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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001

1-20 of 52 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


A Year With Kate: Pat and Mike (1952)

9 July 2014 11:24 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 28 of 52: In which Katharine Hepburn proves hitting like a girl is a good thing.

Guess what! My dad met Katharine Hepburn. Decades before I was born, unfortunately, which seems like poor parenting on his part. Anyway, my dad was a professional tennis player in the early 1970s. Since he looked cute in shorts and was charming company (two traits I inherited from him along with his humility), he’d get invited to parties before tournaments in La and Las Vegas. At one such party, he met Kate the Great. Dad’s words:

“I recall her as being very petite, wonderful husky voice, would look at you directly when speaking… Like so many actors, actresses etc., incredible charisma… Incredible spunk but not an outstanding athlete... By the then Hollywood standards, she may well have been great.”

Please keep in mind that this meeting was twenty years after Pat and Mike, »

- Anne Marie

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Here's Everything You Never Knew About 'Forrest Gump'

4 July 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

You've probably seen "Forrest Gump" so many times in the 20 years since its release (on July 6, 1994) that you can recite the dialogue by heart, starting with the line about life being like a box of chocolates.

You probably know that the film won six Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director (for Robert Zemeckis), Best Actor (for Tom Hanks), and Best Adapted Screenplay (for Eric Roth). You may even know about the digital trickery that was used to insert Hanks's low-iq Everyman into historical footage of real-life events from the Baby Boom years, or to erase Gary Sinise's legs for his role as double-amputee Lt. Dan.

Still, there's a lot you may not know, including what Forrest really said (in Winston Groom's novel that inspired the film) about life being like a box of chocolates, or what Hanks's Gump actually said at that protest rally, or which famous actors »

- Gary Susman

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Readers' Picks: 12 Essential Movies Kids Must Experience Before Turning 13

3 July 2014 7:01 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Last week, EW published The 55 Essential Movies Kids Must Experience (Before Turning 13). Predictably, given that we published a post on the Internet whose headline contained a concrete number and the word “essential,” we got some impassioned feedback from readers—many of whom were eager to suggest additional great movies kids should see that we’d left out.

As we noted last week, “This isn’t a list of the 55 ‘best’ kids movies, nor a compendium of hidden gems. Rather, it’s a survival-guide syllabus of films that we all need to know to be able to speak the same pop-cultural language. »

- EW staff

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A Year with Kate: State of the Union (1948)

18 June 2014 3:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 25 of 52: In which Kate confronts Angela Lansbury onscreen and the Blacklist offscreen and manages to beat both.

 Early on, I stated that sometimes Kate’s career seems charmed. I’d venture 1948 is one of those charmed years. As we saw last week, Song of Love failed--Kate’s first failure at MGM.  Yet some strange circumstances and good luck landed Kate in State of the Union, based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning play. I say “good luck” because in the fall of 1947, the storm that would become the Hollywood Blacklist was brewing, and Kate nearly got caught in the center of it.

Though not as cloyingly obvious as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington - no light from the Lincoln Memorial in this film - State of the Union nevertheless delivers the classic Capra Corn package: nostalgia, patriotism, and a happy ending snatched from the jaws of tragedy at the last second. »

- Anne Marie

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'Father of the Bride 3' Gets a Gay Twist

16 June 2014 7:30 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Well, it's never too late to return to the "Father of the Bride" well, we suppose, as Disney and Warner Bros are currently working on a "Father of the Bride 3," the third film in the trilogy that started in 1991 with "Father of the Bride" and continued in 1995 with "Father of the Bride Part II." (The first film was a remake of a 1950 film of the same name that starred Spencer Tracy and Joan Bennett, while the second was a loose remake of that film's sequel, "Father's Little Dividend," which also starred Tracy and Bennett along with Elizabeth Taylor.) But this time out, there's a gay twist!

According to Nikki Finke, who broke the story, the "twist" is that Little Matty (the little boy from the first two films) is now 29 and gay and getting married to a Navy Seal's son. Oh man, can you imagine the hilarity? Martin will definitely return as the titular father, »

- Drew Taylor

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Kevin Spacey Scolds Audience Member For Ringing Phone On Clarence Darrow's Opening Night

4 June 2014 9:00 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Kevin Spacey was onstage for the opening night of Clarence Darrow at the Old Vic Theater in London when a ringing phone interrupted the play – much to his displeasure.

