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1-20 of 257 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


"Top Five" Ranks At The Top Of The List

2 hours ago | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

Upon popping Top Five into my DVD player, it became immediately apparent to me why so many critics had compared the Chris Rock comedy to Woody Allen’s early work when the film first hit theaters last winter. From the opening shots of the film, when simple white titles on a black screen cut to two smart and stylish individuals in mid-argument on a busy city street, Top Five stylistically echoes Allen’s best movies about love, life and neurotic New Yorkers. Yet that comparison does not do the film justice. Despite these noticeable retro influences, Top Five manages to be the freshest and most modern comedy in years--definitely exceeding the majority Allen’s more recent oeuvre, and pretty much everything else in theaters too.

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- Lee Jutton

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Watch: Video Tribute To The Work Of Legendary Cinematographer Gordon Willis

6 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

When Gordon Willis passed away last May at the age of 82, it was hard not to look back and marvel at the man’s long and illustrious career. He was the cinematographer behind such films as “The Godfather” trilogy, “All the President’s Men,” and “Annie Hall.” The man helped define the look and feel of 1970s American cinema. His bold creative choices and fruitful collaborations made him a favorite of directors such as Francis Ford Coppola, Alan J. Pakula, and Woody Allen. And now, thanks to a video essay by Steven Benedict from Press Play, we can get a closer look at just what made Gordon Willis such a special Dp. Not a word is spoken in this 8-minute video. Instead, Benedict lets the images do the talking. The video selects specific images from nearly every single film Willis worked on, from “Klute” back in 1971 to “The Devil’s »

- Ken Guidry

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Daily | Berlin, Kushner, Timoner

12 hours ago | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In the latest entry in Escape from New York, Reverse Shot's ongoing series on cinephilia around the world, Giovanni Marchini Camia takes us to Berlin. Also in today's roundup of news and views: a major Carl Theodor Dreyer online resource, Rick Alverson on Kornél Mundruczó’s White God, Tom Dicillo on Noah Baumbach's While We're Young, Glenn Kenny on Woody Allen's reputation, interviews with Ondi Timoner, Ellen Burstyn, Keith David, Christopher McDonald and Mark Margolis—and remembering Helmut Dietl. » - David Hudson »

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Hunterrr review – half-hearted look at India's evolving sexual mores

23 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This sex comedy’s lead is creepy and cringeworthy, but at least the film manages to take a small step away from the genre’s usual crass misogyny

Mandar Ponkshe (Gulshan Devaiah), this sex comedy’s eponymous hunter (with extra Rs thrown in for the sheer joy of rolling them off one’s tongue), is single and pushing 40, and much to the consternation of his largely married friends, takes the opportunity to have sex wherever he finds it. Entirely unremarkable in the looks and charm department and employing a scattershot approach to seduction, Mandar is less Don Juan and more Woody Allen. But while Allen’s persona made himself endearing by botching things, Mandar makes us wince. And by being 20 years his targets’ senior by the end of the film, he’s a fully fledged creep.

But creeps have feelings too. This is Harshavardhan Kulkarni’s feature debut and even with its flaws, »

- Faiza S Khan

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Cannes Wish List: 20 Films We Hope to See at the 2015 Festival

31 March 2015 8:17 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Indiewire's annual Cannes wish list isn't so much about officially predicting the lineup, but rather a survey of films we hope are finished in time and considered good enough to make the cut. We're not including films that have zero chances of being ready in time -- or, for that matter, the one film we officially know will be there: "Mad Max: Fury Road" (which is screening out of competition). Among the candidates are celebrated filmmakers such as Jacques Audiard, Woody Allen, Arnaud Desplechin, Cary Fukunaga, Todd Haynes, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Naomi Kawase, Yorgos Lanthimos, Terrence Malick, Jeff Nichols, Gaspard Noé, Paolo Sorrentino, Joachim Trier, Gus Van Sant and Apichatpong Weerasethaul, among many others. Films that don't get a spot in Cannes (and there will definitely be a few) will immediately become hot topics for a fall festival slot in Venice and/or Toronto. But that's then; this is now. »

- Indiewire

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Schtonk! director Helmut Dietl dies aged 70

31 March 2015 | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The German film and TV industries were mourning on Monday the death of director, writer and producer Helmut Dietl from lung cancer. He was 70.

