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15 items from 2007


'Wild' leads pack among SAG Award noms

21 December 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Into the Wild, Sean Penn's study of a young man who ditches civilization for a life on the road, dominates the film nominations for the 14th annual SAG Awards, which were announced Thursday morning.

It scored four noms, including shout-outs for its ensemble cast, Emile Hirsch as best actor, Hal Holbrook as best supporting actor and Catherine Keener as best supporting actress.

In the category of outstanding performance by a cast of a motion picture, "Wild" faces off against 3:10 to Yuma, American Gangster, Hairspray and No Country for Old Men. SAG appears to favor films that have spent weeks, if not months, in release, ignoring such titles as Atonement, Sweeney Todd and The Great Debaters, which are just hitting theaters.

On the TV side, 30 Rock, The Sopranos and Ugly Betty lead the pack with three nominations apiece.

30 Rock and "Ugly Betty" were nominated for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series, where they will compete with "Desperate Housewives", Entourage and The Office. In addition to "The Sopranos", the nominees for best dramatic ensemble are Boston Legal, The Closer, Grey's Anatomy and rookie series Mad Men.

Because the WGA has granted its union ally SAG a waiver to produce the awards show -- which will be broadcast Jan. 27 by TNT and TBS from the Shrine Exposition Center in Los Angeles -- the SAG Awards promise to be one of the few untroubled spots in an embattled awards season.

"Wild", a Paramount Vantage release, was left in the dust when the nominations for Golden Globes were announced last week -- it picked up just two mentions for its score and Eddie Vedder's song "Guaranteed" -- but it roared back to life Thursday as Jeanne Tripplehorn and Terrence Howard announced the SAG picks at a predawn news conference at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood.

"Wild"'s Hirsch, who appears to starve himself in the film as he confronts a harsh Alaska winter, scored his first SAG nom and will compete for best dramatic film actor with George Clooney, who plays a troubled legal fixer in "Michael Clayton"; Daniel-Day Lewis, a ruthless oil baron in "There Will Be Blood"; Ryan Gosling, who romances a real, not-so-live doll in "Lars and the Real Girl"; and Viggo Mortensen, who goes mano a mano with the Russian mob in "Eastern Promises".

For dramatic film actress, the SAG nominating panel of 2,100 guild members stayed loyal to Cate Blanchett for again presiding over Elizabethan England in the sequel "Elizabeth: The Golden Age". Blanchett, who now has been nominated for SAG Awards 11 times, was first nominated in 1999 for "Elizabeth". She also was nominated this year for supporting actress for making like Bob Dylan in "I'm Not There".

In the best actress heat, Blanchett is surrounded by Julie Christie, who drifts off into Alzheimer's in "Away From Her"; Marion Cotillard, who embodies Edith Piaf in "La Vie en Rose"; Angelina Jolie, who plays another real-life woman, Mariane Pearl, in "A Mighty Heart"; and Ellen Page, who stars as a wisecracking pregnant teen in "Juno".

The best supporting male lineup consists of Holbrook, who appears as a lonely retiree in "Wild"; Javier Bardem and Tommy Lee Jones, who represent opposite sides of the law in the same film, "No Country for Old Men"; Casey Affleck, who has a love-hate relationship with a celebrated outlaw in "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford"; and Tom Wilkinson, who suffers a breakdown in "Michael Clayton".

Keener, who teaches Hirsch's character some hard-learned lessons about life on the road in "Wild", is nominated for supporting actress along with Blanchett; Ruby Dee, who plays the crime lord's mom in "American Gangster"; Amy Ryan, who plays another mom caught up in a crisis in "Gone Baby Gone"; and Tilda Swinton, a manipulating corporate attorney in "Michael Clayton".

On the TV side, James Gandolfini and Edie Falco, who each have won two SAG Awards as best dramatic actor and actress for their work in "The Sopranos", are again nominated in those categories for the mob series' cut-to-black final season. »

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London critics like the look of 'Blood'

15 December 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

LONDON -- Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood is nominated in a trio of major categories for this year's London Film Critics' Circle awards.

