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1-20 of 144 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Tyler, The Creator Had No Idea Elizabeth Taylor Was an Actress

25 July 2017 8:41 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Well, this was a touch awkward.  Turns out Tyler, The Creator had no idea Elizabeth Taylor was one of the most iconic actresses of all time. Instead, he just thought she had great taste in jewelry.  During an appearance on The Late Show Monday night, the 26-year-old Grammy nominee got on the topic of accessories after Stephen Colbert asked him about the necklace he was wearing.  "Elizabeth Taylor is my jewelry idol," he told Colbert. "Her use of coral is crazy. She's dead now though."  From the sound of his remarks, it was almost as if Tyler, the Creator didn't realize quite how famous Taylor was. That became all the more clear when »

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Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

16 July 2017 5:25 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career.  His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in »

- Carmel Dagan

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Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood’ Dies, at 89

16 July 2017 5:25 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career.  His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in »

- Carmel Dagan

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Diana Rigg: TV’s Sexiest Woman to Mrs. James Bond to ‘Game of Thrones’

14 July 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

On July 16, “Game of Thrones,” the medieval fantasy for people who don’t normally like medieval fantasies, begins its seventh season on HBO. The battle scenes and the dragons are epic, but the series’ success is mostly due to the vivid characters created by George R.R. Martin and the actors.

Especially notable are the powerful women played by Emilia Clarke, Lena Headey — and Diana Rigg.

Rigg, whose birthday arrives a few days after the season premiere — she was born July 20, 1938 — plays Olenna Tyrell, aka the Queen of Thorns. To younger audiences, Rigg is best known for “Thrones,” her role as Mrs. James Bond, and a “Dr. Who” episode. But others remember the TV show that shot her to stardom: “The Avengers” (the real “Avengers,” long before the Marvel team), which was a tongue-in-cheek British spy actioner.

For two seasons, 1965-67, Rigg played Emma Peel, who often wore skin-tight catsuits as she outwitted and outfought evil masterminds. Emma »

- Tim Gray

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Get the Recipe for the Elizabeth Taylor Red Velvet Cupcakes Raising Money to Fight AIDS

12 July 2017 2:59 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Whether you’re working hard on that summer bod or haven’t quite started yet, now’s a great time to take a break and indulge—and make the world a better place while you’re at it.

For the month of July, Sprinkles Cupcakes is offering a gourmet red velvet cupcake adorned with an image of the actress-activist Elizabeth Taylor to benefit the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation. The sweet treat is the second in their Summer Icon series, following last month’s Marilyn Monroe tribute.

Taylor was one of the first celebrities to use her stardom to speak out »

- Liam Berry

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Star Sightings: Kristen Bell & Gal Gadot Party With a Conscience, Jessica Simpson Celebrates Her B-Day and More!

11 July 2017 4:03 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Leave it to celebs like Kristen Bell and Gal Gadot to party with a conscience!

The lovely ladies mingled with fellow actress like Lizzy Caplan, Cat Deeley, Camilla Belle and Emmy Rossum at an exclusive garden party in Los Angeles hosted by n:Philanthropy with fellow conscience brands nyakio and Fashionable. The famous guests snacked on Pure Growth Organic and drank Rethink Water and Viva Xxxii while enjoying a gorgeous sunny SoCal day on a spacious patio. 

Marc Patrick/Bfa

Exclusive: Charlize Theron, Kristen Bell and More Celebrate Their Pups and the Wallis Annenberg PetSpace

After sharing a cheeky topless pic to ring in her 37th birthday on July 10, Jessica Simpson enjoyed dinner at rooftop restaurant Catch La with her husband, Eric Johnson; sister Ashlee Simpson-Ross and her husband, Evan Ross; Bff Cacee Cobb and her husband, Donald Faison; and pal Adrienne Sands. Following birthday toasts from Johnson and Simpson's family, Cobb presented »

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Adam Lambert Will Perform Musical Tribute to Late George Michael at Project Angel Food Gala Event

11 July 2017 3:50 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Adam Lambert will pay tribute to late music legend George Michael with a special performance at Project Angel Food’s 27th Annual Angel Awards in Los Angeles, California, on Aug. 19.

The 35-year-old singer will perform a selection of the icon’s biggest hits at the event, where Michael will also be named the recipient of the Elizabeth Taylor Humanitarian Award.

