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Orson Welles More at IMDbPro »

Other works
(1934- 1962). Active on Broadway in the following productions:

(1934). Stage Play: Romeo and Juliet. Tragedy (revival). Written by William Shakespeare. Choreographed by Martha Graham. Scenic Design by Jo Mielziner. Directed by Guthrie McClintic. Martin Beck Theatre: 20 Dec 1934- Feb 1935 (closing date unknown/77 performances). Cast: Brian Aherne (as "Mercutio, kinsman to the prince and friend to Romeo"), Edith Allaire, Gilmore Bush, Robert Champlain, Arthur Chatterton, Katharine Cornell (as "Juliet, daughter to Capulet"), Margaret Craven, Jacqueline DeWit, Angus Duncan, John Emery (as "Benvolio, nephew to Montague and friend to Romeo"), Edith Evans (as "Nurse to Juliet"), Reynolds Evans (as "Escalus, Prince of Verona"), Brenda Forbes (as "Lady Montague, wife to Montague"), John Gordon Gage, Franklin Gray, William Hopper, Lois Jameson, Agnete Johannson, Paul Julian, George Macready (as "Paris, a young nobleman, kinsman to the prince"), Ruth March, Irby Marshall (as "Lady Capulet"), Albert McCleery, John Miltern (as "Montague"), Irving Morrow, Ralph Nelson, Moroni Olsen (as "Capulet"), Basil Rathbone (as "Romeo, son of Montague"), Pamela Simpson, Charles R. Thorne, David Vivian, Charles Waldron, Orson Welles (as "Tybalt, nephew to Lady Capulet/Chorus") [Broadway debut]. Produced by Katharine Cornell.

(1935). Stage Play: Panic. Drama. Written by Archibald Macleish. Scenic Design by Jo Mielziner. Directed by James Light. Imperial Theatre: 14 Mar 1935- 15 Mar 1935 (2 performances). Cast: Wesley Addy (as "Unemployed/Male Chorus") [Broadway debut], Osceola Archer (as "Female Chorus"), Amelia Barleon, Elaine Basil, Robin Batcheller, Abner Biberman (as "Unemployed"), William Challee (as "Unemployed"), Russell Collins (as "A Man"), Walter Coy, Margaret Craven, Joseph Eggenton, Paul Genge, George Glass, Clifford Heckinger, Dierdre Hurst, Zita Johann (as "Ione"), Harold Johnsrud (as "Blind Man"), Tony Kraber [credited as Gerrit Kraber] (as "A Man"), Eva Langbord (as "A Young Girl"), Albert Lewis (as "Unemployed"), Yisrol Libman, Margot Loines, Edward Mann, Rose McClendon (as "An Old Woman"), Harold McGee, Elizabeth Morison, Gordon Nelson, John O'Shaughnessy, LaVerne Pine, Beatrice Pons, Joanna Roos, Arthur Singer, Lucille Strudwick, Karl Swenson (as "A Young Man"), Mary Tarcai (as "Female Chorus"), Jerome Thor, Paula Trueman, Eric Walz, Orson Welles (as "McGafferty"), Virginia Welles (as "Female Chorus") [Broadway debut], Richard Whorf (as "Griggs"), Dane Clark (as "A Young Man") [Broadway debut]. Produced by Phoenix Theatre Inc.

(1936). Stage Play: Macbeth. Tragedy. Written by William Shakespeare. Arranged in three acts and eight scenes by Orson Welles. Scenic Design by Nat Karson. Costume Design by Nat Karson. Lighting Design by A.H. Feder. Directed by Orson Welles. Lafayette Theatre: 9 Apr 1936- May 1936 (closing date unknown/56 performances). Cast: Abdul (as "Witch Doctor"), Thomas Anderson (as "Lennox, a nobleman"), Service Bell (as "Duncan, King of Scotland"), Gabriel Brown (as "Captain"), Eric Burroughs (as "Hecate"), Jack Carter (as "Macbeth, a general of the Scottish army"), Laurence Chenault (as "Doctor"), Charles Collins (as "Lord"), Carl Crawford (as "Fleance, son of Banquo"), William Cumberbatch (as "Chamberlain"), Frank David (as "Ross, a nobleman"), Viola Dean (as "Page"), Alma Dickson (as "Lady Macbeth, The Duchess"), Maurice Ellis (as "Macduff, a nobleman of Scotland"), Hilda French (as "Page"), Virginia Girvin (as "The Nurse"), Lisle Grenidge (as "Captain"), Bertram Holmes (as "Young Macduff") [Broadway debut], Halle Howard (as "Chamberlain"), J. Louis Johnson (as "Porter"), J.B. Johnson (as "Second Messenger"), Zola King (as "Third Witch"), Larri Lauria (as "Seton, an officer attending on Macbeth"), Canada Lee (as "Banquo, a general of the Scottish army"), Albert McCoy (as "Attendant"), George Nixon (as "First Murderer"), Kenneth Renwick (as "Second Murderer"), Wardell Saunders (as "Malcolm, son of Duncan"), Archie Savage (as "Siward"), Edna Thomas (as "Lady Macbeth"), George Thomas (as "Attendant"), Philandre Thomas (as "First Messenger"), Al Watts (as "The Priest"), Josephine Williams (as "Second Witch"), Wilhelmina Williams (as "First Witch"), Marie Young (as "Lady Macduff"). Produced by Negro Theatre Unit of the Federal Theatre Project of the WPA and John Houseman. Notes: (1) This infamous production became known as the "Voodoo" Macbeth. (2) This production was profiled in the short film documentary We Work Again (1937), produced by the Federal Works Project.