Kevin Spacey Calls-Out Theatergoer

Oscar-winning actor Spacey put the play on hold to address the member of the audience who failed to put his or her phone on silent before the show. “If you don't answer that I will,” Spacey shouted down to the individual, reported the Daily Mail.

When the cell phone went off, Spacey was in the middle of a monologue in which he was directly addressing the audience. In the scene, his character – a legal pioneer in 19th century America – was on trial defending himself. As Darrow, Spacey was making an impassioned plea directly towards the audience when the ringtone melody began. Spacey continued to perform, but the noise wouldn’t let up, which led him to address the offending theatergoer. »

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A Year with Kate: The Sea of Grass (1947)

4 June 2014 2:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 23 of 52: In which Tracy and Hepburn make a Western because why not?

A lone figure looks out over a vast, unending prairie. A wagon traverses rocky desert trails. Virgin land, a justice-seeking posse, a citified lawyer who brings civilization riding on his pinstriped coat tails. The Western dominated American film for over half a century with images like these. It stands to reason that two American stars and a director on his way to becoming a (controversial) American legend himself would take aim at the genre. The Sea of Grass, the resulting collaboration between Elia Kazan and the Tracy/Hepburn team, is an epic story covering multiple generations in the New Mexico Territory. It’s a Western, but not struck from the same heroic mould that John Ford was making them in Monument Valley. The Sea of Grass is meaner, more melodramatic, and ultimately a maverick mess of a movie. »

- Anne Marie

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A Year with Kate: Without Love (1945)

21 May 2014 12:02 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 21 of 52 of Anne Marie's chronological look at Katharine Hepburn's career.

When a star’s career is as long-lasting and iconic as Katharine Hepburn’s was, there are going to be dramatic highs and lows in terms of quality. Mapped out on a timeline, it would resemble a mountain range. The glittering Mount Holiday would stand tall on the horizon, dwarfed on either side by Bringing Up Baby Peak and The Philadelphia Story Summit. Behind it would be the dark valleys and caves of Rko. However, the most treacherous topographical feature on our Atlas Hepburnica would be the Seven Year Desert, stretching seemingly endlessly from Woman of the Year Peak to Adam’s Rib Ridge. The Seven Year Desert is a vast sea of grass that barrages a traveler with its unending, monotonous mediocrity. Woe to the weary wanderer who gives up, rather than trudge through another undistinguished Hepburn vehicle. »

- Anne Marie

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Can Sony Classics land two Best Actor nominations for 'Foxcatcher?'

20 May 2014 11:43 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I was glued to the Twitter application of my iPhone Sunday night waiting for the reactions to Bennett Miller's "Foxcatcher" to roll in as the film bowed in Competition at the Cannes Film Festival. It was interesting to watch the first wave of knee-jerks, all of them just a touch muted, I assume because Miller is not a filmmaker whose movies hit you right away. They kind of seep into you the more you spin away from them, and I got the feeling "Foxcatcher" is absolutely one such example. We were all more or less expecting something special out of Steve Carell here. From photos and that early trailer that slipped out last fall, it was clear he had undergone a transformation for the role of multimillionaire murderer John du Pont, both physically and professionally. And indeed, all indications are that it is a career-altering portrayal. Here's one juicy »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Modern Family Season Finale Review: “The Wedding (Part 1)” (Season 5, Episode 23)

14 May 2014 10:37 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

And we have made it – well, almost – to the climactic gay wedding promised in the first episode of season five, which was itself spawned from the decision to reinstate same-sex marriage in California. The wedding is a tried and true staple of beloved, long-running sitcoms, and splitting the big event into a two-episode finale (the second half will air next Wednesday, May 21) was a smart move.

The two-part finale of Modern Family should give the writers enough time to chart where the characters are at in this pivotal moment, which could be a midpoint of this blossoming series. However, there were probably too many cooks in the kitchen for part one, with episode scribes Abraham Higginbotham, Ben Karlin and Jeffrey Richman carving up the ensemble into six separate groups for 21 minutes, cluttering the very special episode.