Anderson's tale of U.S. oil prospectors in a frontier town is nominated for film of the year and director of the year as well as actor of the year for Daniel Day-Lewis.

The nominations were announced Friday.

To win the best film award, Blood will have to fend off the mighty challenge of No Country for Old Men, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Zodiac and The Bourne Ultimatum.

Anderson will slug it out with Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (The Lives of Others), Joel and Ethan Coen (No Country for Old Men), David Fincher (Zodiac) and Cristian Mungiu (4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days) in the fight for director of the year.

Up against Lewis in the actor category are the late Ulrich Muhe (The Lives of Others), Casey Affleck (Jesse James), George Clooney (Michael Clayton) and Tommy Lee Jones (In the Valley of Elah).

Vying for actress of the year are Laura Linney (The Savages), Marion Cotillard (La Vie en Rose), Maggie Gyllenhaal (SherryBaby), Angelina Jolie (A Mighty Heart) and Anamaria Marinca (4 Months).

The London Critics' Circle awards concentrate heavily on U.K. endeavors at the cinema, with eight of the 14 categories exclusively there to reward British talent.

The Attenborough Award for British film of the year will go to either Once, Control, Atonement, Eastern Promises or This Is England.

British director of the year might just go to Dutch-born Anton Corbijn for his stint behind the lens of Control, with challenges from Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Ultimatum), Shane Meadows (This Is England), Joe Wright (Atonement) and Danny Boyle (Sunshine).

The awards will be given out at a ceremony in the British capital Feb. »

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'Atonement' leads Golden Globe noms

14 December 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Complete coverage:

List of nominees

Nominees react

'Massive sweep' for Focus

'Damages' leads TV pack

Strike curbs enthusiasm

"Atonement", the tony British drama of love, lies and war, led the pack with seven nominations -- including best drama and acting noms for its two leads, Keira Knightley and James McAvoy -- as the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. on Thursday morning announced its nominations for the 65th annual Golden Globes.

"Charlie Wilson's War", a comic look at the roots of the U.S.' involvement in Afghanistan, followed with five nominations, including best comedy or musical.

On the TV side, the top contenders with four nominations apiece are the FX dramatic series "Damages", which revolves around a lethal legal case, and the HBO telefilm "Longford", which looked at a crime and its punishment in Great Britain. NBC's comedy "30 Rock", HBO's "Entourage" and ABC's freshman entry "Pushing Daisies" both scored three noms, as did the HBO telefilm "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee".

But this year's wide-open film awards season didn't get much narrower as a result of the Globe nominations as the HFPA chose to include a whopping seven films in its best drama category. In addition to "Atonement", the crowded list includes several looks at criminal behavior, "American Gangster", "Eastern Promises" and "No Country for Old Men"; two very different takes on American business, the oil-struck "There Will Be Blood" and "Michael Clayton", with its corporate intrigue; and the inspirational college drama "The Great Debaters". According to the HFPA, the expanded category came about because three films tied for fifth place.

That should make the competition for prime tables even tougher when the Globes ceremony, broadcast live by NBC, is held Jan. 13 at the Beverly Hilton.

In the case of the best comedy or musical category, the HFPA was a little more selective, nominating three musicals -- the Beatles-inspired "Across the Universe", the '60s-inflected "Hairspray" and the bloody "Sweeney Todd" -- along with two comedy-dramas, "Charlie Wilson's War" and "Juno", a wry look at an unexpected teen pregnancy.

With just five nominations in the best directing category, the contest suddenly got fiercer. On the dramatic side, brother filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen were nominated for "No Country" along with Ridley Scott for "Gangster" and Joe Wright for "Atonement". The only director with a film from the musical category is "Sweeney Todd"'s Tim Burton. The fifth nominee is Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," which also was nominated for best screenplay and best foreign-language film.

Cate Blanchett scored a double-header, picking up a best dramatic actress nom for her regal turn in "Elizabeth: The Golden Age" and supporting actress recognition for her Dylanesque performance in "I'm Not There". With best dramatic actor and supporting actor noms for, respectively, "The Savages" and "Charlie Wilson's War", Philip Seymour Hoffman was much in evidence. Clint Eastwood, though he didn't appear on film this year, also earned two nominations for his score and song for "Grace Is Gone", the study of an Iraq War widower.

