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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Reviews: Criterion's "Riot In Cell Block 11" (1954) And "The 400 Blows" (1959)

13 April 2014 9:38 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Blu-ray/DVD Review

Riot In Cell Block 11” (Don Siegel)

The 400 Blows” (Francois Truffaut)

(The Criterion Collection)

Two Gems From The 50s

By Raymond Benson

Two new releases from The Criterion Collection spotlight low-budget filmmaking in the 1950s—American and European—and couldn’t be more stylistically and thematically diverse. And yet, there is a personal stamp on the pictures that is very similar. Both films also tackle social problems with brutal frankness and feature anti-heroes as protagonists.

Riot in Cell Block 11 was produced by longtime Hollywood independent producer Walter Wanger (he was also responsible for two earlier Criterion releases, Stagecoach and Foreign Correspondent) as a hard-hitting, gritty, realistic picture depicting the inequities and maltreatment prisoners receive in American prisons. Wanger had a personal reason to make a film like that. He had barely missed spending some time in one. He’d caught his wife with another man, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Stand Alone with Michael Moore

7 April 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Michael Moore at First Time Fest Stand Alone: "And the other film I saw at that time was a film made with Barbie Dolls. It's called Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Michael Moore in a seated Stand Alone with Director of Programming David Schwartz discussed how he got into filmmaking through his immersion in the cinema of Akira Kurosawa, Ingmar Bergman, François Truffaut, Federico Fellini and sneaking in to see Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange.

David Schwartz to Michael Moore: "And Kubrick? You said Clockwork Orange was a favorite." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

This year's First Time Fest First Exposure series includes Julie Taymor's Titus, starring Anthony Hopkins, Jessica Lange, Alan Cumming - Salesman directed by Charlotte Zwerin, Albert and David Maysles - James Toback's Fingers starring Harvey Keitel - David Lynch's Eraserhead with Dp Frederick Elmes in person - Kelly Reichardt's River Of Grass »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Boy, Bike, Ridley and Tony

2 April 2014 12:37 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Yesterday I stumbled on the following short film from Ridley Scott titled "Boy and Bicycle" of which he directed in 1962 while a student at the Royal College of Art in London. Shot over the course of six weeks, for ?65 (approx. $108 today) on 16mm and featuring his brother, the late Tony Scott, in the lead role, the short follows a young teen as he skips school. The film was shot in various locations in Hartlepool, North East England. The short would eventually be finished in 1965 when Scott secured financing from the British Film Institute and would then include theme music by James Bond composer John Barry. The short immediately caught my eye and after searching the Internet for commentary from others, most of which feel they see imagery they will later recognize in Scott's Alien, Blade Runner and Black Rain, I think the more obvious discussion points are visual comparisons to »

- Brad Brevet

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Michael Kohlhaas wins at Athens Francophone fest

27 March 2014 4:04 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Festival guests include Nathalie Baye, Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi Jalil Lespert and Vincent Macaigne.

Michael Kohlhaas by Arnaud de Pallieres was awarded best film at the 15th Athens Francophone film festival (March 19-26) backed by Unifrance.

The award sponsored by the French public channel TV5 and the Athens Municipality carries a purse of €9,000 to back the release of the film in Greece by Seven Films and Spentzos Films.

A special mention was given to Bruno Dumont’s Camille Claudel 1915, starring Juliette Binoche in the eponymous role.Videorama Films/Odeon acquired for Greece.

The five-member jury was comprised of the French-Greek actor George Corraface (president), Greek film producer Fenia Kosovitsa, French film scholar and director Antoine Danis, Greek born-French resident composer Olga Kouklaki and Greek film critic Yiannis Zoumpoulakis.

The audience award, backed by Fischer Breweries with €6,000, went to Marion Vernoux’s Les Beaux Jours starring Fanny Ardant. Produced by the French outlet Les Films du Kiosque, the film will »

- alexisgrivas@yahoo.com (Alexis Grivas)

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Richard Ayoade: 'Making films is exhilarating – and terrifying'

23 March 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Richard Ayoade shot to fame as Moss in The It Crowd but it was Submarine, his debut behind the camera, that won him critical acclaim. As his new film, The Double, is released, he talks about pride, performing and giving up his pop dreams

The premise of Fyodor Dostoevsky's 1846 novella The Double is simple but ingenious: a man lives an entirely unremarkable existence until one day his exact doppelganger shows up. This incongruous situation fast becomes insufferable for two reasons: first, the new guy is slick where he is stammering, popular where he's forgettable, Day-Glo to his beige; and, second, because no one else notices any likeness at all between the pair of them.

