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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007

1-20 of 108 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


The Dreamers: Valérie Donzelli Completes Casting for “Marguerite et Julien” (aka Abandoned Truffaut Project)

30 September 2014 1:30 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Valérie Donzelli, the actress-turned director who we most recently caught as a supporting player in the garishly dressed Saint Laurent, Bertrand Bonello’s stylized biopic might have found a taste for risky content as cameras are set to lense next week on her fourth feature film. The Cineuropa folks report that Donzelli has completed the casting on Marguerite et Julien, a project that François Truffaut flirted with but ultimately passed on. Completing the cast we find Aurélia Petit (The Science of Sleep), vet thesps Sami Frey and Geraldine Chaplin, reuniting with her fellow Declaration of War‘s Frédéric Pierrot and Bastien Bouillon who join the previously announced duo of Anaïs Demoustier (you can find her in Ozon’s latest, the recently acquired Cohen Media’s The New Girlfriend) and Jérémie Elkaïm (full-time collaborator with Donzelli who we also discovered in Declaration of War). Rectangle ProductionsEdouard Weil (Benoît Jacquot’s »

- Eric Lavallee

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Watch: The Criterion Collection Supercut 'Eyes Of Hitchcock'

30 September 2014 9:05 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The Criterion Collection loves it some Alfred Hitchcock. And why wouldn’t they? The legendary director entertained, thrilled and terrified movie and TV viewers for years, and the company currently has editions of "The 39 Steps," "Foreign Correspondent," "The Lady Vanishes," and "The Man Who Knew Too Much." The director had no shortage of obsessions, and eyes are near the top of that list.  In his 1967 book, “Hitchcock,” François Truffaut quoted Hitch as saying, “Dialogue should simply be a sound among other sounds, just something that comes out of the mouths of people whose eyes tell the story in visual terms.” We can see how truly he believed this in a new video by filmmaker :: kogonada. Featuring a score by Rob Cawley, the video essay pays tribute to the way the master of suspense focused on his characters’ eyes to reflect (with no small degree of tension) what was happening in his films. »

- Zach Hollwedel

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Abu Dhabi Fest Unveils Rich Lineup Mixing Arab World Preems And Standout International Pics

29 September 2014 6:09 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Abu Dhabi Film Festival has unveiled a rich lineup comprising eight world preems from the Arab world, including Egyptian helmer Ibrahim El Batout’s organ trafficking thriller “El Ott” and its previously announced opener, Arabic road movie “A to B” by Emirati helmer Ali F. Mostafa, alongside a savvy selection of the cream of this year’s festival season crop.

Co-produced by twofour54, the media hub behind the fest, and by government-backed film and TV outfit Image Nation, “A to B” marks the first time Abu Dhabi, now at its eighth edition, opens with a pic by an Emirati helmer.

El Ott” (aka “The Cat”) (pictured) is produced by Egyptian star/multihyphenate Amr Waked (“Lucy”), who also stars. It has topical hook since Egypt’s recent political upheavals have left a law enforcement gap in the country, allowing mob-led organ-trafficking rings to thrive, according to reports.

The Arab selection »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Abu Dhabi scores nine world premieres

29 September 2014 4:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Adff to present 197 films from 61 countries.

The 2014 Abu Dhabi Film Festival (Adff), backed by twofour54, will present nine feature world premieres, eight of them from the Arab world. The short film sections will host 48 world premieres.

The festival will open with Ali Mostafa’s From A to B [pictured], and festival director Ali Al-Jabri said: “It is the first time in the festival’s history that we opening with an Emirati film and we ares very proud about this landmark event.”

The festival runs October 23 to November 1 and presents 197 films from 61 countries.

For the second year, the festival host the Child Protection Award organised with the Child Protection Centre of the Ministry of Interior, to spotlight films that raise awareness about abused or neglected children. Films competing for that prize include Zerensenay Mehari’s Difret, Albert Shin’s In Her Place, and Cyprien Vial’s Young Tiger.

The Showcase section includes films such as ‘71, A Pigeon Sat on »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Daily | Truffaut, Hogg, Deleuze

24 September 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

François Truffaut's 1975 collection of criticism, The Films in My Life, is being reissued, and Max Nelson reviews it for Film Comment. Also in today's roundup of news and views: Joanna Hogg on Chantal Akerman, Gilles Deleuze on cinema and philosophy, B. Ruby Rich on Roger Ebert, Darren Hughes and Michael Leary on Claire Denis, Matt Connolly on Martin Scorsese, Glenn Kenny's interview with David Thomson and news of forthcoming projects from Julie Delpy, Damien Chazelle, Terry Gilliam and more. » - David Hudson »

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Abu Dhabi unveils Emirates competition films

22 September 2014 5:12 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Women directors make up 70% of competition films.

