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What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017

24 March 2017 2:02 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mira Nair and Ava DuVernay: Wikimedia Commons/IndiaFM/Bollywoodhungama/usbotschaftberlin

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

Female filmmakers greeted the 21st century with optimism. By most measures, movies by women were garnering increased respect in the industry and at the multiplex. Their makers cracked glass ceilings, created new genres, and established new box-office records.

With “Nowhere in Africa” (2001), Caroline Link became the second woman to direct the Oscar-winner for the year’s best foreign film. With “Lost in Translation” (2003), Sofia Coppola was the third woman to receive a best director nomination from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. And with “The Hurt Locker” (2009), Kathryn Bigelow was the fourth woman nominated in the directing category — and the first to win. The following year, Danish filmmaker Susanna Bier directed the winner in the best foreign film category, “In a Better World.”

Gina Prince-Bythewood’s “Love & Basketball” (2000), Karyn Kusama’s “Girlfight” (2000) and Gurinder Chadha’s “Bend It Like Beckham” (2003) created what might be called the “Title IX” movie, celebrating female athletes on the court, in the ring, and on the field. These are sports movies that celebrate the female body — not for its sex appeal, but for its power. These films inspired younger women (and their mothers were thrilled to take them to movies that didn’t objectify women).

Comedies by women continued to make serious box office, proving the Hollywood wisdom that “funny is money.” Nancy Meyers’ “What Women Want” (2000), starring Mel Gibson as a player briefly given the power to hear what women think about him, made $374 million. Sharon Maguire’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001), in which the title character says what she thinks about womanizers and prigs, brought in $282 million. Movies like these permitted men and women to laugh at men’s foibles.

From Patricia Cardoso’s “Real Women Have Curves” (2002), which introduced America Ferrera as a college-bound Latina, to Julie Taymor’s biopic “Frida” (2003), with Salma Hayek as Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, to Patty Jenkins’ “Monster” (2003), with Charlize Theron as serial killer Aileen Wuornos, audiences saw realistic women — as opposed to human swizzle sticks with breasts — in movies by women.

Many critics hailed Niki Caro’s “Whale Rider” (2003), about a Maori preteen who challenges her tribal patriarchy and becomes the new chief, as a harbinger of the triumph of female filmmakers over the status quo. Others pointed to the fact that for the first time since records had been kept, in 2000 women made 11 percent of the top 250 box office films. For women who make movies, the new century felt like a new day.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Sadly, that encouraging percentage turned out to be a fluke. After 2000, the number dwindled. It remains stuck in the 6 to 9 percent range, says Martha Lauzen, professor of communications and head of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University. Since 1998 Lauzen has tracked women working in the industry in her annual “Celluloid Ceiling” report.

“When I started this, I thought it was merely an issue of people not knowing how low the numbers were,” Lauzen said ruefully. “I didn’t know how slow social change is.”

Lauzen’s reporting represents one of three vital resources for understanding the triumphs female filmmakers have made and how far they need to go to achieve parity with men. The others are Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity and Social Change Institute at USC’s Annenberg School and The Bunche Center at UCLA.

Collectively and individually, these creators of annual good news/bad news reports have kept the issue of representation in the public eye.

The Good: For Kathryn Bigelow (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”), the late Nora Ephron (“Julie & Julia”), and Nancy Meyers (“It’s Complicated,” “The Intern”), the 21st century has been a fruitful time. So, too, for younger female moviemakers. Consider Lisa Cholodenko (“Laurel Canyon,” “The Kids Are All Right”), Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “13th”), and Mira Nair (“Monsoon Wedding,” “The Namesake”).

Consider also that Catherine Hardwicke established a franchise with “Twilight” (which made $393 million), Sam Taylor-Johnson created another with “50 Shades of Grey” ($571 million), and that Anne Fletcher’s “The Proposal” made $317 million and Phyllida Lloyd’s “Mamma Mia!” earned $609 million.

Additionally, filmmakers like Dee Rees (“Pariah”), Debra Granik (“Winter’s Bone”), and Lone Scherfig (“An Education”) broke into the market with unique visions and eyes for new talent, including Adepero Oduye, Jennifer Lawrence, and Carey Mulligan. Significantly, Vicky Jenson (“Shrek”), Jennifer Lee (“Frozen”), Jennifer Yuh Nelson (“Kung Fu Panda 2”), and Brenda Chapman (“Brave”) staked a place for women in animation.

