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1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Review: Woody Allen's "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy" (1982), Twilight Time Blu-ray Edition

6 hours ago | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

“Smiles Of A Chekhovian Night”

By Raymond Benson

Most cinephiles know that Woody Allen is a huge fan of Ingmar Bergman. Allen has paid homage to the Swedish master several times, and his 1982 work, A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy, is an example. It draws upon one of Bergman’s very few comedies, Smiles of a Summer Night (1955), which is also the basis of the Stephen Sondheim Broadway musical and later film, A Little Night Music.

Smiles takes place at the turn of the last century (1800s to 1900s) in a rural village in Sweden, and the story follows the bawdy escapades of several couples. Likewise, Allen’s Midsummer takes place in the same time period, although the story is transplanted to “the country” somewhere in New York state, and concerns an ensemble of six characters—three couples—who also embark on bawdy escapades.

Bergman’s original film, in turn, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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‘The Squid and the Whale’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

11 hours ago | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Jesse Eisenberg, Jeff Daniels, Laura Linney, Owen Kline, William Baldwin, David Benger, Anna Paquin | Written and Directed by Noah Baumbach

As they bicker over the tennis net and over the dinner table, there’s tension in the Berkman family from the start. The year is 1986, and a pair of middle class Brooklyn parents are on the cusp of divorce. As we discover, it’s been coming for a long time. Joan (Laura Linney) had an affair for four years. Bernard (Jeff Daniels) is jealous of his wife’s blossoming career, as he finds his own on a down slope.

Upon hearing the devastating news of the separation, the younger son Frank (Owen Kline) starts speaking obscenely and behaving obscener. His older brother Walt (Jesse Eisenberg) is more measured in his grief, but his cocky swagger is no more convincing a mask for the pain. As Joan and Bernard bellow, »

- Rupert Harvey

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Sundance Film Review: ‘L.A. Times’

18 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The challenge of finding the right romantic partner seems to be the theme of every other American indie at Sundance, and “L.A. Times” definitely suffers from privileged-white-people-natter-on-about-their-relationships fatigue. But first-time writer-director (and also star) Michelle Morgan brings just enough specificity, and a surprisingly sharp eye, to make the film an interesting calling card for future work. Whether there’s anything here that will appeal beyond a very small niche audience is another matter.

With a heavy dose of Whit Stillman and sprinklings of Woody Allen, Noah Baumbach, and Lena Dunham, among others, Morgan leans on her influences in exploring the intersecting lives and romances of three thirtysomething Angelenos, beginning with Annette (Morgan), an aspiring writer whose withering judgment of everyone and everything in her life proves impossibly irritating.

Annette’s boyfriend Elliot (Jorma Taccone) is the creator of a Z-grade “Game of Thrones” knockoff called “Haggard’s Landing,” which has »

- Geoff Berkshire

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Kristen Stewart On Her “Masochistic” Directorial Debut ‘Come Swim’: “It’s Not A Small Movie” – Sundance Studio

21 January 2017 12:31 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

As an actress, she’s worked with a number of today’s auteurs such as Woody Allen, Jodie Foster, Olivier Assayas and Sean Penn, and now Kristen Stewart is stepping behind the camera with her directorial debut short Come Swim. Reminiscent of Terrence Malick’s cinematic poetry in its metaphorical, visceral images and whispering voiceovers by Stewart, Come Swim follows a young man’s emotional pan as he is oversaturated and then parched by water. He’s played by Josh Kaye, a… »

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Michelle Morgan’s ‘L.A. Times’ Is A Funny, Woody Allen-Esque Look At Singlehood In Hollywood [Sundance Review]

21 January 2017 7:03 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

When a film is named after a city, it had better have something to say about the town — especially if it’s taking the name of one of the biggies, like London, Paris, or New York. Writer-director-star Michelle Morgan’s “L.A. Times” is unquestionably “a Los Angeles movie,” in that it makes great use of the hills, valleys, galleries, and bars around the city as the backdrop for an episodic romantic comedy.

