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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1992 | 1991

1-20 of 109 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Michael Moore, Kim Longinotto, Dionne Walker projects set for Doc/Fest market

9 hours ago | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Documentary festival’s MeetMarket will host 65 projects at 2017 edition.

A Michael Moore exec-produced Orson Welles doc and Dan Gordon’s Cuban sports film are among projects to be pitched at Sheffield Doc/Fest’s MeetMarket.

The festival’s flagship pitch event, which takes place on 12-13 June, will host 65 projects selected from more than 500 submissions.

The Mark Cousins-directed Orson Welles: A Portrait Of The Artist will be seeking sales and distribution deals at the market, alongside Kim Longinotto’s Shooting The Mafia, a film about a female photographer’s war against the Mafia.

Hillsborough director Dan Gordon will return to pitch Running For The Revolution with co-producer Julie Goldman, and Bafta-nominated The Hard Stop producer Dionne Walker is to present psychological doc Invisible Woman 2.0, about a couple working the streets of Paris.

Elsewhere, the Laura Poitras exec-produced The Rashomon Effect, directed by Lyric R. Cabral, will look at the differing perspectives of eyewitnesses recalling the shooting »

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Wes Anderson’s Style: Watch 10 Iconic Movies That Influenced Him

26 April 2017 2:23 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here.

Wes Anderson has one of the most original voices of any filmmaker working today, but his movies are full of clues as to which directors have influenced him the most. From Orson Welles to François Truffaut to Federico Fellini, some of the most iconic filmmakers in the history of cinema have had a hand in inspiring Anderson’s distinctive style. Here are 10 films that had a lasting impact on the indie auteur.

The Magnificent Ambersons” (1942)

Orson Welles’ period drama about a wealthy family that loses its entire fortune at the turn of the 20th century »

- Graham Winfrey

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Rushes. Jonathan Demme, Cannes Jury, Reactionary French Comedy, Academy Museum

26 April 2017 12:04 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSJonathan Demme with Anthony Hopkins on the set of The Silence of the LambsWe are very saddened to learn that the American director Jonathan Demme has died at 73. Demme won a Best Director Academy Award for The Silence of the Lambs, but that hardly summarizes or rewards the remarkable extent of his beautiful filmmaking. Just last year he released one of his very best works, the concert film Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids. Below is his 1985 music video for New Order's "The Perfect Kiss":Last year's jury for the Cannes Film Festival was lambasted as misguided after awarding the Palme d'Or not to Maren Ade's Toni Erdmann but to Ken Loach's I, Blake. The 2017 jury, headed by Pedro Almodóvar, has been announced and seems an attempt to make up for last year's kerfuffle: directors Maren Ade, Agnès Jaoui, »

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Ophélia

25 April 2017 1:19 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

New Wave director Claude Chabrol goes off in an odd direction with this Francophone adaptation of Hamlet. Convinced that his father was murdered, the heir to an estate behaves like a madman as he sets out to unmask the killers. The ‘castle’ is a country manse guarded by thugs as a precaution against the signeur’s striking union workers. Special added attraction: the stars to see are Alida Valli and Juliette Mayniel of Eyes without a Face.

Ophélia

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1963 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 104 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95

Starring: Alida Valli, Juliette Mayniel, Claude Cerval, André Jocelyn, Robert Burnier, Jean-Louis Maury, Sacha Briquet, Liliane Dreyfus (David), Pierre Vernier.

Cinematography: Jacques Rabier, Jean Rabier

Film Editor: Jacques Gaillard

Original Music: Pierre Jansen

Written by Claude Chabrol, Paul Gégauff, Martial Matthieu from a play by William Shakespeare

Produced and Directed by Claude Chabrol

 

I suppose »

- Glenn Erickson

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Interview with Kurando Mitsutake: I believe the current trend for the market is nostalgic marketing

25 April 2017 3:20 AM, PDT | AsianMoviePulse | See recent AsianMoviePulse news »

Kurando Mitsutake is originally from Tokyo, Japan. He graduated with an Mfa from California Institute of the Arts and is a member of the Directors Guild of Japan and Screen Actors Guild. Mitsutake made his feature film directorial debut with “Monsters Don’t Get to Cry” in 2004. In 2008, he produced, wrote, and directed his second feature film, “Samurai Avenger: The Blind Wolf”. The film screened at more than ten film festivals around the world and won multiple awards. “Samurai Avenger: The Blind Wolf” was distributed in over 15 countries including the United States. “Gun Woman” was Mitsutake’s third feature film and it was awarded the Special Jury Prize at the 24th Yubari International Fantastic Film Festival in Japan. It opened theatrically in Japan nationwide in July of 2014 and was distributed in the Us in 2015. His latest film is called “Karate Kill” and will will be available from 8 Films in May. »

