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Ron Howard Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trade Mark (4) | Trivia (34) | Personal Quotes (18) | Salary (3)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 1 March 1954Duncan, Oklahoma, USA
Birth NameRonald William Howard
Height 5' 9" (1.75 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Ron was born in Oklahoma, into an acting family - his father had realized a boyhood dream of acting by attending the University of Oklahoma and majoring in drama, and his mother went through acting school in New York. He was in his first movie at 18 months, Frontier Woman (1956), although his first real part was at the age of 4. Soon a regular on Playhouse 90 (1956), he was cast as Opie on The Andy Griffith Show (1960), and later moved from a child in Mayberry to America's teenager as Richie Cunningham in Happy Days (1974). The life of a child star is certainly not routine, but Ron's parents wanted his life to be as normal as possible - he attended public schools and at age 15 even took nine months off to play a basketball season. The transition from child actor to adult actor is always difficult, but for Ron the real transition was from child actor to adult director. There were some film roles, such as The Shootist (1976) for which he received a Golden Globe nomination, but his dream and now his focus was directing. He had begun shooting films at age 15 with a Super-8 camera, and after high school spent two years in a film program at the University of Southern California, but then left, feeling he could learn more from actual experience. That first film was the hardest to finance, but he struck a deal with Roger Corman - he would star in Eat My Dust (1976) and Corman would produce Grand Theft Auto (1977) which Howard would direct (he also wrote the script and starred). It was a success, and his directorial career was jump-started. Married since 1975 to his high school sweetheart, he, in 1997, is enjoying a life of telling stories as one of Hollywood's top directors.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Bruce Cameron <dumarest@midcoast.com>

Spouse (1)

Cheryl Howard (7 June 1975 - present) (4 children)

Trade Mark (4)

Frequently casts father Rance Howard and brother Clint Howard in supporting roles.
Frequently uses music by James Horner and songs by 'Randy Newman'
Works in multiple genres - comedy (Splash (1984), Gung Ho (1986)), drama (Apollo 13 (1995), A Beautiful Mind (2001), Frost/Nixon (2008)), thriller (The Da Vinci Code (2006), _Angels and Demons (2009)_), fantasy (Willow (1988), How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000)) and western (_The Missing (2003)_).

Trivia (34)