Abu Dhabi Film Festival (Adff) (Oct 23-Nov 1) has announced the selection for this year’s Emirates Film Competition (Efc).

The upcoming edition of the competition features a total of 53 films, of which 37 films are directed by women, across a variety of genres.

The line up also features films by Emirati filmmakers such as Nasser Al Tamimi’s Female Scream, Nasser Al-Yaqoubi’s Haneen, Hassan Kiyani’s Marwan The Boxer and Ali Mostafa’s musical Rise. In addition, Sarah Al Agroobi’s Super Lochal is among the selected films.

Desire by Hala Matar (Bahrain, starring Johnny Knoxville) has been selected for Adff’s Short Film Competition along with Koshk, from Emirati director Abdullah Al-Kaabi. These two films will participate in both Efc and the Short Film Competition.

Highly anticipated films from the Gcc region include Now Showing directed by Abdullah Al Daihani (Kuwait), Rainbow directed by Mahmood Al-Shaikh (Bahrain) and 623 directed »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Charles Aznavour: Concert Review

21 September 2014 9:45 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

It would make perfect sense for Charles Aznavour to be giving his farewell concert in New York, as has been advertised for his show Saturday night at the Theater at Madison Square Garden. The French-Armenian singer/songwriter — who was named entertainer of the century in a 1998 CNN poll, beating out the likes of Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan — is, after all, 90 years old. Having written some 1,000 songs, sold over 100 million records and achieved cinema immortality via some 60 films, including Francois Truffaut’s Shoot the Piano Player, he could well afford to rest on his

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- Frank Scheck

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Bimal Roy Retrospective at Jagran Film Festival

19 September 2014 12:52 AM, PDT | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

The 5th Jagran Film Festival, to be held from September 22-28 in Mumbai, will host a Retrospective of Bimal Roy. His films, Sujata, Do Bigha Zameen, Madhumati, Devdas and Bandini will be screened at the festival.

This will mark the final leg of Jagran Film Festival which has traveled across 16 cities. The films will be screened at PVR Andheri and Cinemax Versova.

The festival will open with The Woods are Still Green, an Austrian feature film directed by Marko Nabersnik, set during the first World War.

The festival will present a special section of films on the First World War on the occasion of the war’s centennial. The films to be screened include Grand Illusion (La Grande Illusion) directed by Jean RenoirLa France directed by Serge Bozon ​and Jules and Jim (Jules et Jim) directed by François Truffaut.

The Indian section of the festival will screen films like Highway, »

- NewsDesk

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Spc's Barker and Bernard to receive French honour

10 September 2014 1:18 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Co-founders and co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics to receive France’s highest decoration.

Michael Barker and Tom Bernard, co-founders and co-presidents of Sony Pictures Classics, are to be awarded the Chevalier of the French Legion of Honour at a ceremony on Sept 22 in New York.

Over the past 30 years, Barker and Bernard have grown Sony Pictures Classics to become the number one French film distributor in the Us and the honour will recognise their longstanding commitment to promoting French directors including François Truffaut, Jean-Jacques Beineix, Bertrand Blier, Louis Malle and Eric Rohmer.

Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Laurent Fabius, will bestow the honours on the duo for encouraging French cinema and cultural diplomacy in the Us.

In a statement, Fabius lauded Barker and Bernard for “transporting the essence of France to screens across America… breaking down the barriers of national borders and creating bridges between intellectual and cultural spheres while also enriching a trans-continental cultural »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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The HeyUGuys World Cinema Index: France – Five Films to Start With

10 September 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

To categorise an entire country’s cinematic output in a single article is a seemingly impossible task, and one that will likely leave a cavalcade of audiences wondering where their favourite releases are located.

This feature however is designed as a tool to guide and inform viewers who perhaps aren’t as well-versed in the incredible range of motion pictures available worldwide, and to point them in the right direction so they can experience some truly remarkable content; to find a hidden gem.

