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15 items from 2005


Firth hands Oxfam trade petition to EU

5 December 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

BRUSSELS -- British actor Colin Firth handed a petition signed by ten million people to Europe's trade chief Monday, urging him to secure a trade deal next week to help the world's poorest countries. Firth gave the 'Big Noise' petition -- organized by aid group Oxfam -- to European Union trade commissioner Peter Mandelson in Brussels. The actor, who has starred in such films as Bridget Jones's Diary and Love Actually, called on the ministers meeting at the World Trade Organization talks in Hong Kong next week to end the "simply intolerable" system of subsidies, tariffs and food dumping by rich nations that is blamed for impeding the development of poor countries. »

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Pride & Prejudice

18 November 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This review was written for the festival screening of "Pride & Prejudice."

LONDON -- It's no wonder a great deal of the publicity for the new screen version of "Pride & Prejudice" boasts of its gorgeous settings and scenery, for they are by far the best things about a film that turns Jane Austen's nimble satire into a lumbering gothic romance.

Director Joe Wright and screenwriter Deborah Moggach seem to have confused Austen with the Bronte sisters, as their story pits star-crossed lovers against a backdrop of fierce landscapes and harsh storms. By robbing the story of its intricate framework of late 18th century social observation, the love affair descends into ponderous melodrama.

With the BBC's 1995 miniseries starring Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle still regarded as the definitive treatment of the book, it will be an uphill struggle to win audiences to what is neither a faithful rendition nor a very interesting new interpretation.

Everything feels rushed about the story as the five Bennet sisters, and their screechingly vulgar mother and indulgent father learn of the arrival at a local mansion of the wealthy and eligible Charles Bingley. Mrs. Bennet (Brenda Blethyn) is keen to marry her daughters off to well-heeled gentlemen, and she is mightily encouraged when, at a local ball, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) fills the dance card of her eldest daughter, Jane (Rosamund Pike).

That evening, the daughter next in line, Elizabeth (Keira Knightley), encounters a friend of Bingley, the gloweringly superior Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen), who not only rudely declines to dance but also is overheard belittling Elizabeth and the rest of the Bennet clan.

The familiar Austen plot is put on fast-forward as the odious Mr. Collins (Tom Hollander), who will inherit the Bennet home, arrives seeking a wife, and a regiment pulls into town, including the dubious Mr. Wickham (Rupert Friend), who always has an eye for the main chance.

Several of the best-known scenes from the novel are included, but the passage of the love affairs between Jane and Bingley and Elizabeth and Darcy play out with no rhyme or reason as the whole point of Austen's satire -- the English class system, especially as it treated women -- is given short shrift.

The brilliant humor of Mr. Collins' groveling snobbery is skipped, and there's no hint of a relationship between Elizabeth and Mr. Wickham. The imperious Lady Catherine de Bourg, played at full throttle by Judy Dench, is given more time than necessary, and little is asked of Donald Sutherland, as Mr. Bennet, other than to be grumpily docile.

MacFadyen, a fine actor, is barely given a chance to compete with the memory of Firth's Darcy as, lacking the superb script of the BBC show, he is asked to do little more than appear handsomely annoyed. Knightley, giggly and juvenile, shows no sign of being up to the task of playing a woman with Elizabeth's intelligence and wisdom. Lacking Austen's subtle and witty insights, there has to be a reason for Darcy to fall in love with Elizabeth, but in this film you cannot imagine why.