Watch: Chris Martin Delivers Touching George Michael Tribute

The award reflects Michael’s under-the-radar support of the organization, which provides free meals to people living with illness.

His loyal support included leaving a check for $25,000 on the charity’s doorstep in 1993, right as they were struggling to make ends meet after an influx of AIDS patients turned to Project Angel Food for help.

News: George Michael’s Private Funeral Attended by Family and Friends

From that day on, Michael donated the same amount every year, until his death in 2016.

The event will also honor Ktla’s [link »

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Elsa Martinelli Dead At Age 82; "Hatari!" And "The V.I.Ps" Among Her Screen Credits

10 July 2017 9:54 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Martinelli and Wayne in "Hatari!" (1962)

Elsa Martinelli, who gravitated from modeling to a successful acting career in the 1950s, has died at age 82. Martinelli was a popular model in her native Italy when she was discovered by Kirk Douglas and his wife Anne. The Douglases decided to cast the unknown as an Indian maiden in Kirk's 1955 hit Western "The Indian Fighter". The film raised eyebrows at the time for presenting an inter-racial love affair between their characters. The movie helped successfully launch Martinelli's screen career in European cinema but it would be years before she starred in her next major Hollywood production. In 1962 director Howard Hawks cast her as the female lead opposite John Wayne his big budget African adventure "Hatari!". The film was a sizable hit and Martinelli began to appear in more American studio productions. She starred opposite Charlton Heston in "The Pigeon That Took Rome", with Richard Burton »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

29 June 2017 6:58 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli »

- Andre Soares

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Dysfunctional Heterosexual Couples and Oscar-Winning Cross-Gender Performance: TCM's Gay Pride Comes to an End

29 June 2017 6:54 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride film series comes to a close this evening and tomorrow morning, Thursday–Friday, June 29–30, with the presentation of seven movies, hosted by TV interviewer Dave Karger and author William J. Mann, whose books include Wisecracker: The Life and Times of William Haines and Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood, 1910-1969. Among tonight's movies' Lgbt connections: Edward Albee, Tony Richardson, Evelyn Waugh, Tab Hunter, John Gielgud, Roddy McDowall, Linda Hunt, Harvey Fierstein, Rudolf Nureyev, Christopher Isherwood, Joel Grey, and Tommy Kirk. Update: Coincidentally, TCM's final 2017 Gay Pride celebration turned out to be held the evening before a couple of international events – and one non-event – demonstrated that despite noticeable progress in the last three decades, gay rights, even in the so-called “West,” still have a long way to go. In Texas, the state's – all-Republican – Supreme Court decided that married gays should be treated as separate and unequal. In »

- Andre Soares

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‘The Crown’: What It Takes to Play Royalty in an Age That Questions Their Worth

29 June 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Heavy is the head that wears the crown, but it’s not easy being the sibling of a monarch either.

On Netflix’s “The Crown,” Jared Harris and Vanessa Kirby play father and daughter royals, King George VI and Princess Margaret, both of whom had their fates changed by divorce. Today, their stories have been overshadowed by Queen Elizabeth II, who has reigned for more than 60 years. “The Crown” has dredged up their stories for a new generation.

Read More: Netflix’s ‘The Crown’: How Stephen Daldry Romanticized a Royal Wedding

Before ever tackling a role such as these though, most British actors have already formed some sort of an opinion about the Royal Family.

“That relationship [with the monarchy] has changed over time, and I think there is a conflict about that which is still ongoing,” Harris said in an interview with IndieWire. “What is the relevance of the Royal Family? »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Hollywood Studios' First Gay Romantic Drama Back on the Big Screen

24 June 2017 1:03 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Making Love': Groundbreaking romantic gay drama returns to the big screen As part of its Anniversary Classics series, Laemmle Theaters will be presenting Arthur Hiller's groundbreaking 1982 romantic drama Making Love, the first U.S. movie distributed by a major studio that focused on a romantic gay relationship. Michael Ontkean, Harry Hamlin, and Kate Jackson star. The 35th Anniversary Screening of Making Love will be held on Saturday, June 24 – it's Gay Pride month, after all – at 7:30 p.m. at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. in Beverly Hills. The movie will be followed by a Q&A session with Harry Hamlin, screenwriter Barry Sandler, and author A. Scott Berg, who wrote the “story” on which the film is based. 'Making Love' & What lies beneath In this 20th Century Fox release – Sherry Lansing was the studio head at the time – Michael Ontkean plays a »