The Double, it's said, is meant as an allegory: the straight man is Dostoevsky in real life, shy and often awkward; the arriviste is the author 2.0, the person he sometimes wished he was, who is quick-witted and irresistible to women. »

- Tim Lewis

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Richard Ayoade: 'Making films is exhilarating – and terrifying'

23 March 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Richard Ayoade shot to fame as Moss in The It Crowd but it was Submarine, his debut behind the camera, that won him critical acclaim. As his new film, The Double, is released, he talks about pride, performing and giving up his pop dreams

The premise of Fyodor Dostoevsky's 1846 novella The Double is simple but ingenious: a man lives an entirely unremarkable existence until one day his exact doppelganger shows up. This incongruous situation fast becomes insufferable for two reasons: first, the new guy is slick where he is stammering, popular where he's forgettable, Day-Glo to his beige; and, second, because no one else notices any likeness at all between the pair of them.

The Double, it's said, is meant as an allegory: the straight man is Dostoevsky in real life, shy and often awkward; the arriviste is the author 2.0, the person he sometimes wished he was, who is quick-witted and irresistible to women. »

- Tim Lewis

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The Definitive Original Screenplays: 20-11

12 March 2014 3:29 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The top 20. The scripts by which all others are defined and to which all others are compared. Brilliant scripts can be wordy. Brilliant scripts can be confusing. Brilliant scripts can be sweeping or intimate. This section runs the gamut, ranging from first time writers to established writing vets. It only gets better from here.

courtesy of wikipedia.org

20. Easy Rider (1969)

Written by Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, and Terry Southern

They’ll talk to ya and talk to ya and talk to ya about individual freedom. But they see a free individual, it’s gonna scare ‘em.

This portion’s “anybody can write a film” segment comes from 1969, with a landmark film that truly doesn’t have much weight. A road movie if there ever was one, Easy Rider follows Wyatt (Peter Fonda) and Billy (Dennis Hopper) as they ride their motorcycles across the country to New Orleans for Mardi Gras. »

- Joshua Gaul

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Alain Resnais snubbed at 2014 Oscars

2 March 2014 8:29 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Celebrated French director of Hiroshima Mon Amour and Last Year in Marienbad who died this weekend left out of In Memoriam section of Oscar ceremony

• Xan Brooks liveblogs the ceremony

• Full list of winners as they're announced

The Oscars failed to paid tribute to Alain Resnais, the celebrated French director of Night and Fog and Hiroshima Mon Amour, who died today. Perhaps because of the late-breaking nature of his death, they did not include Resnais in the traditional In Memoriam section to the film-maker.

Resnais was never nominated for an Oscar, though he did receive a string of awards from major international film festivals, including a lifetime achievement award from Cannes in 2009. His feature debut, Hiroshima Mon Amour, was a key early entry in the French new wave, competing at the 1959 Cannes film festival against the likes of François Truffaut's The 400 Blows and Jack Clayton's Room at the Top »

- Andrew Pulver

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Alain Resnais obituary

2 March 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Complex and avant-garde French film director best known for Night and Fog and Last Year in Marienbad

Alain Resnais, who has died aged 91, was a director of elegance and distinction who, despite generally working from the screenplays of other writers, established an auteurist reputation. His films were singular, instantly recognisable by their style as well as through recurring themes and preoccupations. Primary concerns were war, sexual relationships and the more abstract notions of memory and time. His characters were invariably adult (children were excluded as having no detailed past) middle-class professionals. His style was complex, notably in the editing and often – though not always – dominated by tracking shots and multilayered sound.

He surrounded himself with actors, musicians and writers of enormous talent and the result was a somewhat elitist body of work with little concern for realism or the socially or intellectually deprived. Even overtly political works, Night and Fog, »

- Brian Baxter

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French Film Master Alain Resnais Dies

2 March 2014 3:05 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Alain Resnais, a cinema pioneer and a leading light of the French New Wave, died Saturday in Paris, his longtime producer and friend Jean-Louis Livi said. He was 91.

One of the most critically-aclaimed French helmers of all time, Resnais directed such arthouse masterpieces as “Hiroshima Mon Amour,”a flagship pic of the New Wave, which earned writer Marguerite Duras an Oscar nom for original screenplay in 1961, and “Last Year at Marienbad,” a major influence on such directors as David Lynch.

Resnais, who began his career with a number of art documentaries and then broke through with the gripping 1955 “Night and Fog,” about the Jewish Holocaust in WWII, was one of the more intellectually rigorous members of the new wave of filmmakers who overturned the French film industry in the late ’50s.

The French cinema world is mourning Resnais today as critics, industryites, festivals’ toppers and fans pay him homage.