The Bad: For every woman appearing onscreen in movies in 2015 there were 2.3 men, according to Stacy Smith’s Media Diversity & Social Change Initiative.

The Ugly: When Walt Hickey, culture reporter for the website fivethirtyeight.com, goes to the movies and sees the screen population is 69 percent male, it just looks wrong to him. “It’s like something apocalyptic has happened, like a parallel universe — a man’s world,” he says.

Both Lauzen’s and Smith’s data show that when a woman is behind the camera and/or screenplay, 39 percent of protagonists are female. In movies by male directors, only four percent of the lead characters are female.

A century ago, male dominance behind the camera and on the screen was not the norm. For women behind the camera, it’s been the norm since 1920. And for women onscreen, it’s been the norm since 1950. Because of this, moviegoers have a distorted picture of America as predominantly male and predominantly Caucasian, when it is neither. (For finer-grain data on minority representation, see this annual report from UCLA’s Bunche Center.)

The Force Reawakens

The Hollywood Dream Factory tailors the majority of its product to the measurements of the men in the audience. This troubles those who want their daughters to partake of the same professional opportunities, cultural representation, and dream lives as their sons. While “Nine to Five,” “Norma Rae,” and “Erin Brockovich” show that studios love stories of women who triumph over the odds, there is less obvious love for female filmmakers trying to beat the odds stacked against them in their professional lives.

Since the Original Six filed suit against two studios in 1983 (see Part 3), female filmmakers have met, strategized, and troubleshot. So much so that in one of her final essays before her death in 2012, Nora Ephron made a list of “Things I Won’t Miss.” Near the top: “Panels on Women in Film.” Many women in film felt as though they were running in place.

“Instead of holding a million panels about it,” Christine Vachon, producer of “Boys Don’t Cry” and “Carol,” exclaimed at the 2016 Sundance Festival, “let’s do something about it!”

Someone had. She is Maria Giese, director of the feature films “When Saturday Comes” and “Hunger.” In February 2013 she brought a complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Eeoc) in Los Angeles. Her contention was that the cohort of working filmmakers in the Directors Guild of America (DGA), of which she is a member, was overwhelmingly male.

(While the number of women in the guild directing episodic television amounts to 17 percent, the DGA 2015 census of female filmmakers registered 6.4 percent. That’s lower than the nine percent of female coal miners, and fractional next to the 32 percent of practicing physicians and 36 percent of practicing lawyers who are women).

The Eeoc, which collects data on employer/employee relations for each calendar year, was reluctant to take on a class-action suit.

In April 2013, Giese contacted the Aclu of Southern California and showed the evidence to Melissa Goodman, director of its Lgbtq, Gender & Reproductive Justice Project. For the next two years Goodman and her colleague Ariela Migdal took testimony from more than 50 female directors. In May 2015 they sent the Eeoc an extraordinary letter that counted the ways in which “female filmmakers are effectively excluded from directing big-budget films and seriously underrepresented in television.” A compelling argument in their letter: “The entertainment industry employs many people and makes products that profoundly shape our culture and the perception of women and girls.” Later in 2015, the Eeoc commenced its own investigation.

In January 2017, based on a high-level internal DGA leak received by Giese, Deadline Hollywood reported that after a federal investigation spanning a year that included testimony from over 100 women directors, the Eeoc recently served charges of sex discrimination and unfair hiring practice against all six major studios. While the federal agency does not comment on active cases, Gillian Thomas and Melissa Goodman of the Aclu wrote in an editorial that they had no reason to doubt the veracity of the leak.

A key factor contributing to Giese’s success in getting this issue to the Aclu and Eeoc was her ability to expose the structural obstacles female filmmakers face, from a guild that puts female and minority filmmakers in the same category, to the studios that question the fitness of women to direct.

Myths and Continued Underrepresentation

Over the 25 years I’ve reported on female filmmakers, I’ve interviewed two generations of movie executives. Most, but not all, were male. Most took seriously my questions about the apparent exclusion of women behind the camera, both on the screen and their forthcoming line-up.

Without exception, all of them retold one or more of the “Three Hollywood Myths.”

Myth #1) “Women don’t want to direct action movies and those are the films which are making money.”