In 1971, was a contestant on The Dating Game (1965) and ended up choosing Bachelorette #2, Nola Green.
Son of actor/director Rance Howard and actress Jean Speegle Howard.
Older brother of Clint Howard.
Went to Burroughs High School with actress Rene Russo.
Daughters: Bryce Dallas Howard (b. 1981), Jocelyn Carlyle (twin, b. 1985), Paige Howard (twin, b. 1985). Son: Reed Cross (b. 1987).
All of Howard's four children are named after the places they were conceived: Bryce Dallas in Dallas, Texas, Paige Carlyle and Jocelyn Carlyle at the Hotel Carlyle in New York City, and Reed Cross after a specific road, according to Bryce Dallas Howard.
Acted with Kathleen Quinlan in American Graffiti (1973), then directed her in Apollo 13 (1995).
Cast both of his parents in Apollo 13 (1995). Daughter, Bryce Dallas Howard, also had a cameo appearance.
Had the following rankings on Premiere's annual Power 100 List - #22 in 2006, #27 in 2005, #30 in 2004, #26 in 2003, #29 in 2002.
Recipient of a (USA) National Medal of Arts, 2003.
Directed 8 different actors in Oscar-nominated performances: Don Ameche, Dianne Wiest, Ed Harris, Kathleen Quinlan, Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly, Paul Giamatti, and Frank Langella. Ameche and Connelly won Oscars for their performances in one of Howard's movies.
Ranked #7 in Vh1's of the "100 Greatest Kid Stars".
Is apparently a big fan of cricket. Attended the final Ashes test match between England vs. Australia on 12th September 2005 whilst filming The Da Vinci Code (2006), and was spotted mingling with players in the Australian dressing room.
When he was a child actor, his father was very involved in his career, protecting him from unfair treatment, and being strict with him (when necessary).
He was awarded the National Medal of Arts from the National Endowment of the Arts in 2003.
Has directed two films on the American Film Institute's 100 Most Inspiring Movies of All Time. They are A Beautiful Mind (2001) at #93 and Apollo 13 (1995) at #12.
Father-in-law of Seth Gabel.
Played Winthrop Paroo in The Music Man (1962), and the title role in Huckleberry Finn (1975). Both roles were previously played by Eddie Hodges.
He has German, English, Welsh, and Scottish ancestry.
Became a grandfather when his daughter, Bryce Dallas Howard, had a baby boy on February 16, 2007.
Was interested in directing Eye See You (2002) at one point, but decided to direct How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000).
Stepson of L.A. Times columnist and playwright Judy Howard.
In 2007, Forbes Magazine estimated his 2006 earnings to be approximately $35 million.
Henry Winkler is the godfather of Howard's daughter Bryce Dallas Howard.
Best known on TV for his starring roles as Opie Taylor on The Andy Griffith Show (1960) and as Richard "Richie" Cunningham on Happy Days (1974).
Started two production companies - Major H Productions (which ran until 1985) and then, in 1985, Imagine Films Entertainment.
Has cast three fellow cast members of the American Graffiti movies in films he later directed. Kathleen Quinlan appeared in Apollo 13 (1995), Delroy Lindo appeared in Ransom (1996), and Scott Glenn appeared in Backdraft (1991).
As of July, 2012, after the death of Andy Griffith on July 3, 2012, Don Knotts on February 24, 2006, and George Lindsey (Goober) on May 12, 2012, 'Ron Howard (I) is the youngest regular cast member, and one of only three regular or recurring (over 20 episodes portraying the same character) surviving cast members of The Andy Griffith Show (1960), along with surviving cast members Jim Nabors (Gomer), and Betty Lynn (Thelma Lou).
Profiled in "American Classic Screen Interviews" (Scarecrow Press).
With the death of his longtime friend and mentor Andy Griffith on July 3, 2012, he's the only original and youngest surviving cast member of The Andy Griffith Show (1960).
Acting mentors were Andy Griffith, Shirley Jones and Tom Bosley.
Shares the same birthday with Catherine Bach.
He has played the same character (Richie Cunningham) in four different series: Love, American Style (1969), Happy Days (1974), Laverne & Shirley (1976) and The Fonz and the Happy Days Gang (1980).
Currently resides in the Sea Pines Resort on Hilton Head Island in South Carolina. [January 2006]

Personal Quotes (18)