Once described as “the German answer to Woody Allen”, Dietl was known to international audiences largely for his send-up of the fake Hitler diaries saga in the 1992 film Schtonk!, which was subsequently nominated for a best foreign language film Academy Award.

Bavarian-born Dietl had already made a name for himself before Schtonk! on German TV with critically praised audience favourites such as Münchner Geschichten (1974/5), Der Ganz Normale Wahnsinn (1979/80), Monaco Franze and the six-part series Kir Royal, a biting satire on Munich high society and tabloid journalism.

According to the late TV commissioning editor Jörn Klamroth of Cologne’s Wdr, the inspiration for Kir Royal came to Dietl in 1984 when he and the director saw a photo in a cafe showing Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (later Pope Benedict) sitting together with the conservative Bavarian politician »

- screen.berlin@googlemail.com (Martin Blaney)

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Helmut Dietl, 1944-2015

31 March 2015 | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The German film and TV industries were mourning on Monday the death of director, writer and producer Helmut Dietl from lung cancer. He was 70.

Once described as “the German answer to Woody Allen”, Dietl was known to international audiences largely for his send-up of the fake Hitler diaries saga in the 1992 film Schtonk!, which was subsequently nominated for a best foreign language film Academy Award.

Bavarian-born Dietl had already made a name for himself before Schtonk! on German TV with critically praised audience favourites such as Münchner Geschichten (1974/5), Der Ganz Normale Wahnsinn (1979/80), Monaco Franze and the six-part series Kir Royal, a biting satire on Munich high society and tabloid journalism.

According to the late TV commissioning editor Jörn Klamroth of Cologne’s Wdr, the inspiration for Kir Royal came to Dietl in 1984 when he and the director saw a photo in a cafe showing Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (later Pope Benedict) sitting together with the conservative Bavarian politician »

- screen.berlin@googlemail.com (Martin Blaney)

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Film Review: ‘Posthumous’

31 March 2015 3:19 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Relative to its fellow grand European capitals, Berlin’s potential as a romantic playground has been rather under-explored on film, which is reason enough to welcome Lulu Wang’s slight, sprightly art-scene comedy “Posthumous” onto screens. The city’s scruffy-chic bohemian backstreets add pleasingly eccentric edge to an amiable farce predicated on the old maxim that artists are never appreciated in their time, as Brit Marling’s clear-eyed reporter unravels the truth behind the supposed death of Jack Huston’s dreamily tortured genius. The satire is tempered, however, as proceedings inevitably take an amorous turn. Though Wang’s debut feature — which received its North American premiere at the Miami Film Festival — skips a few steps in its tonal tango, it exhibits enough cheery commercial nous to attract distributor attention at the lighter end of the arthouse gallery.

Chinese-American filmmaker Wang, a recipient last year of the Roger and Chaz Ebert Fellowship, »

- Guy Lodge

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Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

29 March 2015 9:47 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of »

- Carmel Dagan

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Gene Saks, Director of Neil Simon on Stage and Screen, Dies at 93

29 March 2015 9:47 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Gene Saks, who helmed many Neil Simon plays on Broadway and won three Tonys — for the Cy Coleman-Michael Stewart musical “I Love My Wife” plus Simon’s “Brighton Beach Memoirs” and “Biloxi Blues” — died Saturday. He was 93.

His wife, Keren, told the New York Times that he died from pneumonia in his East Hampton, N.Y. home.

Saks directed only seven feature films, all of them based on legit works. They included Simon adaptations “The Odd Couple,” “Barefoot in the Park,” “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” and “Brighton Beach Memoirs.” He also directed the 1969 “Cactus Flower,” which earned Goldie Hawn an Oscar for supporting actress.