(1936). Stage Play: Horse Eats Hat. Book adapted by Edwin Denby [earliest Broadway credit] and Orson Welles. Based on "Un Chapeau de Paille D'Italie" by Eugene Labiche. Music by Paul Bowles [earliest Broadway credit]. Music arranged by Virgil Thomson. Musical Director: Virgil Thomson. Directed by Orson Welles. Maxine Elliott Theatre: 26 Sep 1936- Nov 1936 (closing date unknown/61 performances). Cast: Wallace Acton (as "Ensemble"), Tereon Alvarez (as "Ensemble"), May Angels (as "Ensemble"), George Armstrong (as "Ensemble"), Bill Baird (as "Ensemble"), George Barter (as "Berkowitz"), France Bendsten (as "Gustave"), Tod Brown (as "Ensemble"), Sarah Burton (as "The Countess"), Walter Burton (as "Butler"), Michael Callaghan (as "Ensemble"), Terry Carlson (as "Ensemble"), Steven Carter (as "First Footman"), Enrico Cellinl (as "Raguso"), Mildred Colt (as "Ensemble"), Joseph Cotten (as "Freddy"), Pell Dentler (as "Ensemble"), George Duthie (as "Entwhistle"), Georgia Empry (as "Ensemble"), Opal Essant (as "Ensemble"), Julia Fassett (as "Ensemble"), Arlene Francis (as "Tillie"), Warren Goddard (as "Ensemble"), Anna Gold (as "Ensemble"), Solomon Goldstein (as "Ensemble"), Craig Gordon (as "Ensemble"), Jane Hale (as "Ensemble"), Peggy Hartley (as "Ensemble"), Lawrence Hawley (as "Ensemble"), J. Headley (as "Second Footman"), Edwin Hemmer (as "Ensemble"), Jerry Hitchcock (as "Ensemble"), Rubert Hopkins (as "Ensemble"), Don Howard (as "Ensemble"), Jane Johnson (as "Ensemble"), Marie Jones (as "Ensemble"), Henriette Kaye (as "Daisy"), Frank Kelly (as "Ensemble"), Helene Korsun (as "Ensemble"), Mary Kukavski (as "Ensemble"), Henry Laird (as "Ensemble"), Paula Laurence (as "Agatha Entwhistle") [Broadway debut], Geraldine Law (as "Ensemble"), George Leach (as "Ensemble"), Walter LeRoy (as "Ensemble"), Bernard Lewis (as "Ensemble"), Donald MacMillan (as "Uncle Adolphe"), Margaret Maley (as "Ensemble"), Elizabeth Malone (as "Ensemble"), Harry McKee (as "Joseph"), Harry Merchant (as "Ensemble"), Lee Molnar (as "Ensemble"), Annie Morton, Edgerton Paul (as "Augustus"), Myron Paulson (as "Ensemble"), James Perry (as "Ensemble"), Hattie Rappaport (as "Ensemble"), Helena Rapport (as "Ensemble"), Lucy Rodriguez (as "Clotilda"), Henry Russelle (as "Ensemble"), Nina Salama (as "Ensemble"), Bernard Savage (as "Corporal"), Gloria Sheldon (as "Ensemble"), Hiram Sherman (as "Bobbin"), Harry Singer (as "Ensemble"), Jack Smith (as "Ensemble"), Sidney Smith (as "Grimshot"), George Smithfield (as "Ensemble"), Arabella St. James (as "Ensemble"), Dana Stevens (as "Queeper"), June Thorne (as "Ensemble"), Charles Uday (as "Ensemble"), Orson Welles (as "Mugglethorp"), Virginia Welles (as "Myrtle Mugglethorp") [final Broadway role], Arthur Wood (as "Ensemble"), Ellen Worth (as "Ensemble"), Victor Wright (as "Ensemble"). Produced by Classic Theatre Branch of the Federal Theatre Project of the WPA. Managing Producer: John Houseman. Assistant Producer: Ted Thomas.

(1936). Stage Play: Ten Million Ghosts. Drama. Written by Sidney Kingsley. Scenic Design by Donald Oenslager. Directed by Sidney S. Kingsley. St. James Theatre: 23 Oct 1936- Nov 1936 (closing date unknown/11 performances). Cast: Lester Alden (as "Balkan/Waiter"), Dave Arthur (as "Spewack"), Carroll Ashburn (as "General Louvet"), Lee Baker (as "Francois de Kruif"), Peter Barry (as "Telegraph Boy"), Felton Bickley (as "Armed Guard/Bonnard"), Philip Bourneuf (as "Lessay"), Charles Bowden (as "Messenger Boy"), George Coulouris (as "Zacharey"), Stuart Ferguson (as "Soldier"), Martin Gabel (as "Peter"), Myles Geoffrey (as "Louis/Aide to Louvet"), John Harding (as "Orderly"), Ray Harper (as "Gabry"), Alfred Hesse (as "Muller"), Otto Hulett (as "Ryan"), Stanley Jessup (as "Shore"), George Justin (as "Messenger Boy"), David Leight (as "French Worker/Butler"), Bernard Lenrow (as "Red Cross Sergeant"), David Merrill (as "Thomas"), Dodson Mitchell (as "Otto von Kruif"), Meg Mundy (as "Secretary"), Barbara O'Neil (as "Madeleine"), C. Russell Sage (as "General Dumont/Jones"), James Sidney (as "Anderson"), Joseph Singer (as "German Worker"), Howard Solness (as "Foreman"), Kurt Stall (as "Intelligence Officer"), John Walker (as "Dr. La Marr/Roberts"), Orson Welles (as "Andre"), Robert X. Williams (as "Schmidt"). Produced by Sidney Kingsley.