Untrue. See: Martha Coolidge’s “Real Genius” (1985), Kathryn Bigelow’s “Point Break” (1991), Mimi Leder’s “The Peacemaker” (1997) and “Deep Impact” (1998), Lexi Alexander’s “Punisher: War Zone” (2008), and Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker” (2009) and “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012).

What is true is that Patty Jenkins was hired to direct “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) and left due to creative differences. She is now working on the forthcoming “Wonder Woman.”

What is true is that Mira Nair was offered a “Harry Potter” film and chose instead to make the family drama “The Namesake” because the material was more important to her, and that Ava DuVernay was offered “Black Panther,” the film version of the Marvel Comics series, and declined for similar reasons.

Myth #2) “Movies by women don’t make money.”

Untrue again. Some movies by women don’t make back their investment, just as some movies by men do not. What is true is that many movies by women make major bank. Catherine Hardwicke’s little $37 million film “Twilight” grossed $393 million and launched a billion-dollar franchise.

Hardwicke told me by phone that she hears all the time from studios that films by women are poor investments. “And every time you say, ‘Well, this one made money, that one made money,’ they say, ‘This one made money because it was based on a best-selling book,’ or ‘That one made money because of its hot actress.’”

Here are six more films by women and their box-office grosses. They made money because they powerfully connected with audiences.

Bend it Like Beckham” (Gurinder Chadha). Cost: $6 million/Gross: $77 million“Frida” (Julie Taymor). Cost: $12 million/Gross: $56 million“Frozen” (Jennifer Lee). Cost: $150 million/Gross: $1.2 billion“The Proposal” (Anne Fletcher). Cost: $40 million/Gross: $317 million“Selma” (Ava DuVernay). Cost: $20 million/Gross $67 million“Lost in Translation” (Sofia Coppola). Cost: $4 million/Gross $120 million

Myth #3) “A woman behind the camera means women on the screen and no men in the audience.”

Untrue, if taken literally. Sometimes movies by women have a lower percentage of men in the audience, just as sometimes movies by men have a lower percentage of women in the audience. Take, for example, the 2015 films, “Bridge of Spies” by Steven Spielberg and “The Intern” by Nancy Meyers.

According to Paul Dergarabedian of comScore, the research company’s “PostTrak” data shows the audience gender breakdown at “Bridge of Spies,” a ’60s-era political thriller starring Tom Hanks, was 54 percent male and 46 percent female. For “The Intern,” a contemporary workplace comedy co-starring Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro, it was 41 percent male and 59 percent female. Spielberg’s film grossed $165 million; Meyers’ $194 million. His budget was $40 million; hers was $35 million.

Ava DuVernay’s “Selma,” the story of the 1965 march for voting rights led by Martin Luther King and starring David Oyelowo, had an audience gender breakdown of 47 percent male and 53 percent female. The assumption that movies come gendered with a blue or pink ribbon is a canard that still lingers in Hollywood, perhaps a vestige of the target marketing that began in the 1980s.

Speaking from the set of “Queen Sugar” in 2016, DuVernay observed, “We’re in a place right now where every other film is about a comic book superhero. We’re top-heavy with testosterone.”

How did Hollywood, a century ago a place where female directors thrived and prospered, come to this?

Stacy Title, director of “The Last Supper” and “The Bye Bye Man,” points the finger at “unconscious bias.”

Mira Nair, who was born in India, suspects chauvinism. “I’ve always remarked at the irony that the percentage of female directors is higher in India than in the United States,” she explained in a phone conversation. “India is supposed to be the traditional chauvinist culture,” she observes. Nair wonders if the historic examples of female prime ministers in South Asia — Indira Gandhi in India, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan — may have broken the glass ceiling for all professional women there. “Their examples don’t exist in the U.S.”

DuVernay looks forward to the outcome — and hoped-for positive resolution — of the Eeoc investigation. “It’s a systematic problem and it requires radical change,” she said. “If it’s not happening organically, systems should be put in place.” Like many female filmmakers, DuVernay hopes the Eeoc can reconfigure what Giese calls the “vertical playing field for women” into a level one.

“One thing I’m heartened by,” said Nair, who’s been making features for nearly 30 years, “is that the variety and confidence of female filmmakers today is inspiring.”

Do others think it’s changed for the better for women since the 1980s?

