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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001

1-20 of 24 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Mel Gibson: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

30 June 2015 1:15 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Mel Gibson, whom I interviewed for Venice Magazine in late 2000, was my first real childhood hero I sat down with. If you were a Gen-x male, Mel Gibson was the closest thing we had to Paul Newman, Steve McQueen and Sean Connery: a guy's guy whom guys wanted to emulate and women wanted to copulate. If you were a guy who liked girls, the math in the previous equation was pretty simple: be like Mel. Sadly, Gibson's life has taken a very public turn for the worse in the last decade, since his personal legal and troubles stemming from a 2006 DUI arrest in Malibu were made public, one from which his image has yet to fully recover. It was an unfortunate fall from grace for a guy who literally had Hollywood, and the world, in the palm of his hand after sweeping the 1995 Oscars with his box office smash "Braveheart. »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

22 June 2015 4:02 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are »

- Andre Soares

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Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

19 June 2015 4:00 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The »

- Andre Soares

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Ron Moody dies by Amber Wilkinson - 2015-06-11 18:02:45

11 June 2015 10:02 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Ron Moody as Fagin Ron Moody has died at age 91. His agent said he had been ill for some time.

The London born comic and acting star had a career spanning more than 60 years but was best known for his Oscar-nominated role as arch-thief Fagin in the 1968 Charles Dickens screen adaptation Oliver! He won a Golden Globe for the role and was nominated for a BAFTA - losing to Spencer Tracy, who won the award posthumously for Guess Who's Coming To Dinner.

Born Ronald Moodnick, he was the son of Jewish immigrants, and didn't come to acting until ater a stint in the Raf and a spell at the London School of Economics, where acting in revue shows became a passion. In later life he became familiar to television audiences through his voice work on animated series The Animals Of Farthing Wood and in the guest role of Edwin in EastEnders. »

- Amber Wilkinson

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2016 Oscar Predictions: Best Actor

9 June 2015 1:49 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Best Actor could once again (as it almost always is these days) be an ultra-competitive race full of some of major A-listers. Leonardo DiCaprio, Johnny Depp, Will Smith, Bradley Cooper (going for his fourth nomination in a row), Robert Redford (who has never won for acting, and is coming off that "All Is Lost" snub) Michael Fassbender (with three juicy roles), Jake Gyllenhaal (with two, and coming off not being nominated for "Nightcrawler") and Don Cheadle -- all of whom have never won -- have films coming out this year that scream Oscar (at least on paper) and all of them are due. They might have to compete against someone who is definitely not due, though, as Eddie Redmayne could be in the running again for his role as a transgender artist in Tom Hooper's "The Danish Girl." Could Eddie Redmayne be the next Tom Hanks or Spencer Tracy, »

- Peter Knegt

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Do audiences want quality movies? L.A. Earthquake Flick to Pass Domestic $100M Mark Today

8 June 2015 7:24 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'San Andreas' movie with Dwayne Johnson. 'San Andreas' movie box office: $100 million domestic milestone today As the old saying (sort of) goes: If you build it, they will come. Warner Bros. built a gigantic video game, called it San Andreas, and They have come to check out Dwayne Johnson perform miraculous deeds not seen since ... George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, released two weeks earlier. Embraced by moviegoers, hungry for quality, original storylines and well-delineated characters – and with the assistance of 3D surcharges – the San Andreas movie debuted with $54.58 million from 3,777 theaters on its first weekend out (May 29-31) in North America. Down a perfectly acceptable 52 percent on its second weekend (June 5-7), the special effects-laden actioner collected an extra $25.83 million, trailing only the Melissa McCarthy-Jason Statham comedy Spy, (with $29.08 million) as found at Box Office Mojo.* And that's how this original movie – it's not officially a remake, »

- Zac Gille

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Remembering Pretty, Sophisticated Cummings: From Minor Lloyd Leading Lady to Olivier Co-Star, Tony Award Winner

17 May 2015 8:21 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Constance Cummings: Actress in minor Hollywood movies became major British stage star Constance Cummings: Actress went from Harold Lloyd and Frank Capra to Noël Coward and Eugene O'Neill Born on May 15, 1910, actress Constance Cummings, whose career spanned about six decades on stage, in films, and on television in both the U.S. and the U.K., would have turned 105 this year. Unlike other Broadway imports such as Ann Harding, Katharine Hepburn, and Claudette Colbert, the pretty, elegant Cummings – who could have been turned into a less edgy Constance Bennett had she landed at Rko or Paramount instead of Columbia – never became a Hollywood star. In fact, her most acclaimed work, whether in films or – more frequently – on stage, was almost invariably found in British productions. That's most likely why the name Constance Cummings – despite the DVD availability of several of her best-received stage performances – is all but forgotten. »

- Andre Soares

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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Miss Osbourne | Blu-ray Review

12 May 2015 10:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Robert Louis Stevenson’s literary horror classic Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was published in 1886, just a decade before the birth of cinema and only two decades prior to its first screen adaptation (William N. Selig’s now lost Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde). Since then a lengthy list of cinematic interpretations have come to fruition, from the 1931 film directed by Rouben Mamoulian which earned Fredric March an Oscar for his performance in the starring role, to the 1941 remake that boasted of names like Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner, through a TV movie featuring Mickey Rooney in his very last screen performance. Despite the lengthy list, there is certainly no adaptation quite like Walerian Borowczyk’s hyper sexualized The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Miss Osbourne.