- Panos Kotzathanasis

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‘Ghostwatch’ Scared So Many People That BBC Only Aired It Once — 25 Years Later, You Can Finally Watch It Again

21 April 2017 5:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

You don’t have to believe in ghosts to believe in “Ghostwatch.” BBC aired the infamous, ahead-of-its-time mockumentary on Halloween night, 1992, creating such an uproar with the program that it never made the airwaves again. Twenty-five years later, “Ghostwatch” can finally be seen again: As it did with “The Devils,” Ken Russell’s oft-censored, long-unavailable act of feature-length blasphemy, horror streaming platform Shudder has made the film available to stream.

Presented by the Beeb as a totally above-board enterprise, the 90-minute special purports to seek (and perhaps even offer) irrefutable proof that ghosts do in fact exist. The organizers do so by spending the night in a house that’s said to be haunted, with an entire team both in the studio and out in the field live; the coverage resembles that of a high-profile footie match. Well-known presenters play themselves in the production, which only makes it more understandable »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Ghostwatch’ Scared So Many People That BBC Only Aired It Once — 25 Years Later, You Can Finally Watch It Again

21 April 2017 5:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

You don’t have to believe in ghosts to believe in “Ghostwatch.” BBC aired the infamous, ahead-of-its-time mockumentary on Halloween night, 1992, creating such an uproar with the program that it never made the airwaves again. Twenty-five years later, “Ghostwatch” can finally be seen again: As it did with “The Devils,” Ken Russell’s oft-censored, long-unavailable act of feature-length blasphemy, horror streaming platform Shudder has made the film available to stream.

Presented by the Beeb as a totally above-board enterprise, the 90-minute special purports to seek (and perhaps even offer) irrefutable proof that ghosts do in fact exist. The organizers do so by spending the night in a house that’s said to be haunted, with an entire team both in the studio and out in the field live; the coverage resembles that of a high-profile footie match. Well-known presenters play themselves in the production, which only makes it more understandable »

- Michael Nordine

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Stranger Than Fiction: The Truthiness of ‘Fargo’

20 April 2017 2:51 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

“You don’t have to have a true story to make a true story movie.”

Noah Hawley’s acclaimed midwestern crime anthology Fargo returns to FX this week, along with my enthusiasm for saying oh yah and you betcha to anyone with the gall to speak to me when I would rather be watching Fargo. In my defence there are not one, but two, gloriously bad Ewan McGregor wigs. Truly, Hawley is doing the Lord’s work. Season three is set in the not too distant past of 2010, and follows the tried-and-true template of a ridiculously stacked ensemble of endearing (and woefully misguided) ne’er do wells gradually bungling their way into a shit show of their own design. As with each of the previous installments, least of all the Coen Brothers’ original 1996 film, the opening of this week’s episode features the following superimposed text:

This is a true story. The »

- Meg Shields

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Newswire: Infamous BBC Halloween stunt Ghostwatch manifests on Shudder

18 April 2017 11:18 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Next to Orson Welles’ 1938 radio play of The War Of The Worlds, The BBC’s presentation of Ghostwatch is probably one of the best-known media-induced panics in broadcasting history. (And possibly more effective, as historians have recently concluded that the bedlam surrounding Welles’ broadcast was exaggerated by contemporary newspapers eager to discredit their radio-news rivals.) On Halloween night of 1992, the BBC aired Ghostwatch, a 90-minute faux-investigative report purporting to show evidence of real paranormal activity in a London house featuring real news and kids’ show personalities. The whole thing was a stunt dreamed up by screenwriter Stephen Volk, but the people of Britain didn’t know that. Thinking they were seeing a real ghost really taking over the TV airwaves, people freaked the fuck out, leading to national panic, soiled underpants, and, more tragically, a suicide connected to the incident.

And Ghostwatch is remarkably terrifying, not least because ...

»

- Katie Rife

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Take A Grim Glimpse Into The Future In New Batch Of Images From The Flash

17 April 2017 5:37 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

See Full Gallery Here

The CW has released the first official images from the next episode of The Flash today and they feature an intriguing glimpse of the future. In this episode, the Scarlet Speedster will travel forward in time in a bid to find out the identity of self-proclaimed “Speed God” Savitar.