“For me, there’s no comparison between the ’80s and now,” reflected Nancy Meyers, whose six films as a director or writer/director have grossed more than a billion dollars. By email she wrote:

Men were still getting used to us being on set in the ’80s. (Men used to have photos of pinups on the set in the ’80s! I’m not kidding.)The only women around back then worked in costumes and hair and makeup. Today women are in every department and often department heads. There are still very few women in the camera department and that’s a shame. That seems to still be a real boy’s club. Today, most crew members are far more comfortable working for and with women.

Yet one thing has not changed: “Now, getting the job to be the director — that’s still an uphill battle,” Meyers said.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 5: 2000–2017 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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Exclusive: Erika Jayne to Headline Hyundai’s 28th Annual GLAAD Media Awards After Party

24 March 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Erika Jayne is taking a night off from rehearsing for Dancing With the Stars to help celebrate the Lgbtq community as the headliner for the 28th Annual GLAAD Media Awards after party on April 1.

The gala bash, presented by Hyundai, will be held at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California. The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star and best-selling dance music artist is set to perform a number of her hits.

More: 'Moonlight,' 'Transparent' and 'I Am Cait' Among GLAAD Media Award Nominees

On Monday, Jayne made her DWTS debut alongside pro dancer Gleb Savchenko, where the pair danced a salsa to her own popular dance track, "XXpen$ive," which she will also be performing at the after party.

Jayne is among several big name stars who will be appearing at this year's Awards ceremony, including The Hunger Games' Josh Hutcherson, Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany, and Victoria Justice.

Comedian [link=nm »

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Awards Roundup: CinemaCon to Fete Naomi Watts, Pflag National to Honor Martha Plimpton and More

24 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our weekly Awards Roundup column.

– Pflag National — the nation’s largest organization for families, friends, and allies of people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (Lgbt) — will celebrate The Ninth Annual Straight for Equality Awards, celebrating high-profile allies who are moving equality forward for the Lgbt community, and transforming the way that Lgbtq people are understood and treated by using their talents in their respective fields to empower others to also become engaged on the issues.

This year, the event will celebrate Tony and Emmy Award-winning actress Martha Plimpton, CNN political analyst Ana Navarro, and Alcoa. Attendees will also enjoy a performance from the Tony Award-winning Best Musical “Kinky Boots.” The evening will be hosted by comedian Fortune Feimster.

– Two-time Academy Award nominee Naomi Watts will receive the CinemaCon Distinguished Decade of Achievement in Film Award, it was announced by CinemaCon Managing Director, »

- Kate Erbland

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All Nighter Review

23 March 2017 10:05 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Gavin Wiesen’s All Nighter is essentially a lo-fi indie take on Meet the Parents. In the Ben Stiller role is Emile Hirsch as Martin, a bearded, banjo playing La layabout whose shirts go perpetually un-ironed. Filling Robert De Niro’s shoes is J.K. Simmons as his girlfriend Ginnie’s (Analeigh Tipton) father, Mr. Gallo, a smartly suited alpha male whose job is carrying out suspiciously sinister sounding “procurement.”

First impressions are disastrous, with Mr. Gallo blankly dismissing the wimpy, awkward creature his daughter has attached herself to. Ginnie seems to come to her senses, too, as she breaks up with Martin soon after. This all makes it something of a surprise when, six months later, Mr. Gallo unexpectedly turns up at Martin’s front door.

Ginnie isn’t returning her father’s calls and so, fearing the worst, her father has returned to La to search for her, enlisting »

- David James

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Patricia Arquette To Be Honored at 28th Annual GLAAD Media Awards in Los Angeles

23 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Patricia Arquette will be honored at the 28th Annual GLAAD Media Awards next month.

The 48-year-old actress will receive the organization's Vanguard Award for her work as a longtime ally and supporter of the Lgbtq community at the Los Angeles awards ceremony at the Beverly Hilton on April 1.

Related: 'Moonlight,' 'Transparent' and 'I Am Cait' Among GLAAD Media Award Nominees -- See the Full List

"Patricia Arquette embodies the critical voice needed during these times to resist against injustice and discrimination across a range of issues," GLAAD President & CEO Sarah Kate Ellis said in a press release. "She is a beacon of light who has consistently used her platform to advance equality across marginalized groups and to drive culture-changing conversations that move acceptance forward."