Continue reading Michelle Morgan’s ‘L.A. Times’ Is A Funny, Woody Allen-Esque Look At Singlehood In Hollywood [Sundance Review] at The Playlist. »

- Noel Murray

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‘Landline’ Charms Sundance With Winning Cast and ’90s Vibe

20 January 2017 7:47 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Landline” will not sell first or go for the highest price at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, but the unflinchingly sentimental comedy from writer-director Gillian Robespierre warmed a world premiere audience at the Eccles Center Theater Friday afternoon and is likely to find a buyer by the time the next big snow passes through Park City.

Writer-director Gillian Robespierre’s second feature (after 2014’s “Obvious Child”)  brings just about everything an adult (and likely a younger) audience could want with this story about the durability of love and family that includes a large dose of 1990s nostalgia. Tested by indiscretions and emotional drift, the ties between two sisters and their well-intentioned parents are challenged time and again.

Critics too are likely to warm to the fresh story and the uniformly strong performances from Edie Falco, John Turturro, Jay Duplass, Finn Wittrock and, especially, Jenny Slate and Abby Quinn, as »

- James Rainey

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Jonathan Rhys Meyers to Star in Cop Thriller ‘Blue on Blue’ (Exclusive)

19 January 2017 2:20 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jonathan Rhys Meyers is in final talks to take the lead role in police thriller “Blue on Blue” with Jon Amiel directing and Meyers Media Group producing.

Inspired by true events, “Blue on Blue” follows a corrupt police officer who uses his extensive charm and guile to ensnare an unsuspecting rookie cop in a daring web of deceit and betrayal. His ruthless ambition in the cover-up of another cop’s murder triggers a gang war that threatens to destroy the naive rookie.

Amiel will direct from a script by David Chisholm, based on a story by Edward Brehm, David Chisholm and Ethan Cohan. Lawrence Steven Meyers and Randy Dannenberg are producing for Meyers Media Group along with Brendan McDonald for McDonald Media.

Executive producers are John Evangelides and Jonathan Tybel; co-producers are Brehm and Cohan. Meyers Media Group is handling worldwide sales.

Meyers’ credits include Woody Allen’s “Match Point” alongside Scarlett Johansson, »

- Dave McNary

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The Best Movies Directed by Women in 2016

18 January 2017 9:43 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Our 22 Favorite Movies Directed by Women in 2016Looking to support great female-directed films? Start here.

Over the years, we’ve heard from our readers that one of the most important things we can do is to help you discover movies that may have slipped by mainstream audiences. And often just as important, our readers ask that we highlight voices that are in the minority in Hollywood. While we’re known for not taking ourselves very seriously, we take this part of our work seriously. Because as many studies have shown, there are some voices that aren’t as well-represented as others. Them’s the facts.

Beyond that, our team has a passion for seeking out and celebrating films directed by women. This is where we often find, as you’re about to see in this list, some of the most unique and interesting stories in the whole of cinema. Another thing we hear often from readers is »

- Film School Rejects

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When Maureen Stapleton Became Our Grandmother Forever

17 January 2017 12:19 PM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

35 years ago, the actress sang the body electric.

The handful of actresses I associate with motherhood include ’80s movie and TV staples Dee Wallace, Teri Garr, Melinda Dillon, Joanna Kerns, Judith Light, and Meredith Baxter. They were the ones that comforted me when I was a kid. But when it comes to images of grandmothers, only one woman comes to mind: Maureen Stapleton.

On January 17, 1982, Stapleton was only 55 years old. She had three Academy Award nominations under her belt and was about to receive her fourth. She would win that Oscar for Best Supporting Actress at the end of March for her performance as Emma Goldman in Reds. But on this particular night, she was on television in the title role of The Electric Grandmother.