PRIDE & PREJUDICE

Focus Features presents in association with Studio Canal a Working Title production

Credits:

Director: Joe Wright

Screenplay based on the novel by Jane Austen: Deborah Moggach

Producers: Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster

Executive producers: Debra Hayward, Liza Chasen

Co-producer: Jane Frazer

Director of photography: Roman Osin

Production designer: Sarah Greenwood

Editor: Paul Tothill

Music: Dario Marianelli

Cast:

Elizabeth Bennet: Keira Knightley

Mr. Darcy: Matthew MacFadyen

Mrs. Bennet: Brenda Blethyn

Mr. Bennet: Donald Sutherland

Mr. Collins: Tom Hollander

Jane Bennett: Rosamund Pike

Lydia Bennet: Jenna Malone

Lady Catherine de Bourg: Judi Dench

Charles Bingley: Simon Woods

Caroline Bingley: Kelly Reilly

Mr. Wickham: Rupert Friend

Charlotte Lucas: Claudie Blakley

Col. Fitzwilliam: Cornelius Booth

Georgiana Darcy: Tamzin Merchant

Kitty Bennet: Carey Mulligan

Mary Bennet: Talulah Riley

Mrs. Gardiner: Penelope Wilton

Mr. Gardiner: Peter Wright

MPAA rating PG »

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Pride & Prejudice

10 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Screened at the Toronto International Film Festival

LONDON -- It's no wonder a great deal of the publicity for the new screen version of Pride & Prejudice boasts of its gorgeous settings and scenery, for they are by far the best things about a film that turns Jane Austen's nimble satire into a lumbering gothic romance.

Director Joe Wright and screenwriter Deborah Moggach seem to have confused Austen with the Bronte sisters, as their story pits star-crossed lovers against a backdrop of fierce landscapes and harsh storms. By robbing the story of its intricate framework of late 18th century social observation, the love affair descends into ponderous melodrama.

With the BBC's 1995 miniseries starring Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle still regarded as the definitive treatment of the book, it will be an uphill struggle to win audiences to what is neither a faithful rendition nor a very interesting new interpretation.

Everything feels rushed about the story as the five Bennet sisters, and their screechingly vulgar mother and indulgent father learn of the arrival at a local mansion of the wealthy and eligible Charles Bingley. Mrs. Bennet (Brenda Blethyn) is keen to marry her daughters off to well-heeled gentlemen, and she is mightily encouraged when, at a local ball, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) fills the dance card of her eldest daughter, Jane (Rosamund Pike).

That evening, the daughter next in line, Elizabeth (Keira Knightley), encounters a friend of Bingley, the gloweringly superior Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen), who not only rudely declines to dance but also is overheard belittling Elizabeth and the rest of the Bennet clan.

The familiar Austen plot is put on fast-forward as the odious Mr. Collins (Tom Hollander), who will inherit the Bennet home, arrives seeking a wife, and a regiment pulls into town, including the dubious Mr. Wickham (Rupert Friend), who always has an eye for the main chance.

Several of the best-known scenes from the novel are included, but the passage of the love affairs between Jane and Bingley and Elizabeth and Darcy play out with no rhyme or reason as the whole point of Austen's satire -- the English class system, especially as it treated women -- is given short shrift.

The brilliant humor of Mr. Collins' groveling snobbery is skipped, and there's no hint of a relationship between Elizabeth and Mr. Wickham. The imperious Lady Catherine de Bourg, played at full throttle by Judy Dench, is given more time than necessary, and little is asked of Donald Sutherland, as Mr. Bennet, other than to be grumpily docile.

MacFadyen, a fine actor, is barely given a chance to compete with the memory of Firth's Darcy as, lacking the superb script of the BBC show, he is asked to do little more than appear handsomely annoyed. Knightley, giggly and juvenile, shows no sign of being up to the task of playing a woman with Elizabeth's intelligence and wisdom. Lacking Austen's subtle and witty insights, there has to be a reason for Darcy to fall in love with Elizabeth, but in this film you cannot imagine why.