Arquette will also honor her late sister, Alexis Arquette, at the event, remembering the transgender actress' contributions to both film and the Lgbtq community.

Cameron Esposito is set to host the event »

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The Comedian Starring Robert De Niro and an All-Star Cast Debuts on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital May 2nd

22 March 2017 6:26 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Two-Time Academy Award Winner Robert De Niro Leads an All-Star Cast, Including Leslie Mann, Danny DeVito, Edie Falco, Charles Grodin, Cloris Leachman, Patti LuPone and Harvey Keitel in The Comedian

Two-time Academy Award winner Robert De Niro (Best Supporting Actor, The Godfather: Part II, 1974; Best Actor, Raging Bull, 1980) stars as an aging insult comic trying to reinvent himself for acclaimed filmmaker Taylor Hackford (Ray) in the comedy-drama The Comedian. De Niro’s eight-years-in-the-making passion project also stars Leslie Mann (Knocked Up), Danny DeVito (“Always Sunny in Philadelphia”), Edie Falco (“The Sopranos”), Charles Grodin (Dave), Academy Award winner Cloris Leachman (Best Supporting Actress, The Last Picture Show, 1971), Patti LuPone (“Penny Dreadful”), and Academy Award nominee Harvey Keitel (Best Supporting Actor, Bugsy, 1991), with a cast that includes Lucy DeVito (Leaves of Grass) and Billy Crystal (When Harry Met Sally…). In addition, the film features a veritable who’s who of stand-up comedians, »

- Tom Stockman

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"The Godfather" And "Godfather Part II" Reunion At Radio City Music Hall, April 29

21 March 2017 9:41 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Director Francis Ford Coppola will be joined on stage by major cast members from "The Godfather" and "The Godfather Part II" as part of the Tribeca Film Festival's closing ceremonies. The event will take place at Radio City Music Hall on Saturday, April 29 following screenings of both films. Among those expected to appear: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Diane Keaton, Robert Duvall,Talia Shire and James Caan. Tickets went on sale this morning. Click here to order.  »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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'Feud': How Ryan Murphy's Hollywood-Diva Miniseries Rips Celebrity Apart

21 March 2017 7:55 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Fame – it's a hell of a drug. Feud is like watching Robert De Niro and Al Pacino square off in Heat, except with two of Hollywood's living legends playing a couple of dead ones. In Ryan Murphy's new anthology series, Jessica Lange is Joan Crawford to Susan Sarandon's Bette Davis, a pair of toxic movie divas madly in hate with each other. As Davis famously snipped, "She has slept with every male star at MGM, except Lassie." This eight-episode fever dream celebrates how they basically invented the modern celebrity beef, »

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Colin Farrell & Yorgos Lanthimos re-team for Amazon series

21 March 2017 1:45 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Amazon look set to once more throw down the gauntlet to its main rival Netflix with its latest project. The studio has reportedly managed to bag Lobster director Yorgos Lanthimos, and his lead, Colin Farrell, for a new project. This follows not long after the announcement that they are developing a David O. Russell drama starring Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore. The new project will focus on Oliver North and his involvement in the Iran-Contra affair.

The production is still in very early stages, with the script still being written by Enzo Mileti and Scott WilsonBen Stiller and Nicky Weinstock are on-board as executive producers. Lanthimos had this to say about the forthcoming project:

“I’m really excited to be working with Colin again on something quite different to what we have done so far. I look forward to joining forces with Ben and Nicky, who had an »

- Kat Hughes

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TVLine Items: Shut Eye Renewed, Killing Vet Joins 9/11 Drama and More

20 March 2017 3:19 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Shut Eye will remain open at Hulu, although the drama is setting its sights on a new boss.

The streamer has renewed the Jeffrey Donovan-KaDee Strickland drama for a second 10-episode season amid word that showrunner David Hudgins has exited the series. According to The Hollywood Reporter, John Shiban (Hell on Wheels) has been brought in to replace him.

Ready for more of today’s newsy nuggets? Well…

Peter Sarsgaard is set to star alongside Jeff Daniels in Hulu’s upcoming 9/11 drama The Looming Tower. The Killing alum will play Martin Schmidt, a CIA analyst who believes he »

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Colin Farrell to Star as Oliver North in Iran-Contra Series for Amazon (Exclusive)

20 March 2017 2:43 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Colin Farrell is ready to return to the small screen.