- Andre Soares

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More Gay Stars and Directors and Screenwriters on TCM: From psychos and psychiatrists to surfers and stage mamas

22 June 2017 6:51 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

On the day a U.S. appeals court lifted an injunction that blocked a Mississippi “religious freedom” law – i.e., giving Christian extremists the right to discriminate against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, etc. – not to mention the publication of a Republican-backed health care bill targeting the poor, the sick, the elderly, and those with “pre-existing conditions” – which would include HIV-infected people, a large chunk of whom are gay and bisexual men, so the wealthy in the U.S. can get a massive tax cut, Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride or Lgbt Month celebration continues (into tomorrow morning, Thursday & Friday, June 22–23) with the presentation of movies by or featuring an eclectic – though seemingly all male – group: Montgomery Clift, Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, Dirk Bogarde, John Schlesinger, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Arthur Laurents, and Jerome Robbins. After all, one assumes that, rumors or no, the presence of Mercedes McCambridge in one »

- Andre Soares

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Cross-Post: Lillian Hellman’s Regina Giddens: The Theatre’s Original “Nasty Woman”

20 June 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Cynthia Nixon as Regina Giddens in Lillian Hellman’s “The Little Foxes”: Joan Marcus/littlefoxesbroadway.com

The following has been reposted from The Interval with the author’s permission.

When I set out to write a piece on “The Little Foxes,” I headed right to the Drama Book Shop in New York City, to browse and research all things Lillian Hellman. Shockingly, there were no biographies of her in stock or on order. She was not even included in the Drama Book Shop’s most basic book series outlining the lives of accomplished American playwrights. I perused Barnes and Noble and independent bookstores with large theatre sections, but all to no avail. The most recent Hellman biography (less than five years old and provocatively titled “A Difficult Woman”) was even hard to obtain on Amazon; I had to purchase it through a third party seller. Not only are Hellman biographies in short supply, so too are Hellman revivals. Her plays have only been brought back to Broadway six times total, as opposed to the 25 Broadway revivals for Arthur Miller, or the 31 Broadway revivals for Tennessee Williams. To this day, she has never won a Best Play or Best Revival of a Play Tony Award. The sixth and current Hellman revival is of her most acclaimed play, “The Little Foxes,” which is about the unconventional Southern matriarch Regina Giddens, who manipulates her brothers’ moneymaking scheme with grit, ambition, and business acumen.

Of course, Hellman was a fairly unconventional woman herself. Born into a Southern Jewish family, Hellman was, as a woman and a Jew, automatically placed in the periphery of society, twice over. Nevertheless, she grew up to become a popular playwright, spinning successful stories depicting strong women. Independent and outspoken, at the time of her first Broadway hit she was a divorcée engaged in a fairly public love affair with a married man. Hellman was even blacklisted in the McCarthy Era for refusing to cooperate with the Huac [House Un-American Activities Committee], instead famously claiming, “I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this year’s fashions.” But these things were part of her notoriety and celebrity appeal, not the cause of her downfall. Despite her apparently unladylike lifestyle, Hellman was adored throughout the middle of the 20th Century. Her reputation only became irreversibly tarnished in the 1970s, when a fellow female writer accused her of plagiarism. By the time of her death in 1984, this once celebrated woman had fallen into a state of semi-obscurity in comparison to her contemporaries.

A recent New York Times article by Jason Zinoman (in response to an article by Washington Post critic Peter Marks) questioned whether Hellman actually belonged in “the same elite club of 20th-century masters” as Miller and Williams. Zinoman concluded that Manhattan Theatre Club’s current revival of “Foxes” would be an opportunity for the piece to prove itself. (He neglected to mention that this Mtc production is the only revival of a play on Broadway this season that was written by a woman. Furthermore, it is the first time a woman has produced this play on Broadway; a woman has still never directed it.) It is absurd to think that nearly 80 years after “Foxes” debuted, the play is still fighting to prove its worth. For the record, reviews of the Mtc revival from The Washington Post, Variety, and The Hollywood Reporter described “Foxes” as “worthy of exalted rank in the American canon,” “astonishingly well-constructed,” and “too seldom revived on Broadway,” respectively. Even The New York Times review — albeit not by Zinoman — conceded that “Foxes” certainly “comes pretty close” to deserving “a place in the first rank of American theater.”