After helming the hit Broadway musical “Mame,” Saks did the big screen version in 1974. For the film, Lucille Ball played the title character, with many critics complaining that Angela Lansbury could repeat her Broadway triumph. Both the stage and screen versions of »

- Carmel Dagan

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Twilight Time Finds Love and Death in Four Films From the ’60s and ’70s

27 March 2015 9:24 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Twilight Time released five titles in February, and while their monthly selections never really have an official theme between them four of the films share something of a common thread this time — the importance of love and the inevitability of death. To Sir, With Love follows a reluctant teacher’s efforts to empower teenagers to respect others and themselves, and he wins their hearts in the process. The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre is Roger Corman’s take on one of the more infamous gangland killings from the ’20s. Lenny features Dustin Hoffman in Bob Fosse’s biographical film about famed and troubled comedian Lenny Bruce. Finally, and fittingly, Woody Allen’s Love and Death is about both of those things. I haven’t seen the fifth title, Stormy Weather, so we’ll just have to presume that someone in it loves and/or dies. To Sir, With Love (1967) Mark Thackeray (Sidney Poitier) is an engineer in »

- Rob Hunter

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Beyond Fright Interview With The Wrecking Crew Director Denny Tedasco!!

27 March 2015 12:31 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

If you haven’t had a chance to check out Denny Tedesco’s The Wrecking Crew, then you should stop everything you are doing and watch it right this minute. This film goes above and beyond what you would expect in a documentary, and contains the perfect mixture of music, interviews, and photographs to tell the story of a group of talented musicians that made musical history, and will forever be known as The Wrecking Crew. Recently, I had a chance to sit down and talk to the Director, Denny Tedesco, as he tells us all about this must see film, his father, Tommy Tedesco, and of course, how he put this amazing documentary together.

 

How did the idea for The Wrecking Crew documentary come about?

Well, I’ve always had the idea of doing something about my Dad and his friends, I was into film making, I have always been into film, »

- Natty

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'While We're Young' (2015) Movie Review

27 March 2015 8:36 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The hipster vibe in writer/director Noah Baumbach's While We're Young eventually became too much for me to bear. Looking back on it now, it begins immediately with quotes from Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen's "The Master Builder" expressing an aging generation's fear of the younger generation. This is a general theme on which the film focuses as it explores a couple in their mid-40s and the discontent that has set in as their friends are all having children, becoming the societal definition of what it means to be an adult. For the first 30 minutes or so I'm rolling with this, but once While We're Young gets knee deep into its story I found myself drowning in a subculture with which I can't connect or even understand. The film's test subjects are Josh and Cornelia (Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts), a mid-40s couple on the edge of a mid-life crisis, »

- Brad Brevet

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While We’re Young: Ben Stiller in Crisis Mode

27 March 2015 | Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy | See recent Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy news »

It might seem premature for filmmaker Noah Baumbach and his screen alter-ego Ben Stiller to be having a mid-life crisis, along with wife Naomi Watts, but the situation is explored with empathy and wit in While We’re Young. Although the finished product is a bit lumpy it still represents an individual voice and point of view, within the framework of a contemporary comedy infused with the Woody Allen-ish flavor of New York City. Stiller plays a egotistic documentary filmmaker who’s been stalled on his latest project for a decade. His mostly-happy marriage to Watts is shadowed by the fact that they’ve given up on having children after several failed attempts. Now, as their friends...

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]] »

- Leonard Maltin

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Woody Allen, Pixar and Cate Blanchett: Are These the Films Going to Cannes 2015?

26 March 2015 1:21 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Cannes 2015 Poster Sends a Love Letter to Ingrid Bergman With three weeks to go before the Cannes Film Festival unveils its official lineup, Variety is making some predictions as to what will be included, including the latest Pixar 3D animated feature and new films from Woody Allen, Todd Haynes, Jeff Nichols, Denis Villeneuve and Arnaud Desplechin. Allen's "Irrational Man," starring Joaquin Phoenix and Emma Stone, is said to be a darker, less comedic Allen picture, along the same lines as "Match Point." Phoenix plays a small-town college professor who starts an illicit relationship with one of his students (Stone). The Sony Classics release opens July 24. Another contender is Disney/Pixar's animated "Inside Out," from director Pete Docter (who co-directed with Ronaldo Del Carmen). Docter's acclaimed feature "Up" opened the festival in 2009. Set to open June 19, "Inside Out" is a comic fantasy about the life of »

- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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Cannes: New Movies From Pixar, Woody Allen Expected at 68th Film Festival

26 March 2015 11:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are still three weeks to go before the Cannes Film Festival unveils its official-selection lineup, but so far, the latest Pixar 3D animated extravaganza and new films from Woody Allen, Todd Haynes, Jeff Nichols, Denis Villeneuve and Arnaud Desplechin appear to be securing their positions in the event’s 68th annual edition (May 13-24).