Farrell and his “Lobster” director Yorgos Lanthimos are teaming up again on an Amazon show about Oliver North and his involvement in the Iran-Contra affair. Farrell will star as the former U.S. marine in the untitled limited series, which will primarily focus on the Iran-Contra scandal, and Lanthimos will direct.

According to sources, the project is still in development as Amazon awaits scripts from Enzo Mileti and Scott WilsonBen Stiller and Nicky Weinstock are exec producing for Red Hour Films.

“I’m really excited to be working with Colin again on something quite different to what we have done so far,” Lanthimos said. “I look forward to joining forces with Ben and Nicky, who had an excellent casting idea and saw the potential of the material early on and Amazon, who has embraced the project with great enthusiasm. It »

- Justin Kroll

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Tribeca Talks 2017: Scarlett Johansson, Kathryn Bigelow, Noah Baumbach, and Lena Dunham Join The Conversation

20 March 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Tribeca Film Festival announced today its full slate of panels and discussions with industry leaders for the 16th annual festival.

Under the Tribeca Talks banner, the festival presents a talent-filled roster in discussion with leading creative voices across the entertainment industry. That includes conversations with big name directors such as Kathryn Bigelow, Noah Baumbach, Lena Dunham, and Jon Favreau, as well as crossovers from the music and sports industries like Common, Kobe Bryant, and Bruce Springsteen. They will be joining previously announced participants Alejandro González Iñárritu and Barbra Streisand.

Read More: Tribeca 2017 Lineup: New Films From Alex Gibney, Azazel Jacobs and Laurie Simmons Lead the Eclectic Mix

Scarlett Johansson will interview Jon Favreau as part of the Directors Series, and Dustin Hoffman will do the same with Noah Baumbach. The Storytellers Series will feature “Girls” creator Lena Dunham in conversation with longtime collaborator Jenni Konner, as well as a »

- Jude Dry

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Tom Hanks to Interview Bruce Springsteen for Tribeca Fest Talks

20 March 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Bruce Springsteen will discuss his position in American rock history during an intimate conversation with Tom Hanks for the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival. The event, set for Friday, April 28th at the Beacon Theater, is one of several newly announced "Tribeca Talks" scheduled throughout the festival. 

Scarlett Johansson, Kobe Bryant, Lena Dunham, Barbra Streisand (interviewed by director Robert Rodriguez), Dustin Hoffman, Noah Baumbach, Common, filmmaker Alejandro González Iñárritu (Birdman, The Revenant) and  will also participate in panels and discussions at the festival, which runs April 19th through the 30th.

The Springsteen »

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Aarp Studios Launches With First Project Starring Don Rickles

20 March 2017 7:02 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Aarp today announced the launch of in-house production entity Aarp Studios and set its first project, Dinner With Don, starring Don Rickles. The 10-episode Dinner With Don will featuring Rickles dining with friends and fellow comedians at some of his favorite La-area restaurants, with a guest list that includes Billy Crystal, Robert De Niro, Jimmy Kimmel, Amy Poehler, Vince Vaughn, Paul Rudd, Marisa Tomei and Martin Scorsese. The series also will feature archives and… »

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Aarp Studios Launches With Don Rickles Interview Show

20 March 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Don Rickles and the Aarp are joining forces.

The nonprofit geared toward Americans over 50 is launching Aarp Studios with its inaugural project being an unscripted series headlined by the 90-year-old comic titled Dinner With Don.

Dinner With Don will see Rickles eating and dining with friends and fellow comedians while also featuring archives of Rickles' and his guests' work whenever possible. Upcoming guests for season one include Billy Crystal, Robert De Niro, Jimmy Kimmel, Amy Poehler, Vince Vaughn, Paul Rudd, Marisa Tomei and Martin Scorsese. The series will be shot around Los Angeles at famed restaurants including Craig's, The »

- Brian Porreca

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New trailer for The Wizard of Lies starring Robert De Niro as Bernie Madoff

20 March 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

HBO has released a new teaser trailer for Barry Levinson’s upcoming drama The Wizard of Lies. Based on Diana B. Henriques’  The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust, the film sees Robert De Niro lead the cast the American stockbroker and financier Bernie Madoff; take a look below after the official synopsis…

In 2008, stockbroker, investment advisor and financier Bernie Madoff made headlines around the world when he was arrested for perpetrating perhaps the largest financial fraud in U.S. history.