Curious to know how earlier productions of “Foxes” had been received by theatrical critics, I downloaded some reviews from The New York Times archives. Three Broadway revivals ago, a 1981 article by Frank Rich described Regina, the tour-de-force protagonist of “Foxes,” as a “malignant southern bitch-goddess.” The same paper that refused to print the full title of the play “The Motherfucker with the Hat” in 2011 had no problem printing the word “bitch” 30 years earlier. These days, the word “bitch” is used fairly casually (and it is certainly not likely to be considered as potentially offensive as “motherfucker”), but it is still a derogative, gendered word for which there is no male equivalent. “Motherfucker” might well be the next closest thing.

A 2014 article by Justin Peters on the Times’ “profanity policy” quoted Standards Editor Philip B. Corbett, who explained that Times writers “are prepared to make exceptions if the use of a vulgarity is newsworthy or essential to the story, or if avoiding it would deprive readers of crucial information.” The position of standards editor had not yet been created at the Times when Frank Rich published his 1981 review, but the profanity policy was based on rules from the paper’s style guide at the time. Was it “essential” to refer to Regina as a “bitch”? Would readers have been “deprived crucial information” if another word had been used instead? Not likely, considering that Brooks Atkinson managed to review the original production for the Times back in 1939 without resorting to profanity (although the character of Regina was described there as “heartless,” “ambitious,” “avaricious,” “malevolent,” “calculating,” “hateful,” “rapacious,” “cunning,” and “odious.” Synonyms for bitch, perhaps?).

Just as there is no male equivalent for “bitch,” there seems to have historically been no real equivalent critical response to similarly strong, complex female characters in plays by the men who made up Zinoman’s “elite club of 20th-century masters.” In the Times’ 1945 review of the original “Glass Menagerie,” critic Lewis Nichols is almost an apologist for Amanda, to whom he frequently refers not by name but as “The Mother.” He sympathetically describes her as “a blowsy, impoverished woman living on memories,” and “trying to do the best she can for her children.” Brooks Atkinson’s Times review of the original 1947 “A Streetcar Named Desire” is similarly apologetic. He glosses over the darker sides of Blanche’s personality, tactfully considering her to be “one of the dispossessed whose experience has unfitted her for reality.” Both Amanda and Blanche, creations of the male imagination, are given far more credit and understanding than Regina. Granted, these women do not appear to be quite as greedy as Regina; Amanda wants security for herself, through her children, while Blanche wants to return to her glorified past. But it’s worth keeping in mind that Regina wants to make money in order to go to Chicago, where she envisions leading a freer, more cosmopolitan life.

Perhaps a more fitting comparison would be to “The Crucible,” which features the selfish, destructive Abigail (though even she can be viewed empathetically if one believes that she acted out of desperate love for John Proctor). However, there is barely any mention of the character Abigail — and none at all by name — in the original 1953 New York Times review of “The Crucible,” written, once again, by Brooks Atkinson. The actress who played her is only briefly referenced, as “the malicious town hussy,” one in a long list of supporting performers. In contrast, Ben Brantley observed how the “frustrated lust in [Abigail’s] condemnation of her fellow townspeople [turned] self-serving duplicity into self-deluding mania,” and devoted multiple paragraphs to that character in his review of the 2002 Broadway revival.

“Malicious” and “hussy” are certainly words that fit right in with the sexist criticism of Regina Giddens, but they are a far cry from the litany of negative barbs ascribed by Brooks Atkinson to Regina. It’s as though it were easier in this case for Atkinson to take the strong, rebellious woman out of the equation, erasing the love triangle at the play’s core. Isn’t that “depriving readers of crucial information,” more so than profanity? Ought we give Atkinson credit for not altogether excluding Regina from his “Foxes” review, or should we criticize his seemingly limited ability to recognize when unladylike women are central to the plot of a play (and only when the playwright is female too)? Either way, the bar seems pretty low.

