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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 1970

1-20 of 335 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


17 Key Cinematic Influences On Stranger Things

21 July 2016 11:20 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Credit where credit’s due for Matt and Ross Duffer: together, they’ve created one of the most purely entertaining shows of the year so far, despite having no major credits to their name before now (save for some shorts and a few episodes of Wayward Pines). Now, with Stranger Things, the brothers are set to become Hollywood big shots – already, their supernatural Netflix original is proving a runaway success with both critics and audiences.

It can’t be denied, however, that the brothers had help. It’ll be obvious to anyone who’s been tuned in to pop culture from the past 40 years that Stranger Things is the sum of its influences. This series certainly doesn’t exist in a bubble: rather, it’s a show propped up by ideas from other hit movies and stories drawn from the works of popular filmmakers.

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Again, »

- Brogan Morris

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'Stranger Things': How Netflix's Retro Hit Resurrects the Eighties

21 July 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

It's one thing to set a TV series in the 1980s; it's a whole other thing, however, to make it feel like it was actually shot during the Reagan-and-Rubik's-Cube era. Matt and Ross Duffer's new Netflix series Stranger Things is full of nostalgic nods to the decade and its pop-cultural products, but it's also uncommonly rigorous about getting the details just right — whether it's the many pitch-perfect music cues, the hat-tipping nods and homages to Eighties movies, or simply nailing the cringeworthy fashion statements of the day (those Mom jeans! »

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Comic-Con 2016: Photos of Sideshow’s Big Trouble In Little China Jack Burton Figure

21 July 2016 12:09 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

You better believe that Sideshow Collectibles’ check is in the mail, pal, because their new sixth scale figure of ol’ Jack Burton was unveiled on the show floor at Comic-Con, and we have photos of the collectible based on the quotable Kurt Russell character.

Fans of John Carpenter’s Big Trouble in Little China will likely see striking similarities between Sideshow’s sixth scale figure and Russell’s memorable role from the 1986 film. Wearing his iconic T-shirt under a denim jacket, this Jack Burton depiction is accompanied by Lo Pang’s floating eye monster that has likely invaded more than a few nightmares of viewers over the years.

With a furrowed brow and slightly parted lips, this figure’s facial expressions perfectly capture Burton’s bewilderment at the strange, phenomenal things he saw in Chinatown the deeper he dove into Lo Pang’s world. The collectible’s resemblance to Russell »

- Derek Anderson

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When You Love a TV Show But Don’t Want a Second Season

20 July 2016 2:22 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Stranger Things and more great series should be one and done.

In the ever-shrinking distinction between movies and television, series like Stranger Things can seem like a very long feature rather than an episodic show. Especially when they’re dumped all at once via Netflix, the individual parts add together to form a whole in our binge-watching minds. I have a favorite episode of Stranger Things — part three, “Holly, Jolly” — but it’s mostly just that because its climax was the point where I decided I had to keep going nonstop with my investment in the series. I recognize that it’s basically just the ending of the first act of a 400-minute movie, the point in the narrative where we’re meant to be fully drawn in.

If the eight-episode first season of Stranger Things is a singular work, like a feature film, then a second season would be like a movie sequel. And »

- Christopher Campbell

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Great Job, Internet!: A handy-dandy guide to all the film references in Stranger Things

20 July 2016 8:45 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

The Netflix original series Stranger Things is taking the country by storm. Released just this past Friday, it’s already been binged by many who love its nostalgic throwback to the ’80s with a mashup of Amblin Entertainments, Stephen King stories, aural odes to Steven Spielberg and John Carpenter, and other genre mentions. (For those who are still going through the episodes, there’s the excellent reviews by Emily L. Stephens). It’s fun to pick out the influences of music, TV, books, and film on the series that creators the Duffer brothers have cooked into their homage. Now, thanks to a helpful (and alphabetical) guide by Vulture, fans can see all of the ways that certain films have played into the making of this pop culture phenomenon.

The post, which chronicles all of the major film references in an A-z format, is probably best for those who have completed »

- Rob Dean

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‘Stranger Things’ Fun Facts: Read Great Trivia About Music, Title Sequence & How Stephen King Shaped Filming

19 July 2016 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Netflix’s new sci-fi horror series “Stranger Things” premiered last Friday to positive critical reception, with many critics noting the series’ debts to the work of Steven Spielberg, John Carpenter, and Stephen King. There are many who have already binged the whole series already and there are plenty who still haven’t started, but Netflix has provided some great trivia about the series that will be fun for new or experience viewers.