Debuting in May, HBO FilmsThe Wizard Of Lies examines Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme – his deception, lies and cover-up, all as the financier’s wife and sons are catapulted into a harsh and unrelenting spotlight.

Robert De Niro (Oscar® winner for “Raging Bull” and “The Godfather II”) comes to HBO for the first time in the role of family patriarch Bernie Madoff. Also »

- Amie Cranswick

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Awards Roundup: CinemaCon to Honor Goldie Hawn, John Cena, Ansel Elgort and More

17 March 2017 7:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our weekly Awards Roundup column.

– Academy Award winner Goldie Hawn will receive the prestigious “Cinema Icon Award” at CinemaCon, the official convention of The National Association of Theatre Owners (Nato) held March 27 – 30 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

Hawn will be presented with this special honor at the “CinemaCon Big Screen Achievement Awards” ceremony Thursday, March 30 hosted by the Coca-Cola Company, the official presenting sponsor of CinemaCon. Previous winners of this esteemed award include Morgan Freeman, Susan Sarandon, Michelle Pfeiffer and Kevin Costner.  

“With a career that has spanned roles in more than 30 films Goldie Hawn continues to shine on the big screen as one of the most entertaining, relatable and recognizable actresses of our time,” noted Neuhauser. “With an unforgettable presence and charm both onscreen and off Hawn has entertained audiences of all ages and we are pleased to honor an »

- Kate Erbland

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Beyond the music by Anne-Katrin Titze

17 March 2017 6:18 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Reda Kateb enjoys playing Django Reinhardt for director Étienne Comar Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At the Rendez-Vous with French Cinema lunch, hosted by uniFrance, Reda Kateb gave me the connection between David Oelhoffen's Loin Des Hommes with Viggo Mortensen at the Venice Film Festival and meeting longtime Nick Cave collaborator Warren Ellis there, which led to composing for Reda's film Pitchoune and to Warren creating a requiem for Étienne Comar's Django.

Over really good coffee and delicious gelato at Robert De Niro's Locanda Verde in Tribeca, Reda told me about discovering Bimbam Merstein with casting director Stéphane Batut, insights with Cécile de France, spending one year in preparation, and Django Reinhardt's monkey Joko in the film.

On Django Reinhardt (Reda Kateb): "I didn't have an idea of him but I wanted to be him."

Django, based on the novel by Alexis Salatko, chronicles a crucial time »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Hollywood and Las Vegas: The Perfect Movie Relationship

16 March 2017 6:39 PM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

There’s not many places on Earth more bright, glitzy and glamorous than Las Vegas. With its famous shows, many casinos and constant parties, it’s no surprise that the city in the desert is popular with Hollywood and the film industry. Situated just 263 miles east of Los Angeles and the film community, Vegas has attracted the attention of movie producers for decades.

Founded in 1905, not too long after the birth of the movie industry itself, the City Of Las Vegas first appeared in a motion picture in 1952. The film was The Las Vegas Story, a Howard Hughes production starring Jane Russell and Victor Mature that was a suspenseful thriller involving murder and intrigue. It was quickly followed by the likes of Crashing Las Vegas and Meet Me In Las Vegas a few years later, but it was the arrival of the 1960 Rat Pack film Ocean’s 11 which really united »

- David Agnew

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Alec Baldwin to Be Honored, Roasted on Spike TV’s ‘One Night Only’ Special

14 March 2017 2:36 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Spike TV’s next honoree for their “One Night Only” series is none other than Alec Baldwin. The special, airing on July 9 at 9/8c, will bring together the actor’s closest friends and costars for a night of comedic tributes and celebration.

The exclusive black tie evening,”Part ‘This Is Your Life,’ part Dean Martin Roast,” features comedy, film packages, music, candid (and humorous) personal stories, and several surprises. Friends and icons from the comedy, film, and TV worlds will gather for the taping on June 25 at Harlem’s Apollo Theater.

“Alec is an original and one of the greats. Heroic, complicated, legendary, brilliant, and hilarious,” said Casey Patterson, executive producer of the special. “When we spoke about this event he said ‘you overestimate the number of friends I have’ and I replied ‘you underestimate the number of people that will line up to have fun at your expense.’ It will be that kind of night: love »

- Dani Levy

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