  • (January 8, 1970 - February 21, 1970) "Camino Real," drama revival, written by Tennessee Williams, incidental music by Bernardo Segall (as Bernardo Ségall), directed by Milton Katselas and Michael Schultz, on Broadway at the Vivian Beaumont Theatre (52 performances, 13 previews). Cast: Jean-Pierre Aumont (as "Jacques Casanova"), Luis Avalos (as "Waiter/Ensemble"), José Barrera (as "Son"), Ralph Bell (as "A. Ratt"), Paul Benjamin (as "Street Cleaner"), Leta Bonynge (as "Prudence Duvernoy"), Philip Bosco (as "Baron de Charlus"), Victor Buono (as "Gutman"), Nick Cantrell (as "Lobo"), Clifford David (as "Lord Byron"), Ralph Drischell (as "Loan Shark/Voice of the Bum"), Barbara Eda-Young (as "Olympe/Eva"), Michael Enserro (as "Sancho Panza"), Robert Keesler (as "Street Cleaner"), Michael Levin (as "Survivor/Pilot"), Joseph Mascolo (as "Officer"), Patrick McVey (as "Don Quixote"), Michael Miller (as "Guard/Ensemble"), Jean-Daniel Noland (as "Ensemble"), Al Pacino (as "Kilroy"), José Pérez (as "Abdullah"), Priscilla Pointer (as "Lady Mulligan"), Joan Pringle (as "Rosita"), Antonia Rey (as "La Madrecita"), Roberto Reyes (as "The Dreamer"), Robert Riggs (as "Ensemble"), Arthur Sellers (as "Waiter"), Raymond Singer (as "Ensemble"), Arnold Soboloff (as "Nursie"), Barbara Spiegel (as "Ensemble"), Dan Sullivan (as "Navigator/Ensemble"), Robert Symonds (as "Lord Mulligan"), Sylvia Syms (as "The Gypsy"), Jessica Tandy (as "Marguerite Gautier"), Susan Tyrrell (as "Esmeralda/The Gypsy's Daughter"), Sam Umani (as "Guard/Ensemble"). Produced by Repertory Theatre of Lincoln Center (under the direction of Jules Irving).
  • (April 15, 1977 - September 3, 1977) "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel," written by David Rabe, directed by David Wheeler, on Broadway at the Longacre Theatre (128 performances, including 11 previews beginning April 15, 1977). Cast: Al Pacino (as "Pavlo Hummel"), John Aquino (as "Hendrix/Squad"), Don Blakely (as "Jones"), Gary Bolling (as "Burns/Squad/Private Grennel"), Sully Boyar (as "Sergeant Wall"), Larry Bryggman (as "Kress/Squad"), Tisa Chang (as "Yen/Second Viet Cong"), Rebecca Darke (as "Mrs. Hummel"), Michael Dinelli (as "Ryan/Squad"), Joe Fields (as "First Sergeant Tower"), Paul Guilfoyle (as "Hinkle/Squad"), Lance Henriksen (as "Pierce/Squad"), Ron Hunter (as "Mickey"), Gustave Johnson (as "Ardell"), Jack Kehoe (as "Corporal Jackson"), Damien Leake (as "Parham/Squad"), Richard Lynch (as "Sergeant Brisbey"), Andrea Masters (as "Sorrentino"), Kevin Maung (as "Gomez/Squad/Vietnamese Boy/First Viet Cong"), Anne Miyamoto (as "Mamasan/Vietnamese Farmer"), Brad Sullivan (as "Captain Saunders/Captain Miller/Lieutenant Smith"), Max Wright (as "Parker/Squad"). Produced by Moe Septee and Carmen F. Zollo. Note: Won Tony Award and Drama Desk Award for Best Actor in a Play.
  • (May 10, 1979 - July 15, 1979) "King Richard III," historical dramatic revival, written by William Shakespeare, incidental music by Charles Gross, directed by David Wheeler, on Broadway at the Cort Theatre (58 performances, including 25 previews that began on May 10, 1979). Cast: Al Pacino (as "Richard, Duke of Gloucester, afterwards Richard III, brother to the King"), Penelope Allen (as "Lady Anne, widow of Edward, son to King Henry VI, afterward married to Richard"), Gary Bayer, Richard Bright (as "First Murderer/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier"), Larry Bryggman, Dominic Chianese (as "Thomas Rotherham, Archbishop of York/Sir John a Priest/Sir James Tyrrel/Sir William Brandon/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier"), Judson Scott (as "Lord Grey, son to Queen Elizabeth by her first marriage to John Grey/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier/Captain"), Keith Gordon (as "Edward, Prince of Wales, afterwards Edward V son to the King"), Paul Guilfoyle (as "Sir William Catesby"), Laura Harrington [Broadway debut], Richard Jamieson (as "George, Duke of Clarence, brother to the King/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier"), Frederic Kimball (as "Lord Mayor of London, John Morton/Bishop of Ely/ Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier"), John Mahon, Dan Monahan, Bill Moor, Frederick C. Neumann, Rex Robbins (as "Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham"), Harriet Rogers (as "Duchess of York, mother to Edward IV, Gloucester and Clarence"), Jaime Sánchez (as "Sir Richard Ratcliffe/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/ Soldier"), Glenn Scarpelli (as "Richard, Duke of York, younger son to the King"), Linda Selman, Barry Snider, Bruce Waite (as "Sir James Blunt/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier") [Broadway debut], J.T. Walsh (as "Sir Robert Brackenbury, Lieutenant of the Tower/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier") [Broadway debut], Max Wright (as "Second Murderer/Alderman/Bearer/Citizen/Lord/Soldier"), Daniel Zippi. Produced by The Shubert Organization (Gerald Schoenfeld: Chairman; Bernard B. Jacobs: President), Victor Potamkin and Moe Septee; Associate Producer: Porter Van Zandt.