Still, for all their largesse, the 82 voting members of the HFPA ignored several possible nominees. Sean Penn's "Into the Wild" was left out in the cold, save for score and song nominations. "Knocked Up" and "Superbad", which were both critical and commercial hits, also got the cold shoulder. Laura Linney, who stars with Hoffman in "Savages", wasn't awarded a nomination like her co-star. Tommy Lee Jones, lauded by critics for performances in both "In the Valley of Elah" and "No Country" wasn't mentioned. And the 3-D "Beowulf" didn't make an appearance in the Globe's new animated feature category, which encompasses just "Bee Movie", "Ratatouille" and "The Simpsons Movie".

With co-productions figuring prominently on both the studio and indie fronts, there were plenty of bragging rights to go around. »

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Spacey To Replace Jones at Nobel Concert

10 December 2007 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Actor Kevin Spacey has stepped in to replace Tommy Lee Jones as host of next week's Nobel Peace Prize concert - after the Men In Black star pulled out. Spacey will now co-host the concert - to be aired across 100 countries worldwide - with actress Uma Thurman in honor of recipients Al Gore and the United Nation's climate change panel. Jones, who was former U.S. vice-president Gore's roommate at Harvard University, pulled out "for personal reasons." Kylie Minogue, Alicia Keys and Annie Lennox are due to perform at the show, which will be held in Oslo, Norway, on December 11 - the day after the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony. Also on the bill are British pop star Kt Tunstall, Earth Wind & Fire, A-ha singer Morten Harket and Junoon, one of Pakistan's most popular rock bands. »

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PMK/HBH boosts three vets

30 November 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Continuing its restructuring among the executive ranks, PMK/HBH Public Relations has promoted company veterans Catherine Olim, Allen Eichhorn and Andy Gelb to executive vps at the firm. Additionally, Melissa Kates, Joy Fehily and Jill Fritzo will assume senior vp titles.

Twenty-six-year company veteran Olim, Kates and Fritzo will oversee day-to-day management of the talent division. Olim will continue to oversee publicity for Nicole Kidman, Glenn Close, Ed Harris and Donald Sutherland, with Kates continuing to manage the business for Katherine Heigl, Shia LaBeouf, Brett Ratner and Calista Flockhart. Fritzo remains the point person for Tommy Lee Jones, Kristin Chenoweth and Vanessa Hudgens.

Eichhorn, who has been in the company's New York office for 26 years and represents such clients as Robert Redford and Kevin Bacon, will take on the mantel of managing the film department with Fehily. Overseeing the film department in Los Angeles, Fehily will continue to rep talent and creators including Gerard Butler, Aaron Sorkin and Joel Silver. »

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Josh Brolin - No Country for Old Men

9 November 2007 6:58 AM, PST | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

The older brother in “Goonies” is probably the most popular role Josh Brolin has ever played. After more than 20 years as an actor on stage and the big screen, that might be changing. Brolin starred in “Grindhouse,” “American Gangster,” “Into the Valley of Elah,” and his biggest role of the year in the Coen brothers’ “No Country for Old Men.” Before we sat down to begin the interview, Brolin looked out the window and said, “ I actually slept well for the first time in about a year last night.” It’s easy to understand why, considering he was getting roles in films like “Into the Blue” and now he’s working with Denzel Washington, Tommy Lee Jones and Russell Crowe. And if you’re curious, even though he looks like a black »

- Jeff Bayer

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In the Valley of Elah

31 August 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This review was written for the theatrical release of "In the Valley of Elah".Paul Haggis has not only avoided the dreaded sophomore slump, but the director and co-writer of the Oscar-winning "Crash" has returned with another bona-fide contender.

Ostensibly a murder-mystery set against the backdrop of the war in Iraq, "In the Valley of Elah" is a deeply reflective, quietly powerful work that is as timely as it is moving.