PRIDE & PREJUDICE

Universal Pictures presents in association with Studio Canal a Working Title production

Credits:

Director: Joe Wright

Screenplay based on the novel by Jane Austen: Deborah Moggach

Producers: Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster

Executive producers: Debra Hayward, Liza Chasen

Co-producer: Jane Frazer

Director of photography: Roman Osin

Production designer: Sarah Greenwood

Editor: Paul Tothill

Music: Dario Marianelli

Cast:

Elizabeth Bennet: Keira Knightley

Mr. Darcy: Matthew MacFadyen

Mrs. Bennet: Brenda Blethyn

Mr. Bennet: Donald Sutherland

Mr. Collins: Tom Hollander

Jane Bennett: Rosamund Pike

Lydia Bennet: Jenna Malone

Lady Catherine de Bourg: Judi Dench

Charles Bingley: Simon Woods

Caroline Bingley: Kelly Reilly

Mr. Wickham: Rupert Friend

Charlotte Lucas: Claudie Blakley

Col. Fitzwilliam: Cornelius Booth

Georgiana Darcy: Tamzin Merchant

Kitty Bennet: Carey Mulligan

Mary Bennet: Talulah Riley

Mrs. Gardiner: Penelope Wilton

Mr. Gardiner: Peter Wright

MPAA rating PG »

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Pride & Prejudice

9 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Screened at the Toronto International Film Festival

LONDON -- It's no wonder a great deal of the publicity for the new screen version of "Pride & Prejudice" boasts of its gorgeous settings and scenery, for they are by far the best things about a film that turns Jane Austen's nimble satire into a lumbering gothic romance.

Director Joe Wright and screenwriter Deborah Moggach seem to have confused Austen with the Bronte sisters, as their story pits star-crossed lovers against a backdrop of fierce landscapes and harsh storms. By robbing the story of its intricate framework of late 18th century social observation, the love affair descends into ponderous melodrama.

With the BBC's 1995 miniseries starring Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle still regarded as the definitive treatment of the book, it will be an uphill struggle to win audiences to what is neither a faithful rendition nor a very interesting new interpretation.

Everything feels rushed about the story as the five Bennet sisters, and their screechingly vulgar mother and indulgent father learn of the arrival at a local mansion of the wealthy and eligible Charles Bingley. Mrs. Bennet (Brenda Blethyn) is keen to marry her daughters off to well-heeled gentlemen, and she is mightily encouraged when, at a local ball, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) fills the dance card of her eldest daughter, Jane (Rosamund Pike).

That evening, the daughter next in line, Elizabeth (Keira Knightley), encounters a friend of Bingley, the gloweringly superior Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen), who not only rudely declines to dance but also is overheard belittling Elizabeth and the rest of the Bennet clan.

The familiar Austen plot is put on fast-forward as the odious Mr. Collins (Tom Hollander), who will inherit the Bennet home, arrives seeking a wife, and a regiment pulls into town, including the dubious Mr. Wickham (Rupert Friend), who always has an eye for the main chance.

Several of the best-known scenes from the novel are included, but the passage of the love affairs between Jane and Bingley and Elizabeth and Darcy play out with no rhyme or reason as the whole point of Austen's satire -- the English class system, especially as it treated women -- is given short shrift.

The brilliant humor of Mr. Collins' groveling snobbery is skipped, and there's no hint of a relationship between Elizabeth and Mr. Wickham. The imperious Lady Catherine de Bourg, played at full throttle by Judy Dench, is given more time than necessary, and little is asked of Donald Sutherland, as Mr. Bennet, other than to be grumpily docile.

MacFadyen, a fine actor, is barely given a chance to compete with the memory of Firth's Darcy as, lacking the superb script of the BBC show, he is asked to do little more than appear handsomely annoyed. Knightley, giggly and juvenile, shows no sign of being up to the task of playing a woman with Elizabeth's intelligence and wisdom. Lacking Austen's subtle and witty insights, there has to be a reason for Darcy to fall in love with Elizabeth, but in this film you cannot imagine why.