Whether or not he’ll succeed in that mission remains to be seen, but Barry Allen will come face to face with his future self and a variety of other characters. Those will seemingly include Mirror Master and Top, two villains also highlighted in the gallery of The Flash images above.

For more details on what to expect from “The Once and Future Flash,” here’s the official synopsis from the network:

Barry (Grant Gustin) travels to the future to find out Savitar’s still unknown identity in the hopes of saving Iris (Candice Patton). Upon his »

- Josh Wilding

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Chamber Of Horrors / A Game Of Death

17 April 2017 3:40 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Chamber of Horrors 

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber

1940 / B&W / 1:33 / Street Date March 21, 2017

Starring: Lilli Palmer, Leslie Banks.

Cinematography: Alex Bryce, Ernest Palmer

Film Editor: Ted Richards

Written by Gilbert Gunn, Norman Lee

Produced by John Argyle

Directed by Norman Lee

 

Near the turn of the century a struggling war correspondent named Edgar Wallace began churning out detective stories for British monthlies like Detective Story Magazine to help make the rent. Creative to a fault, his preposterously prolific output (exacerbated by ongoing gambling debts) soon earned him a legion of fans along with a pointedly ambiguous sobriquet, “The Man Who Wrote Too Much.”

A reader new to Wallace’s work could be excused for thinking the busy writer was making it up as he went along… because that’s pretty much what he did. He dictated his narratives, unedited, into a dictaphone for transcription by his secretary where they would then »

- Charlie Largent

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The 25 most iconic movie entrances

16 April 2017 12:34 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Robert Keeling Apr 25, 2017

Saluting the movie characters who make an impression, the minute they appear on the screen...

One thing that unites all of cinema’s most iconic characters is that they were able to make a memorable first impression. Whether it’s bursting onto the scene in a flurry of noise or slowly skulking their way into shot, there’s a fine art to ensuring a character makes an instant impact on screen. An iconic entrance is not just about a momentary impact however, it can also emphasise a character’s importance and help to cement their influence over the rest of the movie. 

See related  Westworld episode 10 review: The Bicameral Mind Westworld episode 9 review: The Well-Tempered Clavier

There are any number of contributory factors that can be blended together in order to make an entrance truly memorable. These include the accompanying music, the choice of camera shot, the »

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Touch of Evil

13 April 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

When top-billed Charlton Heston pushed for co-star Orson Welles to direct this late noir, nobody imagined it would emerge as one of the key works in the Welles canon despite being recut and partially reshot by Universal. His last Hollywood studio venture stacks up as probably Welles’ most popular picture  although in 1958 it was dumped into theaters as a second feature. Here’s F.X. Feeney with a great breakdown of Welles’ technique in Touch of Evil. And while we’re on the subject of Orson, here’s “The Most Complete Investigation into the Making of Citizen Kane“.

»

- TFH Team

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Werner Herzog Says Independent Film Is a ‘Myth,’ and America Is Stronger Than Trump

13 April 2017 10:26 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Werner Herzog doesn’t buy into the concept of independent film. The 74-year-old filmmaker explained to a packed audience in Brooklyn on Wednesday night that the only films he considers to be independent are home videos that people shoot at holidays, reunions, and other family functions.

Read More: Attention, Filmmakers: Here’s Your Chance to Go to Cuba to Make a Movie with Werner Herzog

“I don’t believe that independent cinema exists. It’s a myth,” Herzog said. “Cinema is always dependent on distribution systems, money, and technology. I try to be self-reliant, and there’s a big difference.”

Herzog sat for a two-hour talk moderated by film and media curator Sally Berger at the Pratt Institute’s School of Art, where he will spend the entire day Thursday watching student films and participating in filmmaking workshops.

The conversation took place two days before his latest film, “Queen of the Desert, »

- Graham Winfrey

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Rushes. Michael Ballhaus, Kathryn Bigelow's "Detroit," Tony Scott Adapts Henry James

12 April 2017 10:19 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSMichael Ballhaus (second from right) on the set of Martin Scorsese's The DepartedMichael Ballhaus, the great German cinematographer whose innovative work connects Rainer Werner Fassbinder to Martin Scorsese, has died at the age of 81.Goodness, could it be true, The Lost City of Z director James Gray and Brad Pitt finally teaming up? And for a sci-fi? Indeed: the film, titled Ad Astra, will be shooting this summer.Recommended VIEWINGKathryn Bigelow has been attached to several projects following the success and controversy of Zero Dark Thirty, and now we have a first look at her next feature, Detroit, set during 1967 riots in the city. It will be in cinemas this summer.The teaser trailer for Joachim Trier's Thelma, possibly headed to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. We spoke to Trier about his English language debut, Louder Than Bombs, »