(1937). Stage Play: Dr. Faustus. Comedy (revival). Incidental music by Edward Bowles. Written by Christopher Marlowe. Production Design by Kirk Glover. Puppet Design by Bil Baird. Mask Design by James Cochrane. Lighting Design by Feder. Directed by Orson Welles. Maxine Elliott's Theatre: 8 Jan 1937- Apr 1937 (closing date unknown/128 performances). Cast: Wallace Acton (as "Ralph"), Cora Burlar (as "Envy"), Jack Carter (as "Mephistopheles"), Blanche Collins (as "Evil Angel"), George Duthie (as "Old Man"), Della Ford (as "Gluttony"), Jane Hale (as "Covetousness"), Natalie Harris (as "Good Angel"), J. Headley, Edward Hemmer, William Hitch, Paula Laurence (as "Spirit in the Shape of Helen of Troy"), Elizabeth Malone (as "Pride"), Harry McKee (as "Clown"), Lee Molnar (as "Lechery"), Edgerton Paul (as "Robin"), Myron Paulson (as "Cornelius"), Charles Peyton (as "The Pope"), Helena Rappaport, Nina Salama, Archie Savage (as "Baliol"), Bernard Savage (as "Valdes"), George Smithfield, Arthur Spencer, Orson Welles (as "Faustus"), Huntly Weston, Joseph Wooll, Clarence Yates. Produced by Federal Theatre Project 891.

(1937). Stage Play: Julius Caesar. Tragedy (revival). Written by William Shakespeare. Incidental music by Marc Blitzstein. Assistant Director: Hiram Sherman. Directed by Orson Welles. Mercury Theatre (moved to the National Theatre in March 1938 to close): 11 Nov 1937- Mar 1938 (closing date unknown/157 performances). Cast: William Alland (as "Marullus"), Evelyn Allen, Arthur Anderson, Muriel Brassler, Grover Burgess (as "Ligarius"), Francis Carpenter, Joseph Cotten, George Coulouris, George Duthie (as "Artemidorus"), Martin Gabel (as "Cassius"), Joseph Holland (as "Julius Caesar"), John Hoyt (as "Decius Brutus"; credited as John Hoysradt), Norman Lloyd, William Mowry, Ted Reid, Stefan Schnabel (as "Metellus Cimber"), Hiram Sherman, John A. Willard (as "Trebonius"). Replacement actors included: Edmond O'Brien (as "Marc Antony") [during National Theatre run in Mar 1938]. Produced by Orson Welles and John Houseman. Note: One of the definitive Shakespearian revivals of the 20th Century.

(1938) Stage: "The Cradle Will Rock" on Broadway. Musical/drama. Book by / directed by Marc Blitzstein. Windsor Theatre: 3 Jan 1938-Apr 1938 (closing date unknown/108 performances). Cast: John Adair (as "Harry Druggist"), Guido Alexander, Howard Bird, Marc Blitzstein, Billy Bodkins, Helen Carter, Robert Clark, Blanche Collins, Peggy Coudray, Howard Da Silva (as "Larry Foreman"), Alma Dixon, Abner Dorsey, George Fairchild, Dulce Mann, Robert Fransworth (as "Cop"), Edward Fuller, Will Geer (as "Mr. Mister"), Lillia Hallums, Maynard Holmes (as "Junior Mister"), Larry Lauria, Frank Marvel, Charles Niemeyer, LeRoi Operti (as "President Prexy"), Geoffrey Powers, Ralph Ramson, Marian Rudley, Lucille Schly, Jules Schmidt, E. Sidney, George Smithfield, Olive Stanton, Bert Weston. Produced by Sam H. Grisman and The Mercury Theatre [Orson Welles).

(1938). Stage Play: The Cradle Will Rock. Musical/drama. Book by Marc Blitzstein. Directed by Marc Blitzstein. Windsor Theatre: 3 Jan 1938- Apr 1938 (closing date unknown/108 performances). Cast: John Adair (as "Harry Druggist"), Guido Alexander, Howard Bird, Marc Blitzstein, Billy Bodkins, Helen Carter, Robert Clark, Blanche Collins, Peggy Coudray, Howard Da Silva (as "Larry Foreman"), Alma Dixon, Abner Dorsey, George Fairchild, Dulce Mann, Robert Fransworth (as "Cop"), Edward Fuller, Will Geer (as "Mr. Mister"), Lillia Hallums, Maynard Holmes (as "Junior Mister"), Larry Lauria, Frank Marvel, Charles Niemeyer, LeRoi Operti (as "President Prexy"), Geoffrey Powers, Ralph Ramson, Marian Rudley, Lucille Schly, Jules Schmidt, E. Sidney, George Smithfield, Olive Stanton, Bert Weston. Produced by Sam H. Grisman and The Mercury Theatre [Orson Welles].