PRIDE & PREJUDICE

Universal Pictures presents in association with Studio Canal a Working Title production

Credits:

Director: Joe Wright

Screenplay based on the novel by Jane Austen: Deborah Moggach

Producers: Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Paul Webster

Executive producers: Debra Hayward, Liza Chasen

Co-producer: Jane Frazer

Director of photography: Roman Osin

Production designer: Sarah Greenwood

Editor: Paul Tothill

Music: Dario Marianelli

Cast:

Elizabeth Bennet: Keira Knightley

Mr. Darcy: Matthew MacFadyen

Mrs. Bennet: Brenda Blethyn

Mr. Bennet: Donald Sutherland

Mr. Collins: Tom Hollander

Jane Bennett: Rosamund Pike

Lydia Bennet: Jenna Malone

Lady Catherine de Bourg: Judi Dench

Charles Bingley: Simon Woods

Caroline Bingley: Kelly Reilly

Mr. Wickham: Rupert Friend

Charlotte Lucas: Claudie Blakley

Col. Fitzwilliam: Cornelius Booth

Georgiana Darcy: Tamzin Merchant

Kitty Bennet: Carey Mulligan

Mary Bennet: Talulah Riley

Mrs. Gardiner: Penelope Wilton

Mr. Gardiner: Peter Wright

MPAA rating PG »

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Egoyan Loses Threesome Appeal

9 September 2005 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

The producers of director Atom Egoyan's controversial new film Where The Truth Lies have lost their appeal to overturn the restrictive NC-17 rating the movie was awarded. The film, which premieres at the Toronto Film Festival in Canada next week, features a threesome sex scene between Kevin Bacon, Colin Firth and Rachel Blanchard, which censors have deemed "sexually explicit." Thrusting in the scene required the rarely used NC-17 rating, usually reserved for the most overtly controversial movies. The rating means no one under age 17 can see the film in theatres. Egoyan and Blanchard appeared before censors in Los Angeles on Wednesday to boost the appeal but a panel of judges refused to be swayed. Egoyan insists the rating is "an unwarranted response given the story it's telling and the way it needed to be told." »

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NC-17 upheld for ThinkFilm's 'Truth'

8 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Appeals Board of the MPAA's Classification and Rating Board upheld the NC-17 rating it awarded director Atom Egoyan's Where the Truth Lies at a meeting Wednesday at which it heard statements from Egoyan and actress Rachel Blanchard. The rating was given to the film, which will be released by ThinkFilm, because of what the board described as "some explicit sexuality." ThinkFilm requested the appeal after Egoyan had already made several cuts to the film, starring Kevin Bacon and Colin Firth, in hopes of receiving an R rating. At issue, according to ThinkFilm, was the mystery's pivotal scene, which involves a menage a trois between Bacon, Firth and Blanchard, which leads to a young woman's death. According to Egoyan, the shot was filmed as a single sustained master shot and he couldn't cut it any further without rendering the mystery incomprehensible. »

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NC-17 upheld for ThinkFilm's 'Truth'

7 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Appeals Board of the MPAA's Classification and Rating Board upheld the NC-17 rating it awarded director Atom Egoyan's Where the Truth Lies at a meeting Wednesday at which it heard statements from Egoyan and actress Rachel Blanchard. The rating was given to the film, which will be released by ThinkFilm, because of what the board described as "some explicit sexuality." ThinkFilm requested the appeal after Egoyan had already made several cuts to the film, starring Kevin Bacon and Colin Firth, in hopes of receiving an R rating. At issue, according to ThinkFilm, was the mystery's pivotal scene, which involves a menage a trois between Bacon, Firth and Blanchard, which leads to a young woman's death. According to Egoyan, the shot was filmed as a single sustained master shot and he couldn't cut it any further without rendering the mystery incomprehensible. »

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Zellweger's Accent Trouble

6 September 2005 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood actress Renee Zellweger got so involved in her New Jersey character for Cinderella Man, she had to re-learn her English accent when Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason required extra voice-over work. The Texan won much applause for her unfaltering British tones opposite Colin Firth and Hugh Grant - but admits she struggled to master two accents at the same time. She says, "My character in Cinderella Man comes from a very special part of New Jersey, so I was busy trying to be Mae Braddock. Then the Bridget people wanted me to record some lines. It was very confusing. But there was always my dialect coach standing there with her whip should I fail to bring that Bridget slushy thing back." »