Read More: Meet ‘Stranger Things’ Breakout Millie Bobby Brown, aka Lucky Number Eleven

For those who are intrigued by the series’ synth score, the composers of the soundtrack are Michael Stein and Kyle Dixon, two members of an Austin synth band called Survive. They have written over 13 hours of music for “Stranger Things.” Meanwhile, the title sequence was inspired by the work of Richard Greenberg, who designed a number of classic 80s title sequences, such as “Alien,” “Altered States, »

- Vikram Murthi

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‘Stranger Things’ Fun Facts: Read Great Trivia About Music, Title Sequence & How Stephen King Shaped Filming

19 July 2016 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Netflix’s new sci-fi horror series “Stranger Things” premiered last Friday to positive critical reception, with many critics noting the series’ debts to the work of Steven Spielberg, John Carpenter, and Stephen King. There are many who have already binged the whole series already and there are plenty who still haven’t started, but Netflix has provided some great trivia about the series that will be fun for new or experience viewers.

Read More: Meet ‘Stranger Things’ Breakout Millie Bobby Brown, aka Lucky Number Eleven

For those who are intrigued by the series’ synth score, the composers of the soundtrack are Michael Stein and Kyle Dixon, two members of an Austin synth band called Survive. They have written over 13 hours of music for “Stranger Things.” Meanwhile, the title sequence was inspired by the work of Richard Greenberg, who designed a number of classic 80s title sequences, such as “Alien,” “Altered States, »

- Vikram Murthi

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Three Review: It’s Out of Ten

19 July 2016 12:44 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Johnnie To’s Three Should Be Subtitled ‘Out of Ten’Fantasia Film Festival 2016

Steven Spielberg’s 1941. Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones. John Carpenter’s Ghosts of Mars. William Friedkin’s Deal of the Century. Dario Argento’s entire post-Opera filmography.

Great directors sometimes make mediocre or downright awful films. It happens to the best, and with the release of Johnnie To’s Three the director of Election, Mad Detective, Drug War, and countless other action gems has joined the club.

Shun (Wallace Chung) is a master criminal whose most recent clash with the law leaves him rushed to a hospital with a bullet in his brain. Inspector Chan (Louis Koo) has been after the thief and his violent gang for a while, and now that he has him he wants Shun to spill details of their next target. Dr. Tong (Vicki Zhao) couldn’t care less about Chan’s needs though as Shun’s condition requires »

- Rob Hunter

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Netflix's Stranger Things: spotting the movie references

19 July 2016 11:07 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Dan Cooper Jul 20, 2016

What 80s pop culture references and nods did you spot in Netflix's Stranger Things? We start the ball rolling...

Warning: contains spoilers for Stranger Things.

The term ‘love letter’ gets thrown around a lot these days: citing a few signature texts as being influential in the creation of your movie or TV show is now directorial de rigeur. Not only is it a method proven to pull in fans of those classics seeking to slake their ravenous nostalgic urges, it’s also a great way to borrow a dash of glamour, to stand on the shoulders of giants as it were.

That said, Netflix’s new show, Stranger Things is not one of those love letters. This is no scribbled declaration of romance, hastily scrawled on a Post-It note and hurled at the back of your head. This is a Shakespearean sonnet of a love letter – an artfully constructed declaration of adoration, »

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Newswire: Take an exclusive look at Scored To Death, a new book of interviews with horror composers

19 July 2016 10:18 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

The new book Scored To Death collects 14 interviews with composers primarily known for their sonic contributions to horror cinema, including members of the band Goblin, Harry Manfredini—the guy who came up with “ki, ki, ki, ki, ma, ma, ma, ma” for Friday The 13th—and the man behind arguably the most memorable horror theme of all time, John Carpenter. Scored To Death will be released later this summer, but author J. Blake Fichera offered The A.V. Club exclusive insight into the process of turning this book from a nightmare to a reality.

“I guess the fact that it hadn’t been done yet is really the reason why I wrote it,” Fichera says of a book focusing on horror movie music. “I really just wanted to read a book like this. There were some great interview-based books about film music, but none specifically focusing of horror film ...