By 1981, the year of the film’s release, Borowczyk had (somewhat unwillingly) been pegged as an art house »

- Jordan M. Smith

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10 things you (probably) didn’t know about The Wizard of Oz

8 May 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

We’ve been following the Yellow Brick Road for three-quarters of a century and Dorothy hasn’t aged a bit. It's been over 75 years since The Wizard of Oz debuted, quickly becoming a classic film that has delighted generations of the young and young at heart.

The beloved film recently celebrated its diamond anniversary with an impressive remastered blu-ray/dvd release and a tribute at last year’s past Academy Awards ceremony.  Now, the movie is once again coming to the big screen this Saturday, May 9th as part of the Family Favourites programme at participating theatres with each ticket available for $2.99.

Originally released wide in theatres on August 25, 1939 (and a whole week earlier in select theatres in Canada), the move has been subject to many a myth, homage, and parody over its lifetime.

Bust out those ruby red slippers and your little dog too and check out ten facts »

- Rachel West

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10 Most Polarising Actors Of All-Time

7 May 2015 7:38 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Paramount Pictures/Warner Bros. Pictures/New Line Cinema

There are some actors who most people tend to agree are unquestionably great: Robert De Niro, Marlon Brando, Tom Hanks, Spencer Tracy, Laurence Olivier, Paul Newman, Gregory Peck. When famous names like these crop up in conversations about the craft of acting, there are very few who would likely disagree over their talents.

That isn’t always the case, though. One man’s ceiling is another man’s floor, after all, and actors have long split public opinion. Movie-goers tend to thrive on the conflict derived from slating a popular actor, posing questions like: “Why does everybody think they’re so great?”

But there’s a fundamental difference between somebody saying that they love Gary Oldman and another person saying that they think Gary Oldman is a bit overrated – there are some actors who polarise audiences to the point at which the »

- Sam Hill

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Tennessee Attempts to Inherit the Wind Again

16 April 2015 3:17 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

The Tennessee state House voted Wednesday to adopt the Holy Bible as the official state book. The chamber approved the measure 55-38. It is sponsored by Republican Rep. Jerry Sexton, a former pastor, who argued that his proposal reflects the Bible's historical, cultural and economic impact in Tennessee. In addition to the measure ignoring serious constitutional issues, it brings to mind a legendary legal case held in Tennessee nearly a century ago.

The Scopes “Monkey Trial” was held in the small town of Dayton, Tn. in 1925. A substitute high school teacher, John Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school. The trial drew intense international publicity, as two of the nation’s most high-profile attorneys, William Jennings Bryan (prosecution) and Clarence Darrow (defense), argued the case, one of the earliest examples of Fundamentalist vs. Modernist »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Movie Review – Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967)

22 March 2015 1:51 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, 1967.

Directed by Stanley Kramer.

Starring Katherine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy, Sidney Poitier, Katherine HoughtonRoy Glenn and Beah Richards.

Synopsis:

Mr and Mrs Drayton are in for a shock when their daughter brings home her new fiance – Dr. John Prentice Jr, an African-American…

At one point in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? Sidney Poitier, the African-American husband-to-be, tells Spencer Tracy, the father-of-the-bride, how their potential children may become Presidents of the United States. Poitier, lightening the mood, acknowledges that he’ll accept Secretary of State – of course, his wife-to-be is possibly too ambitious. Made in 1967, it seems the filmmakers weren’t too ambitious, and only six years prior to the cinema release date, in Kapiʻolani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii, Barack Hussein Obama II was born. It is difficult to imagine the era in fact. We know the horror stories and the necessity of the civil rights movement, »

- Simon Columb

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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Comic Book Review – Bullet Gal

8 March 2015 7:32 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Zeb Larson reviews Bullet Gal…

Bullet Gal, a comic book series by Australian author Andrez Bergen, is a fascinating series to just fall into. Bullet Gal is a neo-noir science fiction dystopia, set in the fictional city of Heropa. However, the series is meant to be much more than its plot: the really important parts are concerned with deeper questions about the creative process.