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'Passing,' 'Shoes' kick off Woodstock

1 September 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The U.S. premiere of Winter Passing, by first-time feature director Adam Rapp and starring Zooey Deschanel, Will Ferrell and Ed Harris, will open this year's Woodstock Film Festival, along with the thriller Dead Man's Shoes, by Shane Meadows and starring Paddy Considine. The two films will simultaneously open the sixth annual festival, which runs Sept. 28-Oct. 2. This year's program, which also will see awards presented to Steve Buscemi and John Sloss, will include more than 150 films, panels, concerts and special events in Woodstock, N.Y., and in the neighboring towns of Rhinebeck, Hunter and Rosendale. The closing-night screenings include Lonesome Jim, directed by Buscemi and starring Casey Affleck and Liv Tyler, and the U.S. premiere of Atom Egoyan's Where the Truth Lies, starring Kevin Bacon and Colin Firth. »

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'Truth' hurts as ThinkFilm plans to appeal NC-17

21 August 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Call it a case of ratings interruptus. ThinkFilm said Friday that it plans to appeal the NC-17 that the MPAA Classification and Ratings Administration has awarded Atom Egoyan's Where the Truth Lies. The only problem is that, according to the MPAA, the group hasn't officially published the movie's rating yet, and no appeal date has been set. Based on a murder mystery by Rupert Holmes, Truth concerns an investigation into an unsolved murder that marred the career of a '50s stand-up comedy team (Kevin Bacon and Colin Firth). The film includes a menage a trois sex scene involving Bacon, Firth and actress Rachel Blanchard that many observers expect will result in an NC-17, which would make the movie off limits for viewers younger than 18. »

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Where the Truth Lies

13 May 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

CANNES -- Atom Egoyan has delivered a big, slick and sexy mystery in Where the Truth Lies, turning the Rupert Holmes novel into a sumptuous tale of show business hype and duplicity.

Boasting a handsome cast, top-flight design and evocative music, the film should have no trouble attracting audiences seeking high-style, grownup entertainment.

Rich in backstage atmosphere and the glamour of big-time hotels and nightclubs, the movie delves with considerable wit into the ugly side of the entertainment industry.

In the late '50s, Lanny Morris (Kevin Bacon) and Vince Collins (Colin Firth) are the biggest comedy duo in America. The last thing they need is the naked body of a beautiful blonde in the bathtub of their New Jersey hotel room.

In fact, the last thing the comedians do as partners is to deny they had anything to do with the dead woman, and they promptly break up their long-standing and hugely successful act.

Fifteen years later, a young writer named Karen O'Connor (Alison Lohman) wins a fat contract from a publisher to write a book about Vince Collins, and it is through her eyes that the secret behind their split is slowly revealed.

Using flashbacks from different points of view, Egoyan traces the lies and deception that have kept the sordid events that followed a Miami telethon from a still-adoring public.

Larry and Vince had been forced by a no-nonsense gangster named Sally Sanmarco (David Hayman) to fly directly from the Miami gig to the opening of his New Jersey nightclub, where the corpse was found.

As O'Connor discovers, many facts were quickly hidden and the comics appear to have covered their tracks cleverly but with their careers pretty much over by the '70s, their mutual desire for public acclaim drives them to reveal a version of the truth.

But the young writer cannot resist being drawn into the pair's intense world of fabrication and celebrity worship. "Having to be a nice guy is the hardest job in the world when you're not," Larry tells her.

Egoyan has enormous fun peeling the wrappers of showbiz lore so that we see the hoodlums, the drug taking, kinky sex and unstoppable violence. Soon O'Connor is wrapped up in it as much as the superstars who might or might not have committed murder.