The country that opened one’s eyes to the unfathomable range, beauty and quality of cinema was our geographically-near cousins France; the filmic culture thrives in amongst the quaint Parisian apartments, the swelling cigarette smoke and the existential conversations shared. Cinema’s rich history really began in France; revolutionary auteurs such as Georges Méliès, the Lumière Brothers and Luis Buñuel paved the way for the plethora of »

- Chris Haydon

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Venice Film Review: ‘No One’s Child’

8 September 2014 4:11 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It takes a pack of wolves to raise the young protagonist of “No One’s Child,” and the dogs of of war to drop him back into the abyss. Such is the cruel arc of Serbian writer-director Vuk Rsumovic’s captivating debut feature, based on the true story of a feral boy’s gradual assimilation into supposed civilization after being discovered in the Bosnian wilderness. Integrating universal human drama with pointed political context whileBoosted by a deserved Critics’ Week victory at Venice, this “Child” is unlikely to go unclaimed by distributors and further fest programmers for long.

The premise of “No One’s Child” might lead savvy viewers to expect a virtual rerun of Francois Truffaut’s neglected 1970 gem “The Wild Child.” Indeed, the films do open similarly, with a title card solemnly establishing the story’s fact-based credentials leading into a tense, agitated sequence depicting the woodland flush-out of »

- Guy Lodge

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'Bill Murray Day' Celebrated at the Toronto International Film Festival

6 September 2014 9:02 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

While many consider Groundhog Day to be an annual celebration to the hilarious and distinguished career of Bill Murray, the Toronto International Film Festival officially declared September 5th as "Bill Murray Day," and the fest and its attendees paid tribute to the comedian with a retrospective of his work (including screenings of Ghostbusters and Stripes), a Q&A session, and the world premiere of Murray's latest film St. Vincent with Melissa McCarthy.

A sudden burst of heavy rain attempted to mar "Bill Murray Day" in the Canadian city as hundreds of fans became soaked, »

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Blu-ray Review: 'Stolen Kisses' & 'Bed & Board'

2 September 2014 10:22 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★If The 400 Blows (1959) constituted the songs of innocence for Antoine Doinel, then Stolen Kisses (1968) and Bed & Board (1970) make up his songs of experience. Made in relatively quick succession almost a decade after director François Truffaut's iconic debut, they found Jean-Pierre Leaud's hero mired in the negotiations of adulthood. The key to understanding Doinel's transitions is Antoine & Colette (1962), a modest short film made by Truffaut as a part of Pierre Roustang's omnibus project, Love at Twenty (with Shintaro Ishihara and Marcel Ophüls). A portrait of teenage Antoine's pursuit of beauty Colette, the semi-autobiographical work introduces us to the primary drives of his adult life.

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- CineVue UK

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French Film Festival UK unveils lineup

15 August 2014 5:37 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Touring festival to show Cannes titles and spotlight Resnais, Truffaut and Tati.

The touring French Film Festival UK (Nov 5 – Dec 4) will host Cannes titles including Mathieu Amalric’s The Blue Room (La Chambre Bleue), Jean-Luc Godard’s 3D trip Goodbye to Language (Adieu Au Langage), and Camera d’Or winner Party Girl, directed by Marie Amachoukeli.

The festival, which travels to cities between Inverness and London, will open with Belgian director Lucas Belvaux’s Not My Type (Pas mon genre), the cultural and social divide romantic comedy with Emilie Dequenne and Loïc Corbery.

There will be tributes to the late Alain Resnais, with screenings of a restored copy of his first feature Hiroshima Mon Amour and the director’s last film Life of Riley, as well as films from François Truffaut and Jacques Tati.

The festival’s First World War focus revolves around a screening of the 1931 classic Wooden Crosses (Les Croix de Bois) by Raymond Bernard.

Cannes »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Film Review: ‘Marie’s Story’

14 August 2014 3:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Born five years after Helen Keller in Vertou, France, Marie Heurtin faced many of the same challenges, growing up deaf and blind in a society whose instinct was to institutionalize such girls. “Marie’s Story,” therefore, is not so different from Keller’s, amounting to a French “Miracle Worker” with the bonus miracle that it was a nun who accomplished the inspirational breakthrough. Acquired by Film Movement in advance of its Locarno Film Festival premiere, this compelling 19th-century drama offers slight but satisfying variations on one of American drama’s best-loved tales, spelling awards heft abroad and sleeper potential Stateside.