(1938) Stage: Directed / appeared (as "St. Just") in / co-produced (w/John Houseman) "Danton's Death" on Broadway. Drama (revival). Music by Marc Blitzstein. Written by Geoffrey Dunlop. Based on the German of Georg Buchner. Scenic Design by Jan Tichacek. Mercury Theatre: 2 Nov 1938-Nov 1938 (closing date unknown/21 performances). Cast: William Alland (as "Servant to Danton"; final Broadway role), Ellen Andrews (as "Voice in the Street"), Richard Baer (as "Convention Attendant"), Fay Baker (as "Voice in the Street"), Edgar Barrier (as "Camille Desmoulins"), John Berry (as "Gaoler"), Joseph Cotten (as "Barrere"), Helen Coule (as "Voice in the Street"), George Duthie (as "1st Old Man" / "President of the Convention"; final Broadway role), Ross Elliott (as "Convention Attendant"), Morgan Farley (as "Heralut De Sechelles"), Ruth Ford (as "Rosalie"), Arlene Francis (as "Marion"), Martin Gabel (as "Danton"), Sparke Hastings (as "Member of the Convention"), Arthur Hoffe (as "Voice in the Street"), Guy Kingsley (as "Lacroix"), William Mowry (as "Member of the Convention"), Edgerton Paul (as "Servant to Danton"), Stanley Poss (as "Servant to Danton"), Stephen Roberts (as "Member of the Convention"), Erskine Sanford (as "Philppeau" / "2nd Old Man"), Sanford Siegel (as "Voice in the Street"), Vladimir Sokoloff (as "Robespierre"), Anna Stafford (as "Julie"), Fred Thompson (as "Voice in the Street"), Evelyn Wahl (as "Lucile"), Mary Wickes (as "Christine"), Richard Wilson (as "Legendre"), Eustace Wyatt (as "Fouquier").

(1938). Stage Play: Danton's Death. Drama (revival). Music by Marc Blitzstein. Written by Geoffrey Dunlop. Based on the German of Georg Buchner. Scenic Design by Jan Tichacek. Directed by Orson Welles. Mercury Theatre: 2 Nov 1938- Nov 1938 (closing date unknown/21 performances). Cast: William Alland (as "Servant to Danton"), Ellen Andrews (as "Voice in the Street"), Richard Baer (as "Convention Attendant"), Fay Baker (as "Voice in the Street"), Edgar Barrier (as "Camille Desmoulins"), John Berry (as "Gaoler"), Joseph Cotten (as "Barrere"), Helen Coule (as "Voice in the Street"), George Duthie (as "1st Old Man/President of the Convention"), Ross Elliott (as "Convention Attendant"), Morgan Farley (as "Heralut De Sechelles"), Ruth Ford (as "Rosalie"), Arlene Francis (as "Marion"), Martin Gabel (as "Danton"), Sparke Hastings (as "Member of the Convention"), Arthur Hoffe (as "Voice in the Street"), Guy Kingsley (as "Lacroix"), William Mowry (as "Member of the Convention"), Edgerton Paul (as "Servant to Danton"), Stanley Poss (as "Servant to Danton"), Stephen Roberts (as "Member of the Convention"), Erskine Sanford (as "Philppeau" / "2nd Old Man"), Sanford Siegel (as "Voice in the Street"), Vladimir Sokoloff (as "Robespierre"), Anna Stafford (as "Julie"), Fred Thompson (as "Voice in the Street"), Evelyn Wahl (as "Lucile"), Orson Welles (as "St. Just"), Mary Wickes (as "Christine"), Richard Wilson (as "Legendre"), Eustace Wyatt (as "Fouquier"). Produced by Orson Welles and John Houseman.

(1939). Stage Play: The Philadelphia Story. Comedy. Written by Philip Barry. Scenic Design by Robert Edmond Jones. Directed by Robert B. Sinclair. Shubert Theatre: 28 Mar 1939- 30 Mar 1940 (417 performances). Cast: Vera Allen, Lorraine Bate, Shirley Booth (as "Elizabeth Imbrie"), Owen Coll (as "Thomas"), Joseph Cotten (as "C.K. Dexter Haven"; appeared courtesy of The Mercury Theatre/Orson Welles), Frank Fenton (as "George Kittredge"), Philip Foster, Van Heflin, Katharine Hepburn (as "Tracy Samantha Lord"), Nicholas Joy (as "Seth Lord"), Lenore Lonergan, Hayden Rorke (as "Mac"), Forrest Orr (as "William Tracy" / "Uncle Willy"), Myrtle Tannehill (as "May"), Dan Tobin. Produced by The Theatre Guild. Note: Filmed by MGM as The Philadelphia Story (1940).

(1942). Stage Play: Native Son. Drama (revival). Written by Paul Green and Richard Wright. Based on the novel by Richard Wright. Directed by Orson Welles. Majestic Theatre: 23 Oct 1942- 2 Jan 1943 (84 performances). Produced by The Brandts. Note: Filmed as Native Son (1951), Native Son (1986).