Mitzi is a seventeen year-old new arrival to the city of Heropa, a new city founded just after WWII. With her father’s two pistols, she adopts the identity of Bullet Gal, and begins assassinating the city’s criminals. This attracts attention from the city’s heroes, including Lee, a man split into eight identical copies of himself, and the city’s villains, including French femme-fatale Brigit and her gangster boyfriend, Sol Brodsky. Yet there’s something else that’s not quite right about Heropa, and »

- Zeb Larson

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Remembering Actress Wright: Made Oscar History in Unmatched Feat to This Day

4 March 2015 9:02 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright movies: Actress made Oscar history Teresa Wright, best remembered for her Oscar-winning performance in the World War II melodrama Mrs. Miniver and for her deceptively fragile, small-town heroine in Alfred Hitchcock's mystery-drama Shadow of a Doubt, died at age 86 ten years ago – on March 6, 2005. Throughout her nearly six-decade show business career, Wright was featured in nearly 30 films, dozens of television series and made-for-tv movies, and a whole array of stage productions. On the big screen, she played opposite some of the most important stars of the '40s and '50s. It's a long list, including Bette Davis, Greer Garson, Gary Cooper, Myrna Loy, Ray Milland, Fredric March, Jean Simmons, Marlon Brando, Dana Andrews, Lew Ayres, Cornel Wilde, Robert Mitchum, Spencer Tracy, Joseph Cotten, and David Niven. Also of note, Teresa Wright made Oscar history in the early '40s, when she was nominated for each of her first three movie roles. »

- Andre Soares

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"The Interview" of 1969

2 February 2015 5:32 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The Interview and the geopolitical crisis it caused is arguably the most important movie-related story of recent weeks.

The story device featured in The Interview, the idea of a film featuring the assassination of the current ruling leader, is nothing new, and in fact  is seen through much of film’s history. In 1941 a German-in-exile Fritz Lang shown an unsuccessful attack on Adolf Hitler in Man Hunt (this story was also told in BBC’s Rogue Male from 1976 starring Peter O’Toole). The Shaw Brothers used the actual newsreel footage of Queen Elisabeth visiting Hong-Kong (then a British colony) in their 1976 martial arts flick A Queen’s Ransom (a.k.a. The International Assassin) starring post-James Bond George Lazenby as an Ira assassin and Angela Mao as a heroine trying to stop him. In fact, the Queen of England might be the most popular assassination target among actual world leaders »

- Jakub Mejer

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It’S A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World – Criterion Review

22 January 2015 2:49 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Cast

Captain T. G. Culpeper Spencer Tracy J. Russell Finch Milton Berle Melville Crump Sid Caesar Benjy Benjamin Buddy Hackett Mrs. Marcus Ethel Merman Ding Bell Mickey Rooney Sylvester Marcus Dick Shawn Otto Meyer Phil Silvers J. Algernon Hawthorne Terry-Thomas Lennie Pike Jonathan Winters Monica Crump Edie Adams Emeline Finch Dorothy Provine Cabdriver Eddie “Rochester” Anderson Tyler Fitzgerald Jim Backus Man driving in the desert Jack Benny Union official Joe E. Brown Biplane pilot Ben Blue Police sergeant Alan Carney Detective Chick Chandler Mrs. Halliburton Barrie Chase Mayor Lloyd Corrigan Police chief William Demarest Sheriff of Crocket County Andy Devine Ginger Culpeper (voice) Selma Diamond Cabdriver Peter Falk Detective Normal Fell Colonel Wilberforce Paul Ford Deputy sheriff Stan Freberg Billie Sue Culpeper (voice) Louise Glenn Cabdriver Leo Gorcey Fire chief Sterling Holloway Mr. Dinckler Edward Everett Horton Irwin Marvin Kaplan Jimmy the Cook Buster Keaton Nervous motorist Don Knotts Airport »

- Sam Moffitt

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Why is the State of the Union so much better when Sorkin writes about it?

19 January 2015 10:59 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Television and film-makers tend to avoid depicting the annual address. Is it too expensive to film, too sacred – or too boring?

The annual State of the Union address is one of those times when even people who would rather hear about the next season of Game of Thrones or Jennifer Aniston’s secret wedding pay attention to politics. And that’s not only true because the speech takes over the airwaves. It’s a night that brings everyone together with lots of pageantry and shared concern for the country. It’s full of drama and conflict. You would think that it would be all over movies and television. You would be wrong.

The 1948 film State of the Union, where Spencer Tracy plays an airline tycoon who tries to become president, doesn’t actually include a State of the Union address. The American President, a 1995 movie about the president falling in »

- Brian Moylan

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Ranking All 9 Double Winners of the Best Actor Oscar

14 January 2015 6:18 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Nine actors. Eighteen Best Actor Oscars. Let's rank these legendarily thespians much in the way we took a hard look yesterday at the 13 women who scooped up two Best Actress wins. The contenders: Spencer Tracy, Fredric March, Gary Cooper, Marlon Brando, Jack Nicholson, Dustin Hoffman, Tom Hanks, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Sean Penn. Damn. Put on your spurs, Will Kane, because this is a battle of men's men.    »

- Louis Virtel

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2001

1-20 of 24 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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