[asked about the transition from child star to adolescent actor] You're 14 or 15, and they can hire an 18-year-old and not have the child-labor law restrictions, and so they do. Just at the point when you're feeling confused and vulnerable, you're being rejected.
It was always my dream to be a director. A lot of it had to do with controlling my own destiny, because as a young actor you feel at everyone's disposal. But I wanted to become a leader in the business.
[asked what his future holds in 1979] If I had to choose between a great acting job and a good directing job, I'd choose the directing job.
I've always been interested in the Depression as this very dramatic pivotal period in American history. My dad grew up on a farm in Oklahoma and remembers playing with his toy tractor under the table while the local farmers talked with his grandfather about forming a local militia to protect the crops because they were afraid unemployed people from the town would come in and grab the crops.
There is something inherently tough about Americans. They will not accept defeat. The astronauts of Apollo 13 (1995) would not give up, John Nash in A Beautiful Mind (2001) would not give up, and Jimmy Braddock [subject of Cinderella Man (2005)] would not surrender to poverty.
I've acted with all types, I've directed all types. What you want to understand as a director, is what actors have to offer. They'll get at it however they get at it. If you can understand that, you can get your work done.
I'm not a caterer. I just have to stay with my creative convictions. At some point, you have to just get past the special-interest groups and do what you're there to do, which is make a movie.
[about A Beautiful Mind (2001)] It was always our goal to try to present schizophrenia in a very personal way. So the delusional characters are symbols, you know, manifestations. It's all a bit more allegorical, it's not pure case study, it's not a clinical presentation.
[on the death of Don Knotts] Outside of his loving family, I'm sure that Andy Griffith was Don Knotts' greatest fan. When I summon up memories of working with Don on The Andy Griffith Show (1960), the first images are of Andy laughing and reveling in Don's genius. Don had been funny before the show and sustained his comedy superstardom later in movies and on TV. But I will always remember the transformation that would begin as mild-mannered Don rehearsed his scene, tweaked the dialogue, refined the timing - and then took off and soared as cameras rolled. The only question: Could Andy keep from falling out of his chair laughing in the middle of the take? Nine times out of 10, Andy, the consummate pro, held on until the director yelled 'Cut!' and he and the rest of us could finally release the pressure valve and let the laughter out. On the rare times when Andy would blow the take, he was always forgiven - even by Don, who knew deep down there was plenty more comedy where that came from.
[on the death of Bea Arthur]: What she did in television and the characters that she created broke new ground, and she was a great artist.
[on his longtime friendship with Andy Griffith, who played Sheriff Andy Taylor] I wondered about Andy, I knew he was a Southern Democrat, old school, Southern Democrat. I really hadn't talked to him about politics in ages, and I barely got the sentence out; and he said, "I'm a Democrat. I believe in [President Barack Obama]. We need a Democrat in the White House. I want Obama, and I'll do it". I talk to him every so often.
[Of Andy Griffith]: In "Funny or Die", the website where it helped produced that piece and put it on their Website, and the meeting was getting a lot of action, and getting a lot of hits and also comments, and most were good and found it funny, and even if they didn't agree with the message, they appreciate it. Some were angry and irate, and I called Andy, and I said 'I don't know if you're on the internet, or if you follow this thing. It's getting a lot of attention.' Andy said, 'Yeah, I had a couple of reporters called, and kinds picked up on that.' I said, 'It's mostly good, but you know, some people are pretty angry about this --- some people are pretty upset. And there was a pause ... and he said, 'Well, Ronnie, once in a while, you gotta muffle a few feathers.' He's still giving Opie, a little advice.
real-life characters in Rush (2013)] I wanted to show the slightly tragic side of these two guys. They were so desperate to fill whatever void that was, and to prove something to who knows who, starting with themselves, that they were willing to risk their lives.
Rush (2013)] I guess you could say it's a bit of a stretch. But at this point, I don't know what does sound like a Ron Howard film. I'm just looking for interesting filmmaking challenges and stories that have a chance to surprise the audience. When I started, I didn't know much about Formula One, but I knew that it was cool, sexy and dangerous, and that's a pretty good combination.
[on preparing his actors to look comfortable as Formula One drivers] That was something they were going to have to be good at, because you have to have enough command of the car to come driving in fast, hot, with people there and pull in to a precise spot. And I wanted to be able to move the camera in and have them flip the visor up and see they were driving. It was the one place you could confirm to people that they were.
[on working with Bette Davis] She didn't much like that there was this 25 -year-old from a sitcom that was directing her. I was talking to her on the phone and I said, 'Well, Ms. Davis, I'll protect you as the director and make sure you're prepared and that your performance will not suffer', and she said, 'I disagree, Mr. Howard'. I said, 'Ms. Davis, just call me Ron', and she said, 'No, I will call you Mr. Howard until I decide whether I like you or not'. And then [on the set] I gave her a note. And she tried it, and it worked for her. She said, 'You're right, that works much better. Let's shoot'. And at the end of the whole thing, I said, 'We'll, Ms. Davis, great first day. I'll see you tomorrow'. She said, 'Okay, Ron, see you tomorrow' and she patted me on the ass.
[on the current state of cinema, 2014] I really think the creative process is more exciting than ever. There are more and more people doing great work.
[on being receptive to new ideas in filmmaking] Why fight technology at all? The audience is always going to tell you what they like best. And you, as a storyteller, as a communicator, are going to be required to adjust to that. Your taste, your aesthetic, is certainly going to influence that, and you may choose to diffuse it - maybe decline using that format. At the end of the day, if I think the story has value and that it's interesting, then my next job is trying to understand how to best tell the story.

Salary (3)

Eat My Dust (1976) $100,000 + %
A Beautiful Mind (2001) $10,000,000
The Dilemma (2011) $10,000,000

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