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Review: Orson Welles' "Chimes At Midnight" 1966); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

8 April 2017 6:11 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Jeremy Carr

It’s easy to see why Orson WellesChimes at Midnight is generally regarded as his finest post-Touch of Evil achievement. This Shakespearean mélange is a dazzling showcase for Welles’ ingenuity, his evident appreciation for the film’s literary foundation, and his relentless aptitude for stylistic inventiveness. However, its haphazard production and its rocky release comprise a backstory as complicated as the movie’s multi-source construction (the script, based on the lengthy play “Five Kings,” written and first performed by Welles in the 1930s, samples scenes and dialogue from at least five of Shakespeare’s works, primarily “Henry IV,” parts one and two, “Richard II,” “Henry V,” and “The Merry Wives of Windsor”). Plagued by what were at this point familiar budgetary constraints, Welles shot Chimes at Midnight over the course of about seven months in Spain, with a break when the financial well went dry. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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San Francisco Film Festival: William Randolph Hearst III Discusses 'Citizen Kane'

7 April 2017 4:17 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

What’s the real meaning of “Rosebud,” the dying word that Orson Welles speaks in his performance as newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane in his classic film Citizen Kane, which was, in turn, inspired by the life of William Randolph Hearst?

Most viewers leave the movie convinced that Rosebud is Kane’s childhood sled, which he was playing with when he was taken away from his mother.

Welles himself, in a 1941 statement, explained, “In his subconscious, it represented the simplicity, the comfort, above all the lack of responsibility in his home, and also it stood for his mother's love, which Kane »

- Gregg Kilday

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‘Citizen Kane’ Was Shunned By the Hearst Family, But Now One Heir Admits He Loves It — San Francisco Film Festival

7 April 2017 3:13 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Citizen Kane” has been hailed for generations as the greatest movie ever made, but the newspaper mogul who inspired Orson Welles’ iconic portrait of a reclusive, affluent entrepreneur who dies alone did everything he could to act as if it never happened. Throughout his life, William Randolph Hearst kept the movie out of Hearst newspapers and never discussed it publicly, a tendency that was picked up by his heirs in the years following his death.

That all changed on Thursday night at the 60th Sf International Film Festival, when Hearst’s grandson, William Randolph Hearst III, spoke for a half hour before a screening of the film. The biggest surprise? He’s a huge fan of the movie — and has a lot of ideas about it.

Discovering a Masterpiece

“Inevitably, someone wants to ask me what I think and I usually disappoint them by saying how much I love the movie, »

- Eric Kohn

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Trials and Tribulations: The Art of Adapting Kafka

7 April 2017 9:41 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Should all adaptations of classic works be faithful?

In an interview with the BBC’s Hew Wheldon, Orson Welles set out his philosophy concerning adaptation, more specifically, his willingness to interpret and alter source material:

Wheldon: Do you have any compunction about changing a masterpiece?Welles: Not at all, because film is quite a different medium. Film should not be a fully illustrated, all-talking, all-moving version of a printed work, but should be itself, a thing of itself. In that way it uses a novel in the same way a playwright might use a novel — as a jumping off point from which he will create a complete new work. So no, I have no compunction about changing a book. If you take a serious view of filmmaking, you have to consider that films are not an illustration or an interpretation of a work, but quite as worthwhile as the original.

The »

- Meg Shields

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San Francisco’s Master Plan to Keep Film Relevant In the 21st Century — Sf International Film Festival

5 April 2017 6:07 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In order to understand the evolution of the San Francisco Film Festival on the eve of its 60th anniversary, it helps to look at its name, because it’s no longer called that.

Now, it’s the Sf International Film Festival, which is produced not by the San Francisco Film Society because the major nonprofit is now known simply as “Sffilm.” It’s an appropriately modern moniker for an institution nestled in the fast-paced technology circuit of the Bay Area, and chic enough to match the region’s progressive scene.

But that’s not the only way way in which Sffilm, which launches its 14-day festival this week, continues to stay relevant. “We’re sitting here in the Bay Area surrounded by an enormous amount of wealth that wants to be invested in media that matters,” said Sffilm executive director Noah Cowan. “We can really focus on who we are as a nonprofit, »

- Eric Kohn

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1992 | 1991

1-20 of 109 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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