The film obeys the sometimes strained logic of mystery novels so that there's more than the occasional need to suspend disbelief, but Egoyan's script moves slickly along to a satisfying conclusion.

Bacon is as taut and effective as usual, and Firth might prove a revelation to those who have seen him only in period pictures and English comedies. Lohman carries the weight of lead investigator with immense charm and no little grit.

Best of all, the film looks wonderful, and full credit is due to production designer Phillip Barker and costume designer Beth Pasternak. Mychael Danna's music, too, is sly and seductive, adding a touch of noir class to the proceedings.

WHERE THE TRUTH LIES

Serendipity Point Films, First Choice Films

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Atom Egoyan

Producer: Robert Lantos

Co-producers: Sandra Cunningham, Chris Chrisafis

Based on the novel by: Rupert Holmes

Cinematographer: Paul Sarossy

Editor: Susan Shipton

Production designer: Phillip Barker

Music: Mychael Danna

Costume designer: Beth Pasternak

Cast:

Lanny Morris: Kevin Bacon

Vince Collins: Colin Firth

Karen O'Connor: Alison Lohman

Maureen: Rachel Blanchard

Reuben: David Hayman

Sally Sanmarco: David Hayman

Alice: Kristin Adams

Bonnie: Sonja Bennett

Mrs. O'Flaherty: Deborah Grover

Jack Scaglia: Beau Starr

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 107 minutes »

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Fever Pitch

7 May 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With an all-star lineup that includes directors Peter and Bobby Farrelly, screenwriters Lowell Ganz & Babaloo Mandel and trusty Drew Barrymore, you'd think they'd have no problem hitting one out of the megaplex ballpark.

But while Fever Pitch, an all-American take on the Nick Hornby novel and 1997 Colin Firth film about a soccer-obsessed British schoolteacher who finally must choose between his girlfriend and his beloved team, ultimately goes the distance, it gets the job done with a halfhearted bunt rather than a solid line drive.

A good part of the problem has to do with the fact that Drew and co-star Jimmy Fallon just don't have that easy chemistry of an Adam Sandler matchup, but the film's bigger hurdle has to do with overcoming bulky romantic comedy plot and character mechanics that keep tripping up the momentum.

While Barrymore's proven track record with the genre should ensure solid opening weekend attendance, Fallon, with only Taxi to his post-"SNL" credit, has yet to establish big-screen credibility.

The final take likely will fall considerably short of those Sandler-Barrymore movies, but just like the Bosox's momentous 2004 World Series victory, miracles can happen.

A career Red Sox fan, Fallon's Ben Wrightman knows from the agony of defeat, even though each year's arrival of spring training brings a fresh glimmer of hope.

But the schoolteacher whose apartment looks more like a Beantown sports bar, complete with Red Sox bedding and a catcher's mitt telephone, will have to put his loyalties to the test with the arrival of Lindsey Meeks (Barrymore), a workaholic business consultant who takes a shine to Ben during the off-season but isn't prepared to sleep with the team come April.

At some point Wrightman will have to make a decision that could cost him the season's tickets left to him by his late Uncle Carl (Lenny Clarke).

Having penned some of the most successful comedies of the past two decades, the team of Ganz & Mandel (Splash, Parenthood, A League of Their Own) know from the big laughs, but in turning the Hornby material into an old-fashioned Hollywood romantic comedy, some much-needed edge has been lost in translation.

A great deal of the script, the performances and the Farrelly brothers' kinder, gentler directing style leave a generic, heavily manufactured aftertaste. Unlike the musically obsessed characters in Hornby's High Fidelity, Ben's fierce fanaticism feels about as authentic as Astroturf.

Barrymore's character, meanwhile, hasn't been fleshed out enough to suggest exactly why she's so willing to compete with Fallon's true love in the first place.