The Emmy-nominated NBC special, part of the network’s Peacock Theatre, was co-written by Ray Bradbury based on his 1962 Twilight Zone episode “I Sing the Body Electric,” the »

- Christopher Campbell

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Thierry Fremaux, Marion Cotillard to Be Honored at Lumieres Awards

16 January 2017 11:45 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris – Thierry Fremaux, the artistic director and general delegate of the Cannes Film Festival, and Oscar-winning actress Marion Cotillard will be honored at the Lumieres Awards, France’s equivalent to the Golden Globes.

The academy of the Lumieres Awards, which is composed of Paris-based members of the foreign press, will pay tribute and hand out honorary awards to Cotillard and Fremaux during the 22nd edition of the ceremony Jan. 30.

Since winning an Oscar, a Golden Globe, a Cesar and a Bafta for her role as Edith Piaf in “La vie en rose,” Cotillard has worked with some of the world’s most talented and acclaimed directors, from Michael Mann (“Public Enemies”) to Woody Allen (“Midnight in Paris”), Christopher Nolan (“Inception,” “Dark Night Rises”), Steven Soderbergh (“Contagion”), James Gray (“The Immigrant”) and Robert Zemeckis (“Allied”). Cotillard also starred in the Dardenne brothers’s “Two Days, One Night” and Xavier Dolan’s »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Our 20 Most-Anticipated Films at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival

16 January 2017 9:31 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Comprising a considerable amount of our top 50 films of last year, Sundance Film Festival has proven to yield the first genuine look at what the year in cinema will bring. Now in its 39th iteration, we’ll be heading back to Park City this week, but before we do, it’s time to highlight the films we’re most looking forward to, including documentaries and narrative features from all around the world.

While much of the joy found in the festival comes from surprises throughout the event, below one will find our 20 most-anticipated titles. Check out everything below and for updates straight from the festival, make sure to follow us on Twitter (@TheFilmStage, @jpraup, @djmecca and @FinkJohnJ), and stay tuned to all of our coverage here.

20. Come Swim (Kristen Stewart)

With her pair of career-best performances under the direction of Olivier Assayas, as well as working with Kelly Reichardt, Woody Allen, »

- Jordan Raup

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Retake: Restaging Love with a Hustler

15 January 2017 6:33 PM, PST | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

One can only hope director Nick Corporon's shorts (I've seen two) and his feature debut, Retake, are not autobiographical. All of his male characters are semi-despondent romantics. They find true love, lose true love, or are confronted by a world ready to quash them if they don't assume heteronormative stances or watch Vin Diesel films .

In the poignantly wise, 13-minute "Barbie Boy" (2014), seven-year-old Bobby (Trent Carlton) learns from his dad that boys don't play with Barbie and Ken dolls in public or nearly anywhere else. It doesn't even matter if Bobby just allows the plastic couple to scuba dive in the kitchen sink, smooch in their Dream House, or go out for lattés; the testosterone-fueled world will frown on such carryings-on and possibly do worse than frown. So will the blond-tressed lad stand up to societal pressure and grow up to be Alexander Mc Queen? Or will the little »

- Brandon Judell

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Retake: Restaging Love with a Hustler

15 January 2017 6:31 PM, PST | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

One can only hope director Nick Corporon's shorts (I've seen two) and his feature debut, Retake, are not autobiographical. All of his male characters are semi-despondent romantics. They find true love, lose true love, or are confronted by a world ready to quash them if they don't assume heteronormative stances or watch Vin Diesel films .

In the poignantly wise, 13-minute "Barbie Boy" (2014), seven-year-old Bobby (Trent Carlton) learns from his dad that boys don't play with Barbie and Ken dolls in public or nearly anywhere else. It doesn't even matter if Bobby just allows the plastic couple to scuba dive in the kitchen sink, smooch in their Dream House, or go out for lattés; the testosterone-fueled world will frown on such carryings-on and possibly do worse than frown. So will the blond-tressed lad stand up to societal pressure and grow up to be Alexander Mc Queen? Or will the little »

- Brandon Judell

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Sixteen of 2016: The Best Things I Saw on Film All Year