Further graced by an exceptional Tommy Lee Jones lead performance that would have to be considered one of the finest in the 60-year-old actor's career, the Warner Independent release is getting a little preliminary festival exposure at Venice and Toronto before opening in limited engagements on Sept. 14.

Strong word-of-mouth should ensure that the film plays well into awards season.

For those not up on their Old Testament, "In the Valley of Elah" refers to the place where David slew Goliath. It's an apt metaphor for the battle undertaken by Jones, as a grieving father fighting his way through a bureaucratic quagmire in search of the truth, and by the young men and women who are facing insurmountable odds of emerging physically and/or emotionally unscathed from an increasingly controversial conflict.

Jones' Hank Deerfield is a former military MP who receives a call that his son, Mike Jonathan Tucker, in flashbacks) has gone AWOL after returning from active duty in Iraq. When the elder Deerfield shows up in Albuquerque, N.M., to conduct his own personal investigation, it's subsequently discovered that his son has been a victim of foul play.

In his efforts to find out what really happened, Hank initially butts heads with Emily Sanders (a no-nonsense Charlize Theron), a recently promoted police detective who is fighting a couple of battles of her own -- against the close-knit military brass, and for respect from her colleagues, who make unsubtle intimations about her relationship with her boss (Josh Brolin).

As Hank stubbornly soldiers on, Emily eventually lends her support. As the two begin to piece together the events that led up to Mike's disappearance, Hank is also forced to take stock of his own belief system.

In part an adaptation of a Playboy magazine article by Mark Boal called "Death and Dishonor", the Haggis version is an eloquently written portrait of a man clinging to logic during a time of confusion and turmoil.

With equal amounts bravado, anguish and, ultimately, remorse filling the crevices of his world-weary visage, Jones never has been better; Theron also effectively portrays the multifaceted dimensions of a single mother and small-town detective whose tough exterior conceals a considerable amount of vulnerable self-doubt.

Making the most of the few scenes she has, Susan Sarandon is affecting as Jones' dutiful wife, while Frances Fisher does likewise as a topless bartender who provides Jones with some valuable leads.

Production values are equally accomplished, from cinematographer Roger Deakins' stirring visual compositions to production designer Laurence Bennett's tarnished Americana to Mark Isham's achingly poignant, string-laden score.

IN THE VALLEY OF ELAH

Warner Independent Pictures

Warner Independent Pictures presents in association with Nala Films, Summit Entertainment and Samuels Media, a Blackfriar's Bridge production

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Paul Haggis

Producers: Paul Haggis, Laurence Becsey, Patrick Wachsberger, Steven Samuels, Darlene Caamano Loquet

Executive producers: Emilio Diez Barroso, Bob Hayward, David Garrett, Erik Feig, James Holt, Stan Wlodkowski

Director of photography: Roger Deakins

Production designer: Laurence Bennett

Music: Mark Isham

Costume designer: Lisa Jensen

Editor: Jo Francis

Cast:

Hank Deerfield: Tommy Lee Jones

Det. Emily Sanders: Charlize Theron

Joan Deerfield: Susan Sarandon

Sgt. Carnelli: James Franco

Mike Deerfield: Jonathan Tucker

Evie: Frances Fisher

Lt. Kirklander: Jason Patric

Chief Buchwald: Josh Brolin

Cpl. Penning: Wes Chatham

Running time -- 120 minutes

MPAA rating: R

»

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In the Valley of Elah

31 August 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Paul Haggis has not only avoided the dreaded sophomore slump, but the director and co-writer of the Oscar-winning Crash has returned with another bona-fide contender.

Ostensibly a murder-mystery set against the backdrop of the war in Iraq, In the Valley of Elah is a deeply reflective, quietly powerful work that is as timely as it is moving.

Further graced by an exceptional Tommy Lee Jones lead performance that would have to be considered one of the finest in the 60-year-old actor's career, the Warner Independent release is getting a little preliminary festival exposure at Venice and Toronto before opening in limited engagements on Sept. 14.

Strong word-of-mouth should ensure that the film plays well into awards season.