  • (October 1983 - February 1984) Portrayed Walter Cole a.k.a. Teacher, in "American Buffalo," written by David Mamet. On Broadway at the Booth Theatre, New York City, New York, USA. Nominated for Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play. This production also ran at the Kennedy Center For Performing Arts in Washington, DC, and the Duke Of York's Theater in London.
  • (June 1992 - August 1992) Played Harry Levine in "Chinese Coffee," written by Ira Lewis' and Herod Antipas in "Salome" by Oscar Wilde, in repertory, on Broadway at the Circle in the Square Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (August 1996 - November 1996) Played Erie Smith in and directed "Hughie" by Eugene O'Neill on Broadway at the Circle in the Square Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (April 2003 - June 2003) Played Herod Antipas in a staged reading of "Salome" by Oscar Wilde, on Broadway at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (January 1968 - July 1968) Played Murph in "The Indian Wants the Bronx" by Israel Horovitz on Broadway at the Astor Place Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA. NOTE: Won the Obie Award for Best Actor.
  • (1976) Played Graham in "The Local Stigmatic" by Heathcote Williams, Off Broadway at Joseph Papp's Public Theater, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (1966) Played Tiger in "The Peace Creeps" by John Wolfson, Off Broadway at the New Theatre Workshop, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (1966) Played John in "Why Is A Crooked Letter" by Fred Vassi, Off Broadway at Alec Rubin's Theater Of Encounter, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA. NOTE: Pacino was nominated for Obie Award for Best Actor.
  • (1965) Appeared in "The Creditors" by August Strindberg, Off Broadway at The Actors' Gallery, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (1963) Played Young Man in "Hello Out There" by William Saroyan, Off Broadway at the Cafe Cino, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (2003) Public Service Announcement (PSA) TV commercial for the Children's Aid Society (voiceover).
  • (November 1969) Played Graham in "The Local Stigmatic" by Heathcote Williams, Off Broadway at the Actors' Playhouse, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (2003) Played Oedipus Rex in "Oedipus Rex" by Sophocles, Off Broadway at the Daryl Roth Theatre, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (1986 - 1987) Played Marc Antony in "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare Off Broadway at Joseph Papp's New York Shakespeare Festival, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (1979) Played Hamlet in "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare Off Broadway at Joe Papp's New York Shakespeare Festival, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (2005) Public Service Announcement (PSA) TV commercial for The ONE Campaign [www.one.org].
  • (13 November 2010 - Present) Stage: The Merchant of Venice - playing Shylock, at Broadhurst Theatre, New York, USA
  • (1984) He acted in David Mamet's play, "American Buffalo," at the Duke of York's Theatre in London, England with J.J. Johnston and Bruce MacVittie in the cast. Arvin Brown was director.
  • (December 8, 2012 - January 20, 2013) "Glengarry Glen Ross," portraying Shelley Levene in the Broadway revival of David Mamet's play. With Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, John C. McGinley, Richard Schiff, Jeremy Shamos and Murphy Guyer. Direction by Daniel Sullivan, on Broadway at the Schoenfeld Theater, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.
  • (March 2012) TV commercial for 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee (voiceover).
  • (2013) TV commercial for Sky Broadband (voiceover).
  • (June 19 to July 25, 1999) He directed Eugene O'Neill's play, "Hughie," at the Mark Taper Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, California.
  • (October 2, 1980) He acted in David Mamet's play, "American Buffalo," at the Long Wharf Theatre (Mainstage) in New Haven, Connecticut before being transferred to New York City. Arvin Brown was director. Marjorie B. Kellogg was set designer. Bill Walker was costume designer. Ronald Wallace was lighting designer.
  • (Spring 1996) He directed Eugene O'Neill's play, "Hughie," in a Spring bonus production at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Connecticut. David Gallo was set designer. Candice Donnelly was costume designer. Don Holder was lighting designer. John Gromada was sound designer.
  • (Summer 1992) He starred on Broadway alongside Sheryl Lee in Oscar Wilde "Salome", in the Circle in the Square Theatre, under the direction of Robert Allan Ackerman. The play co-starred Suzanne Bertish, Arnold Vosloo and Esai Morales.

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