Whereas every American child knows how Keller learned to communicate, thanks to her autobiography and the 1962 film, Heurtin’s story isn’t widely known in France — nor is the unfortunate meme of off-color jokes schoolchildren make concerning Keller’s twin handicaps. That should make for a relatively pure viewing experience abroad, »

- Peter Debruge

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Waiting for Godard: The French New Wave and Music Videos

9 August 2014 7:55 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The French New Wave, that cinematic movement from the 1960s that essentially defined iconoclasm for film, has undoubtedly had its impact on nearly everything, from film to music to style. And given its indelible impact on cultural history, it’s one of the easiest artistic movements to pull from, as demonstrated from three key music videos inspired by, ripped off from, and celebrating the auteurs from Godard to Truffaut.

Dancing with Myself” – Nouvelle Vague

There’s a bit of irony and wordplay going on here. First, the band’s name is Nouvelle Vague, nodding to both the French New Wave and the New Wave in music during the 1980s. Then there’s the name of the album that the French cover band chose to use: Bande à Part, from the Jean-Luc Godard film of the same name. Then there’s the actual music video. Rather than go about “creating” a music video for their single, »

- Kyle Turner

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Blu-ray Review: 'Jules et Jim' & 'Shoot the Pianist'

28 July 2014 7:53 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★French critic and auteur François Truffaut's tone and style have been both successfully and unsuccessfully mined by numerous directors over the years, including the likes of Wes Anderson, Richard Ayoade and Shane Meadows. Never as knowingly hip and revolutionary as others, his cinema belongs to Renoir and Vigo, and is carried on by that doomed depressive Leos Carax. Truffaut claimed that if he walked into a casino, his first instinct would be to master the rules. Godard's first instinct, Truffaut added, would be to invent new ones. With his second and third films, Shoot the Pianist (1960) and Jules et Jim (1962) - both rereleased this week - we see a true master at work.

»

- CineVue UK

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1973 Look Back: The End of the New Wave, the Beginning of My Cinephilia

27 July 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The team is looking back at 1973 as we approach the Smackdown. Here's Amir with a personal history...

the first known photo of this famous cineaste pair. Before they were filmmakers. [src]Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut were the poster boys of the French New Wave, its most recognizable faces. Their friendship that had begun in the 1940s had carried them through all their years at Cahiers and into their directing careers, was evidenced by Godard’s adoration of Truffaut’s The 400 Blows and the latter’s providing the story for his friend’s first film, Breathless. Their early writings manifest the division they had from the beginning about their outlook on the mechanics and politics of cinema. Nonetheless, their friendship continued even through the fraught days of political disagreement in 1968; but no further than 1973. Truffaut’s Day for Night (La Nuit Americaine) was an unforgivable crime in Godard’s eyes, »

- Amir S.

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The Official Lineup for the 67th Locarno Film Festival

25 July 2014 1:13 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: Pedro Costa's Horse Money

The Locarno Film Festival has announced their lineup for the 67th edition, taking place this August between the 6th and 16th. It speaks for itself, but, um, wow...

"Every film festival, be it small or large, claims to offer, if not an account of the state of things, then an updated map of the art form and the world it seeks to represent. This cartography should show both the major routes and the byways, along with essential places to visit and those that are more unusual. The Festival del film Locarno is no exception to the rule, and I think that looking through the program you will be able to distinguish the route map for this edition." — Carlo Chatrian, Artistic Director

 Above: Matías Piñeiro's The Princess of France

Concorso Internazionale (Official Competition)

A Blast (Syllas Tzoumerkas, Greece/Germany/Netherlands)

Alive (Jungbum Park, South Korea)

Horse Money (Pedro Costa, »

- Notebook

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Conversation with Naomi Foner and Maggie Gyllenhaal about Very Good Girls

22 July 2014 11:45 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Very Good Girls director Naomi Foner with her daughter Maggie Gyllenhaal at the Tribeca Grand Hotel: "My mother has a real passion for the truth." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Naomi Foner's Tribeca Film Very Good Girls stars Elizabeth Olsen and Dakota Fanning with Boyd Holbrook, Ellen Barkin, Richard Dreyfuss, Clark Gregg, Demi Moore and Peter Sarsgaard. Maggie Gyllenhaal and Sarsgaard, Mamie Gummer and Cary Joji Fukunaga hosted the evening with producer Norton Herrick, designer Nanette Lepore and her daughter Violet, Tali Lennox (daughter of Annie Lennox and film producer Uri Fruchtmann), Stephanie Lacava, Kick Kennedy and Hailey Gates among those attending.

Before the screening, Foner spoke to us about Katharine Hepburn, François Truffaut's Jules Et Jim and the lack of female role models.

Maggie Gyllenhaal on Peter Sarsgaard in Very Good Girls: "You have to use your imagination what it might be like to be directed by your mother-in-law. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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