For those not up on their Old Testament, In the Valley of Elah refers to the place where David slew Goliath. It's an apt metaphor for the battle undertaken by Jones, as a grieving father fighting his way through a bureaucratic quagmire in search of the truth, and by the young men and women who are facing insurmountable odds of emerging physically and/or emotionally unscathed from an increasingly controversial conflict.

Jones' Hank Deerfield is a former military MP who receives a call that his son, Mike Jonathan Tucker, in flashbacks) has gone AWOL after returning from active duty in Iraq. When the elder Deerfield shows up in Albuquerque, N.M., to conduct his own personal investigation, it's subsequently discovered that his son has been a victim of foul play.

In his efforts to find out what really happened, Hank initially butts heads with Emily Sanders (a no-nonsense Charlize Theron), a recently promoted police detective who is fighting a couple of battles of her own -- against the close-knit military brass, and for respect from her colleagues, who make unsubtle intimations about her relationship with her boss (Josh Brolin).

As Hank stubbornly soldiers on, Emily eventually lends her support. As the two begin to piece together the events that led up to Mike's disappearance, Hank is also forced to take stock of his own belief system.

In part an adaptation of a Playboy magazine article by Mark Boal called Death and Dishonor, the Haggis version is an eloquently written portrait of a man clinging to logic during a time of confusion and turmoil.

With equal amounts bravado, anguish and, ultimately, remorse filling the crevices of his world-weary visage, Jones never has been better; Theron also effectively portrays the multifaceted dimensions of a single mother and small-town detective whose tough exterior conceals a considerable amount of vulnerable self-doubt.

Making the most of the few scenes she has, Susan Sarandon is affecting as Jones' dutiful wife, while Frances Fisher does likewise as a bartender who provides Jones with some valuable leads.

Production values are equally accomplished, from cinematographer Roger Deakins' stirring visual compositions to production designer Laurence Bennett's tarnished Americana to Mark Isham's achingly poignant, string-laden score.

IN THE VALLEY OF ELAH

Warner Independent Pictures

Warner Independent Pictures presents in association with Nala Films, Summit Entertainment and Samuels Media, a Blackfriar's Bridge production

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Paul Haggis

Producers: Paul Haggis, Laurence Becsey, Patrick Wachsberger, Steven Samuels, Darlene Caamano Loquet

Executive producers: Emilio Diez Barroso, Bob Hayward, David Garrett, Erik Feig, James Holt, Stan Wlodkowski

Director of photography: Roger Deakins

Production designer: Laurence Bennett

Music: Mark Isham

Costume designer: Lisa Jensen

Editor: Jo Francis

Cast:

Hank Deerfield: Tommy Lee Jones

Det. Emily Sanders: Charlize Theron

Joan Deerfield: Susan Sarandon

Sgt. Carnelli: James Franco

Mike Deerfield: Jonathan Tucker

Evie: Frances Fisher

Lt. Kirklander: Jason Patric

Chief Buchwald: Josh Brolin

Cpl. Penning: Wes Chatham

Running time -- 120 minutes

MPAA rating: R

»

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Toronto lineup taking shape with early picks

23 June 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- Organizers of the Toronto International Film Festival will begin making formal lineup announcements Tuesday, but confirmation of 2007 festival slots is already emerging.

Roger Spottiswoode's "Shake Hands With the Devil", a Canadian drama about the 1994 Rwandan genocide, is now locked, as is the Tommy Lee Jones starrer "No Country for Old Men", Joel and Ethan Coen's Cannes Competition entry about drug dealing on the U.S.-Mexican border.

Also bound for Toronto is "The Flight of the Red Balloon", the Juliette Binoche starrer from Hou Hsiao Hsien that opened Un Certain Regard sidebar in Cannes.

Traditionally, Toronto organizers announce North American premieres that first bowed in Cannes or Berlin, before later in the summer unveiling their world premieres.

Other Toronto picks in September include Cate Blanchett starrer "Elizabeth: The Golden Age", from Shekar Kapoor. The sequel to 1998's "Elizabeth", also directed by Kapoor and starring Blanchett, is set for an Oct. 12 theatrical release.