(1946). Stage Play: Around the World. Musical. Music by Cole Porter. Lyrics by Cole Porter. Incidental score by Cole Porter. Book adapted by Orson Welles. Based on the novel by Jules Verne. Musical Director: Harry S. Levant. Music orchestrated by Russell Bennett and Ted Royal. Adelphi Theatre: 31 May 1946- 3 Aug 1946 (75 performances). Cast: Victoria Cordova (as "Lola, the proprietress of a Café"), Mary Healy (as "Mrs. Aouda, an Indian Princess"), Arthur Margetson (as "Mr. Phileas Fogg"), Julie Warren (as "Molly Muggins, an Irish Nursemaid"), Lucas Aco (as "Dancing Fella/Fakir/Sinister Chinese/Assistant, Circus Artist/Jim, a railroad conductor of the Central Pacific R.R./Dancer"), Nathan Baker (as "London Bobbie/Sinister Chinese/Father, Clown/Dancer"), Dorothy Bird (as "Meerahlah, a dancer/Mexican Dancer"), Kenneth Bonjukian (as "Singer"), Mary Broussard (as "Aerialist, Circus Artist/Dancer"), Bruce Cartwright (as "Servingman/Firemen, Clown/Mexican Dancer/Dancer"), Jack Cassidy (as "Policeman, Clown/Singer"), Jackie Cezanne (as "Lee Toy/Dancer"), Cliff Chapman (as "Bride, Clown"), Arthur Cohen (as "High Priest/Minister, Clown/Singer"), Adelaide Corsi (as "Rolling Globe Lady, Circus Artist"), Daniel De Paolo (as "Dragon, Clown/Singer"), Eddy Di Genova (as "Snake Charmer/Monkey Man, Clown/Bartender/Singer"), Brainerd Duffield (as "Bank Robber/Mr. Benajmin Cruett-Spew/Second Arab Spy/Mr. Oka Saka, Proprietor of the Oka Saka Circus/Sol, a station master in San Francisco"), Florence Gault (as "Singer"), Ray Goody (as "The Slide for Life, Circus Artist"), Natalye Greene (as "Singer"), Eleanore Gregory (as "Dancer"), Arline Hanna (as "Singer"), Billy Howell (as "Lord Upditch/Station Attendant/Sinister Chinese/Assistant, Circus Artist/Sam, a stagecoach driver/Other Medicine Man/Dancer"), Ishikawa (as "Hand Balancer, Circus Artist"), Spencer James (as "Sikh/Jake, a railroad engineer"), Philip King (as "Sinister Chinese/Dancer"), Marion Kohler (as "Singer"), Larry Laurence (as "Passepartout, a Yankee manservant to Fogg/Groom, Clown"), Patricia Leith (as "Aerialist, Circus Artist/Dancer"), Allan Lowell (as "Kimona Man, Clown/Jail Guard/Singer"), Miss Lu (as "Contortionist, Circus Artist"), Gregory McDougall (as "Another Servingman/Assistant, Circus Artist/Dancer"), Tony Montell (as "Roustabout, Circus Artist/Singer"), Virginia Morris (as "Aerialist, Circus Artist/Dancer"), Lee Morrison (as "Daughter of Joy/Dancer"), Nancy Newton (as "Daughter of Joy/Dancer"), Miriam Pandor (as "Dancer"), Rose Marie Patane (as "Singer"), Bernard Pisarski (as "Child, Clown"), Jack Pitchon (as "London Bobbie/Roustabout, Circus Artist/Singer"), Virginia Sands (as "Dancer"), Genevieve Sauris (as "Lady/Singer"), Bernard Savage (as "Sir Charles Mandiboy/British Consul, in Suez"), Victor Savidge (as "Snake Charmer/Singer"), Stefan Schnabel (as "Avery Jevity, the First Earl of Cravenaw/Arab Spy/Mother, Clown/Medicine Man, of the Ojibiway"), Gina Siena (as "Singer"), Guy Spaull (as "Police Inspector/Mr. Ralph Runcible/Maurice Goodpile, Conductor on the Great Indian Peninsula R.R."), George Spelvin (as "Other Medicine Man"), Myron Speth (as "London Bobbie/Dancing Fella/Assistant, Circus Artist/Dancer"), Drucilla Strain (as "Singer"), The Three Kanasawa (as "Foot Jugglers, Circus Artists"), Stanley Turner (as "Snake Charmer/Attendant, Clown/Singer"), Lee Vincent (as "Aerialist, Circus Artist/Dancer"), Orson Welles (as "Dick Fix/Copper's Knark"), Gordon West (as "London Bobbie/Firemen, Clown/Dancer"). Produced by Orson Welles.

(1956). Stage Play: King Lear. Tragedy (revival). Written by William Shakespeare. Musical score by Marc Blitzstein. Associate Director: Emerson Crocker. Directed by Orson Welles. City Center: 12 Jan 1956- 29 Jan 1956 (21 performances). Cast: Orson Welles (as "King Lear of Britain"), Art Alisi (as "Knight/Officer"), David Anthony (as "Knight/Officer"), Jack Aronson (as "Tenant to Gloucester/Gentleman"), Julian Barry (as "Knight/Officer"), Robert Blackburn (as "King of France"), Sorrell Booke (as "Duke of Albany"), Robert Burr (as "Servant to Cornwall/Captain"), Francis Carpenter (as "Oswald, Goneril's Steward"), Tom Clancy (as "Curan"), John Colicos (as "Edmund, Gloucester's Bastard Son"), Thayer David (as "Duke of Cornwall"), Roy Dean (as "Earl of Kent"), Richard Edelman (as "Knight/Officer"), Alvin Epstein (as "Fool"), Geraldine Fitzgerald (as "Goneril, Lear's Daughter"), Robert Fletcher (as "Edgar, Gloucester's Son"), Richard Hill (as "Knight/Officer"), Viveca Lindfors (as "Cordelia,Lear's Daughter"), Walter Mathews (as "Duke of Burgundy/Doctor"), Kenneth Mays (as "Knight/Officer"), Thomas Newman (as "Knight/Officer"), Lou Perri (as "Knight/Officer"), James T. Pritchett (as "Knight/Officer"), Don Ratka (as "Knight/Officer"), Lester Rawlins (as "Earl of Gloucester"), Sylvia Short (as "Regan, Lear's Daughter"), Robert Weaver (as "Knight/Officer"), Michael Yuda (as "Knight/Officer"). Understudy: Anne Meacham. Produced by New York City Center Theatre Company (Jean Dalrymple: Director). Produced by arrangement with Martin Gabel and Henry M. Margolis. Note: Welles broke his ankle in a preview performance and played the entire run of the Broadway engagement (21 performances) in a wheelchair.