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- Mike Vanderbilt

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Nostalgia on TV? It's nothing new

18 July 2016 2:58 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Louisa Mellor Jul 19, 2016

Netflix's Stranger Things may be a nostalgia-fest, but that's not new. TV has always let us escape into comforting stories about the past…

Remember the good old days? They were good weren’t they? Not like now. It’s horrible now. That’s why everything on TV is comforting, coddling, backwards-looking fluff. We all just want to dive onto a feathery pile of period television and forget about the cruel, unsettling world of today. A world where, get this, the Soviets have gone into space. And there’s that war in Korea. Everyone’s testing hydrogen bombs all over the place, Castro’s taken over Cuba and innocent people keep getting lynched. I ask you. It’s little wonder all we want to watch on TV are cosy Westerns. Switch on Gunsmoke and all that worry melts away.

Fast-forward a few decades to now, when the release »

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Great Job, Internet!: Listen to John Carpenter’s scarily fun rock ’n’ roll record from 1985

18 July 2016 1:30 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

It’s been said that every musician wants to be a filmmaker and every filmmaker wants to be a musician. John Carpenter has been doing both for over 40 years, taking on writing, directing, and composing duties for most of his films. Carpenter is currently playing rock star, on tour promoting his two Lost Themes records, playing rearranged versions of his classic film themes to sold-out audiences around the world. In 1985, the horror master recorded an album’s worth of material alongside Nick Castle (the original Michael Myers) and Tommy Lee Wallace, who worked as production designer and editor on 1978’s Halloween before going on to write and direct the Carpenter-produced Halloween III: Season Of The Witch. Recorded as The Coupe De Villes, Waiting Out The Eighties was never meant to be officially released and only given out to friends and family. Well, one of those friends and »

- Mike Vanderbilt

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Bed Of The Dead Review [Fantasia Fest 2016]

17 July 2016 7:30 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

No, this is not a remake of 1977’s Death Bed: The Bed That Eats. Yes, this is a Wholly new horror story about mysterious deaths that occur because of a deadly connection to bedroom furniture. Bed Of The Dead is a real, 100% serious thriller produced by the same team responsible for Bite, so that should clue you in on the expected amount of zaniness here. Yet, I guarantee it’ll be infinitely straighter than you’re expecting, as writers Cody Calahan and Jeff Maher spend zero time fucking around with generics. This is a uniquely twisted slice of freakishly-fresh horror that makes its bed and kills in it too, never abandoning sinister chills for anything cheap, cheesy or gimmicky. This is “Wtf” horror, even with such a ridiculous premise.

For Ren’s (Dennis Andres) most recent birthday, he wants to participate in a foursome (didn’t expect to start there, »

- Matt Donato

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The Upside Down: 8 questions about 'Stranger Things' season 1

17 July 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

On Friday, Netflix debuted the eight-episode first season of Stranger Things, an unapologetic ode to Steven Spielberg, Stephen King, John Carpenter, and all the other horror and suspense tropes of the early '80s that the Duffer Brothers love. I reviewed it last week, and I'm assuming some of you watched it all over the weekend, which means it's time to talk about the show — with full spoilers for the whole season — coming up just as soon as I steal some Eggos from the supermarket... Rather than do an episode-by-episode breakdown of something that's very much just one long story — and one that, as I said in the earlier review, avoids the usual Netflix pacing problems by only running eight hours — I thought I'd pick eight of the topics and moments from the season that struck me, starting with »

- Alan Sepinwall

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‘Boo! A Madea Halloween’ Trailer: Tyler Perry’s Horror Film Looks Wonderfully Insane

15 July 2016 2:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There will be tricks, there will be treats and all hell will break loose in Tyler Perry’s first horror-comedy, “Boo! A Madea Halloween.” After releasing the first poster for the feature, the official trailer has arrived, courtesy of Lionsgate.

In the latest Madea adventure, the tough and stubborn gal reluctantly ends up having to babysit a group of wild teenagers on Halloween night. While the misbehaving teens figure out a way to go to a huge party around the corner, Madea and her friends wind up in the middle of mayhem, fending off killers, paranormal poltergeists, ghosts, ghouls and zombies.