The major story this week is between the almost husbands. Cam realizes that his »

- Jordan Adler

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Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Star of The F.B.I., Dies at 95

3 May 2014 11:15 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Handsome, debonair and blessed with a distinguished voice that reflected his real-life prep-school upbringing, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. seemed born to play the television roles that made him famous, that of hip Hollywood detective and brilliant G-man. A prolific actor who also appeared in numerous films and stage productions, Zimbalist became a household name in 1958 as Stu Bailey, the wisecracking private investigator who was a co-partner in a swinging Hollywood detective agency located at the exclusive address of 77 Sunset Strip. When the show ended in 1964, Zimbalist became an even bigger star playing the empathetic, methodical G-man Lewis Erskine in "The F.B.I." The actor, »

- Associated Press

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Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Star of The F.B.I., Dies at 95

3 May 2014 11:15 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Handsome, debonair and blessed with a distinguished voice that reflected his real-life prep-school upbringing, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. seemed born to play the television roles that made him famous, that of hip Hollywood detective and brilliant G-man. A prolific actor who also appeared in numerous films and stage productions, Zimbalist became a household name in 1958 as Stu Bailey, the wisecracking private investigator who was a co-partner in a swinging Hollywood detective agency located at the exclusive address of 77 Sunset Strip. When the show ended in 1964, Zimbalist became an even bigger star playing the empathetic, methodical G-man Lewis Erskine in "The F.B.I." The actor, »

- Associated Press

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Icymi, A Smackdown Addendum

26 April 2014 10:58 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Busy busy week but that was mostly the team running around catching Tribeca Screenings. (We'll finish the write-ups very soon). But other than the film festival, I hope you didn't miss these five key posts from the week that was.

A Year With Kate reaches the Spencer Tracy years

Podcast Gets Under the Skin the gang's all back to discuss Noah and Under the Skin 

Looking Back at Pocahontas Disney's ambitious epic 

April Showers: The Piano Holly Hunter was the surprise star of the week because we also finally got to...

2003 Supporting Actress Smackdown Renée vs. Shohreh vs Holly vs Patty vs. Marcia Marcia Marcia. (What a strange Oscar year that was)

Film Bitch Addendum

For those of you wondering which actresses I voted for back in 2003 (many of you weren't around these parts in those early early days), here was my ballot which only had a little Oscar overlap. »

- NATHANIEL R

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Six of The Best Movie Courtroom Scenes

25 April 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The courtroom is the ultimate movie set. The elements of a criminal trial are effectively a scriptwriter’s ‘How To’ guide. The case for the prosecution is pure plot development; the conflict is inherent in two sides making completely opposing arguments. Main characters are set at loggerheads, motives are compromised and minor characters are wheeled in and out as witnesses at the writer’s beck and call. Finally, at its heart there is a mystery that can’t be solved until the judge bangs his gavel for the final time, or maybe just afterwards in a third act sting (see Jagged Edge, for example). It is no wonder Hollywood drags itself back to the courts time and time again.

The courtroom movie really came into prominence in the late 1950s and early 1960s, during the death-throes of monochrome film. Movies like Inherit The Wind, Anatomy of a Murder, 12 Angry Men, »

- Cai Ross

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A Year with Kate: Woman of the Year (1942)

23 April 2014 12:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Episode 17 of 52 of Anne Marie's chronological look at Katharine Hepburn's career.

In which Tracy and Hepburn explode on screen in a dynamic maelstrom of celluloid chemistry.

What sparks great star chemistry? Katharine Hepburn, an actress who was all angles and independence, bottled that lightning not once, but twice, with two men who were polar opposites: Cary Grant and Spencer Tracy. Near the end of Bringing Up Baby, Grant’s character tells Katharine Hepburn “...in moments of quiet, I'm strangely drawn toward you, but, well, there haven't been any quiet moments.” This stuttering sentence sums up the banter-based rapport between Hepburn and Grant that played through their four films together. Watching Grant and Hepburn is watching two master comedians play a scene - glamorous, theatrical, loud, and wonderful. Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy are the complete opposite: authentic, intimate, sexy, and sweet.

Woman of the Year, the first Tracy/Hepburn film, »

- Anne Marie

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Godzilla, Giant Ants, and Other Monsters - and Mickey Rooney: May '14 at LoC's Packard

21 April 2014 5:49 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Godzilla 1954, Mickey Rooney, Giant Ants, Fascists, and rarely seen ‘Musty Stuffer’: Eclectic Packard Theater movies in May 2014 (photo: ‘Godzilla’) Godzilla 1954, Mickey Rooney, military fascists, deadly giant ants, racing car drivers, and The Mishaps of Musty Suffer, a super-rare slapstick comedy series from the 1910s, are a few of the highlights at the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater in May 2014. Godzilla 1954 and fellow movie monsters Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla 2014, starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Juliette Binoche, Ken Watanabe, and Bryan Cranston, opens on May 16 in much of the world. On May 8 at the Packard Theater, you’ll get the chance to check out Ishiro Honda’s Godzilla 1954 aka Gojira — in the original, Toho-released, Japanese-language version (i.e., without Raymond Burr). As part of its Godzilla double bill, the Packard Theater will also present Motoyoshi Oda’s Gigantis, the Fire Monster aka Godzilla Raids Again (1955). Besides Godzilla, the Packard Theater will »

- Andre Soares

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After Rooney's Death, Who Is Earliest Surviving Best Actor Academy Award Nominee?