(1962). Stage Play: Moby Dick. Drama. Written by Orson Welles [final Broadway credit]. Adapted from "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville. Incidental music by Harold Glick. Directed by Douglas Campbell. Ethel Barrymore Theatre: 28 Nov 1962- 8 Dec 1962 (13 performances). Cast: Judith Doty (as "Young Actress' Understudy"), Bill Fletcher (as "Member of the Company, later Elijah"), Bruno Gerussi (as "Young Actor, later Ishmael"), Max Helpmann (as "Cynical Actor, later Flask"), John Horton (as "Member of the Company, later The Mastheader and Voice of the Bachelor"), Frances Hyland (as "Young Actress, later Pip"), Lex Monson (as "Member of the Company, later Queequeg"), William Needles (as "Stage Manager, later Capt. Peleg and Voice of The Rachel"), Roy Poole (as "Serious Actor, later Starbuck"), Melvin Scott (as "Member of the Company, later Daggoo"), Rod Steiger (as "Actor-Manager, later Father Mapple and Captain Ahab"), David Thomas (as "An Old "Pro," later the Carpenter"), Hugh Webster (as "Actor with Newspaper, later Stubb"), Louis Zorich (as "Middle-aged Actor, later Tashtego"). Understudies: Judith Doty (as "Young Actress, later Pip"), Bill Fletcher (as "Serious Actor, later Starbuck"), John Horton (as "Young Actor, later Ishmael"), Lex Monson (as "Stage Manager"), Rex Partington (as "Member of the Company, later Daggoo/Middle-aged Actor, later Tashtego"), Roy Poole (as "Actor-Manager"), David Thomas (as "Actor with Newspaper, later Stubb") and Louis Zorich (as "An Old "Pro," later the Carpenter/Cynical Actor, later Flask). Produced by Jerry Adler and Samuel Liff.

(1938). Stage Play: The Shoemakers' Holiday (Revival). Written by Thomas Dekker. Incidental music by Lehman Engel. Directed by Orson Welles. Mercury Theatre (moved to The National Theatre (circa 1 Feb 1938- close): 1 Jan 1938- unknown (69 performances/played in repertory with Julius Caesar). Cast: William Alland (as "Serving Man"), Arthur Anderson (as "A Boy"), Charles Baker (as "Attendant/Soldier"), Edith Barrett (as "Sybil, Rose's Maid"), John Berry (as "Soldier"), Francis Carpenter (as "Dodger"), Joseph Cotten (as "Rowland Lacy"), George Coulouris (as "The King"), George Duthie (as "Master Scott"), Ruth Ford (as "Jane, wife of Ralph"), Alice Frost (as "Rose, daughter of Sir Roger"), William Herz (as "Shoemaker"), William Howell (as "Attendant"), John Hoyt [credited as John Hoysradt] (as "Sir Roger Oteley"), Whitford Kane (as "Simon Eyre, the Shoemaker"), George Lloyd (as "Soldier'), Norman Lloyd' (as "Roger, Eyre's Journeyman, commonly called Hodge"), William Mowry (as "Askew"), James O'Rear (as "Shoemaker"), Tileston Perry (as "Soldier"), Vincent Price (as "Master Hammon"), Elliott Reid (as "Ralph, Eyre's Journeyman"), Frederick Ross (as "Soldier"), Stefan Schnabel (as "A Dutch Skipper"), Hiram Sherman (as "Firk, Eyre's Journeyman"), Frederick Thompson (as "Soldier"), Frederic Tozere (as "Sir Hugh Lacy, Earl of Lincoln"), Marian Warring-Manley (as "Margery, Wife of Simon Eyre"), Frank Westbrook (as "Shoemaker"), John A. Willard (as "Master Warner"), Richard Wilson (as "Shoemaker"). Replacement actor: Ross Elliott (as "Soldier"). Produced by Orson Welles and John Houseman.

(19??) Radio: Introduced the series "The Black Museum" and portrayed Prof. Moriarty in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes". Both series were produced by Harry Alan Towers, the man responsible for "The Lives of Harry Lime".

(10/30/38) Radio: His "The Mercury Theatre on the Air" broadcast H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds". The newscast format of the script was so realistic that many listener who were not aware that it was a drama believed that Martians were actually invading the Earth, and panic ensued in several areas of the country.

(1943) Radio: Filled in for Jack Benny for several weeks in the spring, when Benny was too ill to appear on his own comedy show.

(1942-44) Radio: Appeared in a number of episodes of the "Suspense" anthology series. One of those episodes, an adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "Lost Special," was itself believed to be lost until an Armed Forces Radio version turned up on the internet in 2008.