Also making it onto Toronto's calendar is the Palme d'Or winner "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days", from Romanian director Cristian Mungiu. »

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'Dove' back to air with RHI-Ion deal

20 June 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

RHI Entertainment and Ion Media Networks are firming up the details of their expanded programming partnership announced in May, which will include a new digitally remastered edition of the miniseries Lonesome Dove.

The deal calls for RHI to be the exclusive primetime program supplier for Ion (formerly Pax Network) from 7-11 p.m. Fridays-Sundays. The programming, a mix of movies and miniseries, will include originals and library titles.

The weekends, dubbed RHI Movie Weekend, kick off June 29. Dove. is set to premiere from 9-11 p.m. June 30 and continue July 7, 14 and 21. The mini stars Robert Duvall, Anjelica Huston, Tommy Lee Jones, Diane Lane, Danny Glover and Chris Cooper.

The premiere weekend also will feature Broken Vows, starring Jones and Annette O'Toole (7-9 p.m. June 29), and Cleopatra, starring Timothy Dalton, Billy Zane and Leonor Varela (7-11 p.m. July 1).

Other titles include The Twilight of the Golds, starring Faye Dunaway, Brendan Fraser, Gary Marshall, Rosie O'Donnell and Jennifer Beals. »

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As Berlinale wraps, eyes turn to Cannes

7 May 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With the jury still out on where this year's Berlin lineup will rate on the Dieter meter, attention is beginning to focus on the selection for the Festival de Cannes.

The Riviera event marks its 60th anniversary when it unspools May 16-27, suggesting fest president Gilles Jacob will want to inject some extra glitz. But artistic director Thierry Fremaux said the landmark will not influence his choice of movies for Competition.

After the poor reception given to last year's opener The Da Vinci Code, pressure is on to find a more crowd-pleasing title. One option under consideration is the hugely ambitious documentary "earth," which offers a dazzling look at natural life on our planet.

"We're already speaking to Cannes about being the opening film. We're sending an unfinished mix to Cannes at the end of February," said Sophokles Tasioulis of Greenlight Media, who co-produced the movie with the BBC. The movie is distributed in France by Gaumont, which has previously handled opening-night duties with The Fifth Element and Vatel.

A more conventional contender is Ocean's Thirteen from Palme d'Or winner Steven Soderbergh. And one that would allow for a top-flight red carpet gala given the Warner Bros. picture's all-star cast headed by George Clooney, Matt Damon, Brad Pitt and Al Pacino.

Warner's Iraq-themed movie The Valley of Elah written and directed by Paul Haggis starring Tommy Lee Jones, Charlize Theron and James Franco is also in the running. "It's not out of the question," said a source.

Although it is still too early for titles to have received any locked-down slots, Fremaux looks to have a good choice of titles from both the U.S. and France.

Among the former is Cannes golden boy Quentin Tarantino's exploitation double-feature Grind House, co-directed by Robert Rodriguez.

Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End is one possible for out of Competition. Paramount Pictures' fantasy adventure Stardust, starring Claire Danes, Robert De Niro, Sienna Miller and Michelle Pfeiffer, may also show up. »

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Aaron Eckhart Lands Two-Faced Role

21 February 2007 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Thank You For Smoking star Aaron Eckhart will play Harvey Dent/Two-Face in The Dark Knight, a sequel to Batman Begins. Dent is Gotham City's district attorney and a Batman ally who goes insane after half of his face is disfigured by acid. Known as Two-Face, he chooses to do good or evil by flipping a coin. Tommy Lee Jones played the character in 1995's Batman Forever. Ray Oscar winner Jamie Foxx recently rubbished reports he would play Dent alongside Christian Bale's Batman. The sequel, directed by Christopher Nolan, is set to be released next summer. The actor is next set to be seen in drama No Reservations opposite Catherine Zeta-Jones and recent Oscar nominee Abigail Breslin. »

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Eckhart joining 'Dark Knight' cast

16 February 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Aaron Eckhart is in final negotiations to play Harvey Dent/Two Face in The Dark Knight, Warner Bros. Pictures' sequel to Batman Begins.