13 January 2017 2:59 PM, PST | AwardsDaily.com | See recent AwardsDaily news »

At the end of Martin Scorsese’s Silence is a quiet conversation about religion and its place in the state, the community, and the heart. It is reminiscent of the »

- Sasha Stone

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‘Breakable You’ Palm Springs Review: Bright Ensemble Elevates Neurotic Comedy

13 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Breakable You” is like a kinder gentler version of Woody Allen’s “Crime and Misdemeanors”: a rumination on human fallibility and corruption with lower stakes but a lot more sexual heat in its heart. Freely adapted by writer-director Andrew Wagner (“Starting Out in the Evening”) and co-screenwriter Fred Parnes from Brian Morton’s well-reviewed novel, “Breakable You” is the story of the Weller family, a cluster of neurotic New Yorkers who live outwardly charmed but inwardly tempestuous lives. “Matriarch” is perhaps the wrong word for Holly Hunter’s lithe and whippet-thin Eleanor, a character notably more obese in the book. »

- Ray Greene

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Entertainment Feature: Top 20 Celebrity Portraits of 2016, By Photographer Joe Arce

13 January 2017 9:16 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The year 2016 was a dangerous one to be a famous person. In the past twelve months, one dozen of my former photo subjects passed away, celebrities who at one time or another famously posed for my lens. However, on a positive note, at least photos are forever. Or to quote the immortal words of Pee Wee Herman – “Why don’t you take a picture, it will last longer!”

The ranking of the portraits are based on a combination of the star power wattage of the subjects, the artistic results and the difficulty of landing the quarry…for those budding smart-phone-celebrity-stalkers who may wish to play along at home. So without further adieu, I present my top 20 celebrity portraits of 2016.

20. Peter Bogdanovich

Filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Here’s to Peter Bogdanovich, who apart from Woody Allen is one of my all-time favorite directors. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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‘Manifesto’ Trailer: Cate Blanchett Plays 13 Different Roles Embodying Various Artistic Movements

12 January 2017 11:22 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In recent years, Cate Blanchett has racked up widespread acclaim for her performances in films like “Carol,” “Knight of Cups” and especially her Oscar-winning turn in Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine.” Now, she’s set to return in the new film “Manifesto,” in which she will play 13 different roles performing various artistic manifestos. Some of her roles include a homeless person, a TV newscaster and a punk. Watch the film’s new theatrical trailer ahead of its Sundance premiere, courtesy of Yahoo Movies.

Read More: ‘Manifesto’ First Look: Cate Blanchett Channels Lars Von Trier and Jim Jarmusch In Sundance Premiere

Written and directed by Julian Rosefeldt, “Manifesto” began as a multi-screen film installation in 2015. The 130-minute exhibition cut was shot over 12 days in Berlin before premiering at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image from December 9, 2015 to March 14, 2016. The installation was also shown in Berlin at the Museum für Gegenwart, »

- Vikram Murthi

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Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

11 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became »

- Dave McNary

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Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

11 January 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became a member of the WGA East in »

- Dave McNary

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Something Wild (1961)

10 January 2017 12:33 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Something Wild

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 850

1961 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 113 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date January 17, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Carroll Baker, Ralph Meeker, Mildred Dunnock, Jean Stapleton, Martin Kosleck, Charles Watts, Clifton James, Doris Roberts, Anita Cooper, Tanya Lopert.

Cinematography: Eugen Schüfftan

Film Editor: Carl Lerner

Original Music: Aaron Copland

Written by Jack Garfein and Alex Karmel from his novel Mary Ann

Produced by George Justin

Directed by Jack Garfein

 

After writing up an earlier Mod disc release of the 1961 movie Something Wild, I received a brief but welcome email note from its director:

“Dear Glenn Erickson,

Thank you for your profound appreciation of Something Wild.

If possible, I would appreciate if you could send

me a copy of your review by email.

Sincerely yours, Jack Garfein

Somewhere back East (or in London), the Actors Studio legend Jack Garfein had found favor with the review. Although »

- Glenn Erickson

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1970

1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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