(1979) Narrator: Trailer and TV commercials for Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)

(1947) Album: He adapted, directed and narrated a version of Oscar Wilde's story "The Happy Prince", for Decca Records. Bing Crosby spoke the Prince's lines (and got first billing) and Mercury Theatre actress Lurene Tuttle played the Swallow. The music was written by Welles' frequent collaborator Bernard Herrmann and conducted by Victor Young. The album, first issued on a 78 RPM two-record set, has been released on CD in its entirety on the compact disc "A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Tales". Note: The album was produced in 1946, but not released until 1947.

(1951) Stage: Appeared (as "Othello") in William Shakespeare's "Othello," at the St. James' Theatre in London, England with Gudrun Ure, Peter Finch, Maxine Audley and Giles Cooper in the cast.

(19??) Radio: Played "Hamlet" for the first and only time in his own two-part radio adaptation of William Shakespeare's play, performed as part of the experimental theater radio program "Columbia Workshop". The program was broadcast on CBS. The two parts of the program, which reduced the four-hour play to one hour, were broadcast two months apart. It had been Welles' intention to broadcast only the first two acts, but public acclaim and demand ensured that Acts IV and V were also broadcast. Sadly enough, Act III was not broadcast, and with its omission went the famous "To be or not to be" speech, probably the only time that "Hamlet" has been performed on radio without that speech. Because the two segments were broadcast two months apart, several cast members changed from one broadcast to the next; for instance, Alexander Scourby, who would play King Claudius onstage, played him in Acts I and II, but not in the rest of the play; another actor substituted for him afterwards. This adaptation of "Hamlet" still survives and can be heard on the internet.

(12/15/41) Radio: Appeared (as himself) on the show "We Hold These Truths".

(1998) Stage: Adapted William Shakespeare's play, "Chimes at Midnight," performed in a Chichester Festival Production at the Chichester Festival Theatre in Chichester, West Sussex, England, with Simon Callow, Keith Baxter, Sarah Badel, Tam Williams, Rowland Davies, Timothy Bateson, Rebecca Egan, John Warner, and David Weston in the cast. Patrick Garland was director.

(1960) Stage: Directed Eugène Ionesco's play, "Rhinoceros," in an English Stage Company production at the Royal Court Theatre in London, England, with Laurence Olivier, Joan Plowright, Alan Webb, Michael Bates, Miles Malleson and Peter Sallis in the cast.

(1960) Stage: Directed Eugène Ionesco's play, "Rhinoceros," in an English Stage Company production at the Strand Theatre in London, England, with Laurence Olivier, Maggie Smith, Michael Gough, Michael Bates, Miles Malleson and Peter Sallis in the cast.

(1951) Radio: Reprised the role of Harry Lime, from the film The Third Man (1949), in the drama "The Lives of Harry Lime," which ran for over 50 episodes.

(10/30/38) Radio: Leading director, at the Mercury Theatre on-the-air program, as he and other staff members extremely heavily dramatized, as they created science-fiction program, "War of the Worlds", based on H.G. Wells' novel. Their setting up events of imaginary Martians landing on Earth (locations, at the time, were contemporary). The first Martian "sighting and invasion" was at Grover's Mill, New Jersey. The show started out with a "normal" comedy and musical radio program that was suddenly interrupted with "news" accounts of reports from Grover's Mill of Martian landings and the aliens ravaging the countryside, complete with "witness" accounts of the death and destruction being wrought. The "program" was continually interrupted with news bulletins featuring accounts of large numbers of Martian spaceships landing and even more hysterical witness accounts of devastation caused by the invaders. The broadcast was so realistic that it caused a nationwide panic among listeners, with hysterical residents of the areas supposedly near the fictional town of Grover's Mill fleeing in droves. Welles publicly and personally apologized the next day for what he and staff members meant as a practical joke, one day in advance of Halloween. Despite his apology, there were numerous lawsuits filed against Welles and the station headquarters of Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) radio. All the lawsuits were eventually dismissed This incident is also listed in textbooks as an example of what happens when mass hysteria grips a population.

(1937). Stage [off Broadway]: Directed Marc Blitzstein's "The Cradle Will Rock". NOTE: The federal government tried to prevent the opera, which was extremely friendly to organized labor, from opening, so Welles moved the company to a neighboring theater, the actors sat with the audience and performed it from their aisle seats due to an Actors Equity regulation. The play would later run successfully at The Windsor Theatre (108 performances), opening 3 Jan 1938 without Welles' involvement.

(1961) Stage: Wrote / directed "Moby Dick--Rehearsed", London, England. Also in cast: Kenneth Williams, Joan Plowright (as "Little Pip") and Patrick McGoohan (as "Starbuck").

(1934) Radio: Wrote / appeared in "School of the Air".

(1987) Album: Narrated "Tales of Mystery and Imagination: Edgar Allan Poe" by The Alan Parsons Project (Polygram Records).

(1984) Album: Narrated the song "Dark Avenger" for Man o' War's album "Battle Hymns".

(1984) Single: Featured on the single "I Know What It's Like to Be Young" (Crescendo Records).

(1982) Wrote introduction to "The Films of Burt Reynolds" by Nancy Streebeck.

(1962) Wrote the preface to "Memories of a Bullfighter" by 'Conchita Cintron'.

(1956) Wrote introduction to "The Year's Grestest Science-Fiction and Fantasy" by Judith Merrill.

(3/56) Welles begins a four-week engagement at the Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, where he does a 25-minute act featuring magic tricks and recitations from various works of William Shakespeare. His engagement was held over for an additional two weeks.

(1956) Unsold pilot: Produced / directed / wrote / narrated a pilot called "Camille, the Naked Lady and the Musketeers", based on the life of Alexandre Dumas père.