In keeping with his longtime habit of avoiding festival accolades, Allen will likely receive an out-of-competition berth for his 45th feature, “Irrational Man,” starring Joaquin Phoenix and Emma Stone (who starred in the director’s “Magic in the Moonlight”). Among other U.S. fare, Cannes will get an early start on the summer blockbuster season with Disney/Pixar’s feature toon “Inside Out,” marking a second trip to the Croisette for director Pete Docter (who co-helmed with Ronaldo Del Carmen) after his “Up” opened the festival in 2009. As already announced, George Miller’s “Mad Max: Fury Road, »

- Justin Chang and Elsa Keslassy

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Watch: Rare 33-Minute, 1979 Interview With Woody Allen Shot For French Television

26 March 2015 10:59 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The end of the '70s was a transitional time for Woody Allen. After making a name as the master of goofy comedies and satires, he gravitated towards drama at the end of the decade. “Annie Hall” and especially “Manhattan” contained many insightful dramatic moments, even though they were categorized as romantic comedies. Sandwiched in between those two films was the uber-drama “Interiors," Allen’s fittingly dour tribute to his idol Ingmar Bergman. During a rare 30-minute interview filmed as part of a 1979 French TV documentary titled "Question de Temps: Une Heure Avec Woody Allen," unearthed by Eyes on Cinema, Allen’s uncertainty and confusion about where his career will go during the '80s becomes very obvious. Bear in mind that while he gave the interview, Allen was preparing to begin production on "Stardust Memories," his homage to Federico Fellini’s "8 1/2," as well as a film about his recent »

- Oktay Ege Kozak

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Will Ferrell: His Ten Best Films

26 March 2015 9:32 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Consider this a bit of an experiment today. Instead of doing something like what I used to do with the Spotlight on the Stars series, I’m going to try honoring an actor or a filmmaker with a personalized top ten list. We’ll start off with none other than Will Ferrell, who happens to have the new comedy Get Hard hitting theaters this weekend. This initial piece will look at the ten best movies he’s been in, as opposed to just his best performances, but those will be contained within this list too, of course, so fear not. Anyway, let’s give this a shot and see how it goes! Here now, without any delay, are the ten best films that Ferrell has found himself a cast member in… 10. The Producers – Though a pale comparison to the original Mel Brooks movie (or the Broadway production), this remake of »

- Joey Magidson

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Here's another reason to be creeped out by Woody Allen

26 March 2015 9:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Not a huge surprise, but: Woody Allen tried to seduce Mariel Hemingway when she was 18 years old. The revelation appears in Hemingway's upcoming memoir "Out Came the Sun," in which the actress and star of Allen's 1979 film "Manhattan" describes how the Oscar-winning filmmaker invited her on a trip to Paris after her 18th birthday, and even went so far as to fly out to her parents' Idaho home to ask for their permission. She relates telling her parents “that I didn’t know what the arrangement was going to be, that I wasn’t sure if I was even going to have my own room. Woody hadn’t said that. He hadn’t even hinted it. But I wanted them to put their foot down. They didn’t. They kept lightly encouraging me.” It says a lot about Allen's power and influence -- not to mention the less-enlightened era in »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Fact, Fiction and The Kidnapping Of Michel Houellebecq

26 March 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Judging from his books and many of his public statements, French author Michel Houellebecq has a taste for politically incorrect provocation. Guillaume Nicloux’s The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq, a narrative film in which Houellebecq plays himself, shows a different side of the writer. Dramatizing a mysterious three-day period in the writer’s life in which he disappeared from a book tour by suggesting that he was kidnapped and taken to a small town in France, it shows a Houellebecq who acts like a Woody Allen-ish nebbish. The film’s treatment of its narrative is more comic than menacing, and Houellebecq comes off as quite likable, even charming. I talked to Nicloux in early March.>> - Steven Erickson »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1970

1-20 of 257 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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