In the end, the film still manages to take the audience-pleasing pennant, but given all the proven talent that went into it, Fever Pitch never manages to break a convincing sweat.

FEVER PITCH

20th Century Fox

Fox 2000 Pictures presents a Gil Netter/Flower Films/Wildgaze Films/Alan Greenspan production

Credits:

Directors: Peter Farrelly & Bobby Farrelly

Screenwriters: Lowell Ganz & Babaloo Mandel

Based on the book by: Nick Hornby

Producers: Alan Greenspan, Amanda Posey, Gil Netter, Drew Barrymore, Nancy Juvonen, Bradley Thomas

Executive producers: Nick Hornby, David Evans, Marc S. Fischer

Director of photography: Matthew F. Leonetti

Production designer: Maher Ahmad

Editor: Alan Baumgarten

Costume designer: Sophie de Rakoff

Music: Craig Armstrong

Cast:

Lindsey Meeks: Drew Barrymore

Ben Wrightman: Jimmy Fallon

Uncle Carl: Lenny Clarke

Molly: Ione Skye

Sarah: Marissa Jaret Winokur

Doug Meeks: James B. Sikking

Maureen Meeks: Jobeth Williams

MPAA rating: PG-13

Running time: 101 minutes.

»

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DEJ responds to Evans' 'Trauma'

25 February 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

DEJ Prods. has acquired North America rights in all media to the psychological thriller Trauma. The first film from Little Bird's genre label Ministry of Fear, Trauma was directed by Marc Evans from an original script from Richard Smith and centers on Ben (Colin Firth), who awakes from a coma to discover his wife has been killed but then learns she might be alive. It was produced by Jonathan Cavendish and Nicky Kentish Barnes. The deal was negotiated by Myriad Pictures president Kirk D'Amico, who exec produced with Stephen Break of DEJ Prods. »

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Pair of movies going Beyond

15 February 2005 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

BERLIN -- Australia's Beyond Films snapped up a brace of titles during the weekend, taking on sales duties to No One Gets Off in This Town, from director Richard Kwietniowski (Owning Mahowny), and Gillies MacKinnon's Flesh and Blood. Gets Off has lined up a cast including Brenda Blethyn, Jane Horrocks, John Hurt, Amira Casar and Rupert Evans, Beyond said. It will be produced by Jason Newmark, through U.K. production banner Dan Films. MacKinnon will direct Gary Lewis in the lead role of Flesh and Blood, which will be executive produced by Sally Hibbin and produced by Jane Robertson. Beyond also announced that Marc Evans has been tapped to direct its South African war story The Dead Wait, which headlines Colin Firth and is being produced by Sheryl Crown. »

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'Vera Drake' Steals British Film Award Ceremony

8 February 2005 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Vera Drake director Mike Leigh and actress Imelda Staunton were the big winners at Sunday night's 2004 Evening Standard British Film Awards in London. The gritty drama about a 1950s illegal abortionist was named Best Film and Staunton - who is also nominated at this year's Academy Awards Ceremony - was honored as Best Actress. Paddy Considine was named Best Actor for his performance in Dead Man's Shoes; Shaun Of The Dead star Simon Pegg picked up the Peter Sellers Award for Comedy; and Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason was voted Evening Standard Readers' Film of 2004 at the British capital's Savoy Hotel. The Alexander Walker Special Award, which honors lasting contributions to the British film industry, was presented to Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner - the co-chairmen of Working Title films. The production company has produced a string of successes including My Beautiful Laundrette, Billy Elliot and About a Boy. Nathalie Press and Emily Blunt shared the Best Newcomer award for their performances in My Summer Of Love, and director Pawel Pawlikowski took the Best Screenplay crown. Roger Deakins won the technical achievement award for his cinematography on The Ladykillers and The Village at the ceremony attending by Dame Judi Dench, Kim Cattrall, Charles Dance, Bill Nighy and Colin Firth. »

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15 items from 2005


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