“As »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Why ‘Pompeii’ Doesn’t Blow

25 February 2014 2:55 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

History suggests that it took about six hours for Mt. Vesuvius to bury Pompeii in a thick coat of lava and ash. It took most critics even less time to bury “Pompeii” the movie in volcanic invective, resulting in a woeful 28% “fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes and an only slightly more encouraging 41 on Metacritic. Meanwhile, the vox populi has spoken, leading to a dismal $10 million opening weekend (against a reported $100 million budget). But look closer and, like those flailing limbs jutting out from the real Pompeii’s petrified in-situ corpses, a few persuasive dissenters can be heard amid the dismissive din. They douse the violent inferno with enthusiastic praise for the movie’s action sequences, for its use of 3D, and above all for its director, Paul W.S. Anderson. And they are not wrong to do so. Welcome to the cult of the vulgar auteur.

Of course, one can scarcely »

- Scott Foundas

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Criterion Collection: Breathless | Blu-ray Review

25 February 2014 11:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless gave France’s nascent La nouvelle vague a solid international underpinning and it has remained a vibrant, stylish and entertaining influence on filmmakers for 54 years. Largely improvised and capriciously photographed, Breathless tore away the final threads that bound films to novels – and the formal elements of novels – leaving each medium a little freer to reach their own respective potentials. The narrative of Breathless, and unlike some later Godard films it does have one, is not dispensed through written dialogue designed to advance plot points but rather a capturing of fleeting ideas and quickly dissolving moments in time. Like life itself, some of these moments are big and important while others simply banal markers on the timeline of existence. Breathless gives equal dramatic weight to the climactic and the mundane, throwing a greasy yet elegant monkey wrench into 1960‘s accepted orthodoxy of what a movie was supposed to be. »

- David Anderson

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Blu-ray Review - Classe Tous Risques (1960)

23 February 2014 11:17 PM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Classe Tous Risques, 1960.

Directed by Claude Sautet.

Starring Lino Ventura, Sandra Milo, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Marcel Dalio and Michel Ardan.

Synopsis:

On the run with two small children, how long can criminal Abel Davos outrun those in pursuit and his destiny?

The same year cinema was left Breathless by Jean-Luc Godard's revolutionary tour de force, its star Jean-Paul Belmondo found himself yet again on the wrong side of the law in Claude Sautet's Classe Tous Risques; this time swapping the pursuit of Jean Seberg for Sandra Milo.

Sautet’s Classe Tous Risques' ageing protagonist features shades of Jean Gabin and Roger Duchesne in Jacque Becker's Pas au Grisbi and Jean-Pierre Melville’s Bob le Flambeur - two seminal French gangster films of the 1950s.

Alongside Francois Truffaut who was made to look decidedly human in 1960 following his seminal 1959 film Les Quatre Cents Coups (The 400 Blows), Classe Tous Risques »

- Gary Collinson

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Kay Mander obituary

23 February 2014 6:54 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Documentary maker who battled sexism in the film industry of postwar Britain and went on to work in continuity

The pioneering film-maker Kay Mander, who has died aged 98, was a member of the British documentary movement and began directing during the second world war, making training films and social documentaries for the Ministry of Information. In 1944, she established her own production company, Basic Films, and like many of her male contemporaries attempted to break into feature films after the war. But she struggled to find directing jobs and spent the rest of her long career in continuity.

Born in Hull, east Yorkshire, Mander grew up in Paris, later boarding at Queenwood ladies' college, in Eastbourne, East Sussex. After leaving school, she moved to Berlin, where her father was employed as an accountant. While working as a receptionist at an international film congress in 1935, she met British film-makers who suggested she »

- Sarah Easen

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Colcoa reveals classics line-up

19 February 2014 11:23 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

For the first time a daily matinee of a classic film will accompany the new films shown in competition at the upcoming City Of Lights, City Of Angels: A Week Of French Film Premieres In Hollywood.

Classic film screenings include restored versions of Jean Cocteau’s Beauty And The Beast, René Clément’s Purple Noon, Henri-Georges Clouzot’s L’Assassin Habitue Au 21 and Otar Iosseliani’s Favourites Of The Moon.

Colcoa will feature tributes to Patrice Chéreau and Francois Truffaut and a focus on Cédric Klapisch (pictured).

The 18th edition of the festival will run at the Directors Guild Of America headquarters from April 21-28. »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Colcoa Spotlights Cedric Klapisch And Pays Tribute To Patrice Chereau, Francois Truffaut

19 February 2014 8:17 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris–  L.A.-based Colcoa (City of Lights, City of Angels) festival will turn the spotlight on Cedric Klapisch, the popular French helmer of “Auberge Espagnole” and more recently “Chinese Puzzle” with Romain Duris, Audrey Tautou and Cecile de France.