8 April 2014 6:17 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Mickey Rooney was earliest surviving Best Actor Oscar nominee (photo: Mickey Rooney and Spencer Tracy in ‘Boys Town’) (See previous post: “Mickey Rooney Dead at 93: MGM’s Andy Hardy Series’ Hero and Judy Garland Frequent Co-Star Had Longest Film Career Ever?”) Mickey Rooney was the earliest surviving Best Actor Academy Award nominee — Babes in Arms, 1939; The Human Comedy, 1943 — and the last surviving male acting Oscar nominee of the 1930s. Rooney lost the Best Actor Oscar to two considerably more “prestigious” — albeit less popular — stars: Robert Donat for Sam Wood’s Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939) and Paul Lukas for Herman Shumlin’s Watch on the Rhine (1943). Following Mickey Rooney’s death, there are only two acting Academy Award nominees from the ’30s still alive: two-time Best Actress winner Luise Rainer, 104 (for Robert Z. Leonard’s The Great Ziegfeld, 1936, and Sidney Franklin’s The Good Earth, 1937), and Best Supporting Actress nominee Olivia de Havilland, »

- Andre Soares

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Mickey Rooney Dead At 93

7 April 2014 1:17 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Hollywood legend Mickey Rooney has died at his Los Angeles home. He was 93. With a remarkable career that spanned 10 decades, Mickey Rooney was one of the last surviving  artists to have witnessed the evolution of film – from his first onscreen role in the 1926 silent film Not To Be Trusted, to his appearance in 2011′s The Muppets, and beyond.

After first taking to the stage at the age of 15 months, as part of his parents’ Vaudeville act, Joseph Yule Jr. soon progressed to child stardom – appearing in almost 80 silent comedy shorts as the comic strip character, Mickey McGuire. It was this character that would provide the star’s new name, as his mother decided a change was needed. Joseph Yule Jr. became Mickey Rooney, and signed with MGM in 1934 – soon taking to the screen alongside legends such as Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy.

A Family Affair in 1937 – based on the Broadway »

- Sarah Myles

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Silver Screen legend Mickey Rooney dead at 93

6 April 2014 9:26 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Los Angeles (AP) — Mickey Rooney, the pint-size, precocious actor and all-around talent whose more than 80-year career spanned silent comedies, Shakespeare, Judy Garland musicals, Andy Hardy stardom, television and the Broadway theater, died Sunday at age 93. Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith said that Rooney was with his family when he died at his North Hollywood home. Smith said police took a death report but indicated that there was nothing suspicious and it was not a police case. He said he had no additional details on the circumstances of his passing. Rooney started his career in his parents' vaudeville act while still a toddler, and broke into movies before age 10. He was still racking up film and TV credits more than 80 years later — a tenure likely unmatched in the history of show business. "I always say, 'Don't retire — inspire,'" he told The Associated Press in March 2008. "There's a lot to be done. »

- Anthony McCartney (AP)

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Mickey Rooney, Legendary Actor, Dies at 93

6 April 2014 8:01 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mickey Rooney, the pint-sized actor who was one of MGM’s giant box office attractions in the late ’30s and early ’40s, has died, sources confirm. He was 93.

As adept at comedy as drama and an excellent singer and dancer, Rooney was regarded as the consummate entertainer. During a prolific career on stage and screen that spanned eight decades (“I’ve been working all my life, but it seems longer,” he once said), he was nominated for four Academy Awards and received two special Oscars, the Juvenile Award in 1939 (shared with Deanna Durbin) and one in 1983 for his body of work.

He also appeared on series and TV and in made for television movies, one of which, “Bill,” the touching story of a mentally challenged man, won him an Emmy. He was Emmy nominated three other times. And for “Sugar Babies,” a musical revue in which he starred with Ann Miller, »

- Carmel Dagan

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001

1-20 of 52 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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