(1982) TV commercial: WABC (New York) Talk Radio

(1981) TV commercial: Preview Pay-TV

(6/5/44) Radio: Appeared (as "Edward Rochester") in a "Lux Radio Theater" production of "Jane Eyre".

(2/13/60) Stage: Adapted / appeared (as "Falstaff") in "Chimes at Midnight", Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland. Moved to the Gaiety Theatre on Feb. 20.

(1954) Unsold pilot: Wrote / directed / appeared in a pilot for a series to be called "Camille, the Naked Lady and the Musketeers".

(11/3/31) Stage: Appeared (as "Ralph Bentley") in "The Dead Ride Fast", Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(11/20/31) Stage: Appeared (as "Marshal Francois Bazaine" / "Mexican colonel") in "The Archduke". Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(12/26/31) Stage: Appeared (as "Chosroes, King of Persia") in "Mogu of the Desert" by Padraic Colum. Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(1/12/32) Stage: Appeared (as "Baron Lamberto") in "Death Takes a Holiday" by Alberto Casella and Walter Ferris. Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(2/2/32) Stage: Appeared (as "Fortunbras" / "The Ghost") in "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare. Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(10/13/31) Stage: Appeared (as "Duke Karl Alexander") in "Jew Suss' by Leon Feuchtwanger', Dublin Gate Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(3/32) Stage: Appeared (as "Lord Porteus") in "Circle" by 'W. Somerset Maugham' (qvA). Abbey Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Chinese Bungalow" by Matheson Lang. Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Lady from the Sea" by Henrik Ibsen. Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Hay Fever" by Noel Coward, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Wrote / appeared in "Alice in Wonderland U.S.A.", based on Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland". Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Mr. Wu" by Maurice Vernon and Harold Owen. Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Only Way", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Designed scenery for a production of "The Three Sisters" by Anton Chekhov. Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in Peer Gynt by Henrik Ibsen. Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Father" by August Strindberg, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Rivals", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Emperor Jones" by Eugene O'Neill, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "La Locandiera", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in Ferenc Molnar's "The Play's the Thing", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Man and Superman" by George Bernard Shaw, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Dr. Knock", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Grumpy", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Marropoul's Secret", Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "The Dover Road" by A.A. Milne, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Volpone" by Ben Jonson, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared (as "David Kentley") in "Rope" by Patrick Hamilton. Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appearedin "Richard III" by William Shakespeare, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "Timon of Athens" by William Shakespeare, Dublin, Ireland.

(1932) Stage: Appeared in "King John" by William Shakespeare, Dublin, Ireland.

(11/29/33) Stage: Appeared (as "Octavious Moulton Barrett") in "The Barretts of Wimpole Street" by Rudolph Besier. Directed by Guthrie McClintic. New York City.

(1933) Stage: Appeared (as "Marchbanks") in US tour of "Candida" by George Bernard Shaw.

(10/29/38) Radio: Appeared in a broadcast of "The Magnificent Ambersons".

(1959) Album: Appeared on the spoken-word album "A Lincoln Treasury" (Decca Records).

(2/20/60) Stage: Appeared in "An Evening with Orson Welles", Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, Ireland.

(4/28/60) Stage: Costume Designer for / Directed "Rhinoceros" by Eugène Ionesco, Royal Court Theatre, London, England.

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated "The Happy Prince".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Evelyn Waugh's "A Handful of Dust".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated "A.V. Laider".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Ludwig Bemelmans' "A Grape for Mr. Cape".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Truman Capote's "Miriam".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated John Cheever's "The National Pastime".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated John Collier's "The Chaser".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Karen Blixen's "The Old Chevalier".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Karen Blixen's "The Heroine".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Bret Harte's "The Outcasts of Poker Flat".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Wakefield".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Ernest Hemingway's "Ten Indians".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Ernest Hemingway's "In Another Country".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Rudyard Kiplings "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated John O'Hara's "Malibu from the Sky".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated "Sredni Vashtar".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated William Saroyan's "The Summer of the Beautiful White Horses".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Irwin Shaw's "The Girls in Their Summer Dresses".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated Robert Louis Stevenson's "Letter to the Reverend Doctor Hyde".

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated his own "My Father Wore Black Spats">

(1985) Audio book (Japan only): Narrated H.G. Wells' "The Red Room".

(1934) Book: "Everybody's Shakespeare", a series of textbooks by Welles and Roger Hill (Woodstock, NY: Todd Press.

(1979) TV commercial: Paul Masson wine.

(19??) Narrator: Introduction for restored version of The General (1926).

(1984) Narrator: trailer for Revenge of the Nerds (1984).

(1983) TV commercials: Narrated TV spots for Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (1983).

(5/18/44, 5/25/44) Radio: Played the part of Dr. Corey in "Donovan's Brain" on the first two-part broadcast ever produced on radio's "Suspense". Almost 40 years later, the two episodes were released on an LP by Radiola Records of Sandy Hook, Connecticut, and the album won a historical/spoken word Grammy.

(1973) Narrator on "The Cave", a ten-minute short that was an animated dramatization of Plato's "Republic", Book VII.

(1970) Album: He was the narrator on the comedy album "The Begatting of the President", an album which credited three unknown writers, but whose satirical style resembled something that only Welles could have come up with.

(19??) Radio: Introduced the series "The Black Museum" and portrayed Prof. Moriarty in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes". Both series were produced by Harry Alan Towers, the man responsible for "The Lives of Harry Lime".


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