Succeeding to Bertrand Blier, Alain Resnais and Costa Gavras, among other famed French directors, Klapisch will be the Focus on Filmmaker honoree of the 18th edition. He will be on hand to present his 2002 hit dramedy “L’Auberge Espagnole” followed by the premiere of his latest pic, the New York-set pic “Chinese Puzzle,” ahead of its U.S. release which will be handled by Cohen Media Group in May.  Klapisch will also meet the audience for a Happy Hour Talk panel discussing his work.

Colcoa Classics will pay homage to the late French auteur Patrice Chereau with a special presentation of the restored director’s cut of  Isabelle Adjani starred ”Queen Margot, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Film Review: ‘Ain’t Misbehavin”

17 February 2014 11:37 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In spanning eight decades, Marcel Ophuls’ filmed autobiography “Ain’t Misbehavin’” incorporates a wide array of approaches: nostalgia-filled interviews with celebrated contemporaries, whimsical excerpts from Hollywood films, samplings from his own and his father’s oeuvres, and jaunts to the sites of past traumas and triumphs. Ophuls obviously greatly relishes his role as cosmopolitan raconteur, but his spontaneous delivery can feel over-rehearsed, his focus erratic. Film buffs will doubtless appreciate his imaginative use of free-associative film clips and anecdotes about Preston Sturges, Marlene Dietrich and Francois Truffaut, but “Misbehavin’” ultimately seems too patchy to resonate with wider audiences.

Ophuls’ remembrance of his early life offers a nearly miraculous confluence of personal, cinematic and world history. As the son of famed German-Jewish director Max Ophuls, who left Germany for France and from there escaped to Hollywood, young Marcel found himself at the center of international film production as well as the Holocaust, »

- Ronnie Scheib

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Interview with Kent Jones about The Last of the Unjust, Kubrick, Spielberg, and Arnaud Desplechin

16 February 2014 8:46 AM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Claude Lanzmann with Kent Jones on The Last of the Unjust: "The general tone of Shoah was epic. This is not epic." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In part two of our conversation, Kent Jones and I continue with questions of memory and justice and discuss the connective tissue of World War II in Jimmy P: Psychotherapy Of A Plains Indian with Claude Lanzmann's The Last of the Unjust and Shoah, Stanley Kubrick's unfinished Aryan Papers, Kristina Söderbaum, Thomas and Veit Harlan and the positioning of Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List.

In part one we discussed the loops to Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master, the place of the American landscape, why Sam Shepard's mystical west is radically different from what is shown in Arnaud Desplechin's Jimmy P. and how the relationship of cinema and psychoanalysis falls flat - from Alfred Hitchcock to Robert Bresson and François Truffaut. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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What I Watched, What You Watched #231

9 February 2014 7:00 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

This week I caught three movies in theaters, two I've already reviewed -- The Lego Movie and The Monuments Men -- and the other is Winter's Tale, which I don't think I'm able to review just yet, but I will say I was expecting something terrible and that's not what I got... I'll say more next week when it hits theaters. At home I watched Francois Truffaut's Jules and Jim on Criterion Blu-ray, which I reviewed and only two people, sadly commented... Hopefully more people come to the table with thoughts and opinions when I review Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent this coming week. I watched the new Criterion Blu-ray this week as well. Also, I finally saw Paul Thomas Anderson's Hard Eight, which played Sundance and Cannes in '96 before being released in the States in '97, the same year Anderson's Boogie Nights was released. In fact, »

- Brad Brevet

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New on Video: ‘Jules and Jim’

7 February 2014 6:39 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Jules and Jim

Directed by François Truffaut

Written by François Truffaut and Jean Gruault

France, 1962

In François Truffaut’s debut feature, The 400 Blows, widely seen as the flagship production of the French Nouvelle Vague, or “New Wave,” he was able to convey a representation of youth in a very specific era and, at that time, in a very unique way. Autobiographical as the 1959 film was, it also featured a notable vitality and honesty, two traits that would distinguish several of these French films from the late 1950s and into the ’60s. While The 400 Blows was an earnest and refreshing portrayal of adolescence, in some ways, Truffaut’s 1962 feature, Jules and Jim, his third, feels even more youthful, in terms of stylistic daring and energetic exuberance. Though dealing with adults and serious adult situations, Jules and Jim exhibits a formal sense of unbridled glee, with brisk editing, amusing asides, »

- Jeremy Carr

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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