Read More: Tyler Perry’s ‘Boo! A Madea Halloween’ Pays Homage to John Carpenter’s ‘Halloween’ in New Poster

The hilarious trailer starts off with eerie music and a hellish looking clown creeping around. As he approaches Madea with musical clown box, she yells at him to not get »

- Liz Calvario

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Poster and trailer for Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween

15 July 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tyler Perry’s Madea returns this Halloween with the creatively-titled Boo! A Madea Halloween, and we’ve got a trailer for the film here, along with a poster which pays homage to John Carpenter’s 1978 horror classic; check them out below…

In Tyler Perry’S Boo! A Madea Halloween, Madea winds up in the middle of mayhem when she spends a hilarious, haunted Halloween fending off killers, paranormal poltergeists, ghosts, ghouls and zombies while keeping a watchful eye on a group of misbehaving teens.

Boo! A Madea Halloween is set for release on October 21st.

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- Amie Cranswick

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Review: ‘Stranger Things’ is Still Waiting for Something New, To Make It Feel Alive

15 July 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

During the buildup to “Stranger Things,” the Indiana-set Netflix original series was a bit hard to describe. Sure, it was about a group of kids searching for their missing friend who disappeared under suspicious circumstances, but what kind of show was it? “Was it a horror show? A kids’ show? A drama with kids but made for adults? Sci-fi that looked like a drama? Could my kids watch it? But would I like it? Wait — is that Winona Ryder?”

Well, after watching just a few minutes of The Duffer Brothers’ (as Matt and Ross Duffer dub themselves) eight-episode original series, it’s immediately clear what it is: It’s the PG-rated ’80s movie that would land a PG-13 today — your “Jaws,” “Indiana Jones,” and, yes, “E.T.” and 1977’s “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”

The latter two examples are what the brothers draw from specifically (those and, oddly enough, “Halloween »

- Ben Travers

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Review: ‘Stranger Things’ is Still Waiting for Something New, To Make It Feel Alive

15 July 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

During the buildup to “Stranger Things,” the Indiana-set Netflix original series was a bit hard to describe. Sure, it was about a group of kids searching for their missing friend who disappeared under suspicious circumstances, but what kind of show was it? “Was it a horror show? A kids’ show? A drama with kids but made for adults? Sci-fi that looked like a drama? Could my kids watch it? But would I like it? Wait — is that Winona Ryder?”

Well, after watching just a few minutes of The Duffer Brothers’ (as Matt and Ross Duffer dub themselves) eight-episode original series, it’s immediately clear what it is: It’s the PG-rated ’80s movie that would land a PG-13 today — your “Jaws,” “Indiana Jones,” and, yes, “E.T.” and 1977’s “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”

The latter two examples are what the brothers draw from specifically (those and, oddly enough, “Halloween »

- Ben Travers

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Star Trek Beyond review

15 July 2016 11:59 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Published Date  Friday, July 15, 2016 - 20:00

Ever since Jj Abrams launched the rebooted, more action-oriented Star Trek franchise in 2009, the Enterprise crew's five-year mission has remained tantalisingly out of reach. The first in the series - an effervescent, often charming introduction to the new Kirk, Spock, Bones and so on - teased the possibility of space exploration with its "where no one has gone before" voice over. But 2013's Star Trek Into Darkness saw the mission postponed yet again thanks in part to the murderous antics of one John Harrison - a rasping-voiced, predatory Benedict Cumberbatch.

Star Trek Beyond, on the other hand, finally sees Kirk and his crew head off into the final frontier. The emphasis on fast-pacing and action from the previous two movies is still front-and-centre, but Beyond still feels more like an episode of the Original Series writ large than either of Jj Abrams' earlier entries. »

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Netflix's Stranger Things spoiler-free review

15 July 2016 8:15 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Louisa Mellor Jul 15, 2016

Sci-fi horror Stranger Things provides a welcome dose of comforting nostalgia. Here's a spoiler-free review...

In one scene of Netflix’s 1980s-set sci-fi horror Stranger Things, a kid’s mum lets him stay home from school and as a treat, offers to drive him to the video store so he can pick out anything he wants, no matter how scary.

If your heart gave an involuntary lurch reading that, a yearning, nostalgic twinge for the comforts of VHS cassettes, nice mums and days off school, I suspect you’re going to love this series.

Stranger Things is essentially Netflix driving us all to the video store for armfuls of our favourite 80s films: Poltergeist. E.T. The Goonies. The Thing… If you worship at those same movie altars, you’re in for a treat.

The nostalgia is so enjoyable in fact, you may as well go the whole »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002 | 2001 | 1970

1-20 of 335 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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