In Batman lore, Dent is the district attorney of Gotham City and an ally of Batman. After half his face is disfigured by acid, Dent becomes the insane crime boss known as Two Face. He chooses to do good or evil by flipping a coin. Tommy Lee Jones played the character in 1995's Batman Forever.

Knight sees Christopher Nolan back in the director's chair with Christian Bale reprising his role as Bruce Wayne/Batman. Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Gary Oldman are also returning. Heath Ledger joined the cast last summer, signing up to play the sardonic and murderous villain the Joker.

The script was written by Nolan's brother, Jonathan, from a story by Christopher Nolan and David Goyer. Producing are Emma Thomas, Charles Roven and Christopher Nolan.

Eckhart is riding high these days thanks to his acclaimed performance in Thank You for Smoking, which nabbed him Golden Globe and Spirit Award nominations. »

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As Berlinale wraps, eyes turn to Cannes

15 February 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With the jury still out on where this year's Berlin lineup will rate on the Dieter meter, attention is beginning to focus on the selection for the Festival de Cannes.

The Riviera event marks its 60th anniversary when it unspools May 16-27, suggesting fest president Gilles Jacob will want to inject some extra glitz. But artistic director Thierry Fremaux said the landmark will not influence his choice of movies for Competition.

After the poor reception given to last year's opener "The Da Vinci Code", pressure is on to find a more crowd-pleasing title. One option under consideration is the hugely ambitious documentary "earth," which offers a dazzling look at natural life on our planet.

"We're already speaking to Cannes about being the opening film. We're sending an unfinished mix to Cannes at the end of February," said Sophokles Tasioulis of Greenlight Media, who co-produced the movie with the BBC. The movie is distributed in France by Gaumont, which has previously handled opening-night duties with "The Fifth Element" and "Vatel".

A more conventional contender is "Ocean's Thirteen" from Palme d'Or winner Steven Soderbergh. And one that would allow for a top-flight red carpet gala given the Warner Bros. picture's all-star cast headed by George Clooney, Matt Damon, Brad Pitt and Al Pacino.

Warner's Iraq-themed movie "The Valley of Elah" written and directed by Paul Haggis starring Tommy Lee Jones, Charlize Theron and James Franco is also in the running. "It's not out of the question", said a source.

Although it is still too early for titles to have received any locked-down slots, Fremaux looks to have a good choice of titles from both the U.S. and France.

Among the former is Cannes golden boy Quentin Tarantino's exploitation double-feature "Grind House", co-directed by Robert Rodriguez.

Disney's "Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End" is one possible for out of Competition. Paramount Pictures' fantasy adventure "Stardust", starring Claire Danes, Robert De Niro, Sienna Miller and Michelle Pfeiffer, may also show up. »

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Bof: Tromsø International Film Festival

13 January 2007 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Ioncinema.com presents: Best of Fests Tromsø International Film Festival When: January 16th to 21st, 2007 Counting Down: updateCountdownClock('January 16, 2007'); Where: Location: Tromsø, NorwayOfficial Website: http://www.tiff.no/What: Tiff is a popular film festival for our audience, and at the same time an important meeting point for Norwegian and international film industry. TIFF07 will be Tromsø's 17th international film festival. Tromsø International Film Festival had in 2006 a total admission of 44 804. This makes Tiff Norway' largest festival.Accredited: No  Film Line Up:Opening NightSPANDEXMAN - Bobbie Peers, 2007Winterland - Hisham Zaman, 2006Closing NightONCE In A Lifetime - John Dower, Paul Crowder, 2005Competition ProgramBORDERPOST - Rajko Grlic , 2006Born And Bred - Pablo Trapero , 2006Chronicle Of An Escape - Isreal Adrián Caetano, 2006Colossal Youth - Pedro Costa, 2006Family Ties - Kim Tae-Yong, 2006Glue - Alexis Dos Santos, 2005Gypo - Jan Dunn, 2005Longing - Valeska Grisebach, 2006Lucy - Henner Winckler, 2006Requiem - »

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15 items from 2007


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