It was only when I left off scouring mid-20th century theatrical reviews of plays by men and went further back in time, to Scandinavia in the late 19th century, that I discovered a true equivalent to the critical response to Regina. The playwright was Henrik Ibsen and the central character in question was Nora Helmer (ironically, there is a new sequel to “A Doll’s House” on Broadway this season; it was far better received by critics than was the original source material). When “A Doll’s House” first premiered in Denmark in December of 1879, critics attacked Nora’s moral character. As archived and translated by the National Library of Norway, the Danish newspaper Illustreret Tidende wrote that “her faults were many; she was used to making herself guilty of many small untruths, she taught the children falsehood, she was imprudent and wasteful; her ideal nature she kept hidden, almost willfully.” Such intense scrutiny of a woman’s behavior feels more suited to the muckraking journalists of the early 20th Century, or of 21st century Republican political ads targeting opponents, than theatrical criticism.

In contrast, a century later, “A Dolls House” had become an established classic and Liv Ullmann was described as giving “a rich, many-layered performance that has about it the quality of a moral force,” in Clive Barnes’ review of the 1975 Broadway production. Critics in 20th century America didn’t judge Nora as harshly as they had when the play originally debuted, and yet they seemed to apply those 19th century standards to Regina Giddens in “The Little Foxes.” It would seem that the harsh response to Regina’s character was more in line with the critical response to Nora in 1879 than it was to reviews of Nora, or Blanche DuBois, or Amanda Wingfield, or any other strong female character in a mid- to late-20th century production of a play written by a male playwright.

But it is not my intention to throw shade at 19th century Danish critics, nor at The New York Times. They aren’t the only ones fond of derogative words when it comes to Regina. Elizabeth Hardwick of The New York Review of Books called her a “greedy bitch” in reference to the 1967 “Foxes” revival. While she acknowledged that Regina and her brothers (her fellow co-conspirators in the financial scheme) were “the very spirit of ruthless Capitalism,” Hardwick used the far weaker word “coarse” to describe the brothers, in parallel sentence structure to Regina’s “bitch” adjectives. It is as though she is implying that ruthlessly capitalistic men are coarse while ruthlessly capitalistic women are greedy bitches. It seems Regina’s unladylike behavior has historically perturbed some female theatre critics as well as male. And lest any readers think that the current “Foxes” revival has escaped the clutches of such language, Deadline’s Jeremy Gerard used the phrase “queen bitch” to describe Regina (while simply referring to her brothers as “greedy”) in his review from April 2017.

To be fair, 21st century critics have spent more time pondering Regina’s psychology and motivations than in the past, when most of the character’s (limited) praise had to do solely with how great actresses played her. In 1939, Atkinson grudgingly admitted Regina “has to be respected for the keenness of her mind and the force of her character,” but attributed all the credit to Tallulah Bankhead’s superior acting skills. In 1981, Rich praised Hellman for “throw[ing] her actors the prime red meat of bristling language,” and appreciated Elizabeth Taylor’s ability to find the humor in Regina. In the 1990s, Ben Brantley proclaimed that despite her horrific behavior, “[f]ew heroines of American theater are half as much fun as Regina Giddens.”

By 2010, critics seemed slightly more aware of the depths yet to be discussed in Regina’s character. Brantley briefly noted “a bottomless hunger that goes beyond her articulated desires,” in Elizabeth Marvel’s 2010 interpretation of Regina, and compared her to a Wall Street executive, though the majority of his review focused on an interpretation that infantilized Marvel’s Regina, depicting her as a “presexual, premoral 2-year-old, a squalling, grabby little girl.” New Yorker critic and 2017 Pulitzer Prize winner Hilton Als wrote an analysis of Regina that had sarcasm practically dripping off the page like wet ink: “Life can be hard on a privileged white woman. Just look at Regina Giddens and all the drama that Lillian Hellman forces her to cope with,” he wrote. Perhaps despite himself, however, Als revealed he occasionally sympathized with Regina, stating that “one feels a pang, every once in a while, for Regina’s dark hopes. How far could she — or any woman — really go in a small Southern town in 1900?” He even suggested that a successful revival, unlike the one he was reviewing, might “marr[y] contemporary feminist politics to Hellman’s insight into the ways in which class and race and need can eat away at an ambitious woman.”

It wasn’t until 2016, when Peter Marks detected “a humanizing rationale” in that “gorgeous enigma,” proclaiming Regina to be “less than a hero but more than a villain,” that the character really found nuanced understanding. For the most part, the reviewers this spring seemed to agree. There were, of course, a fair amount of articles trying to heighten the competition between Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon, who alternate nightly in the lead role of Regina and the supporting role of her sister-in-law Birdie. For reference, I refer you to headlines such as the oddly worded “Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon Are Doing What ‘Men Do All the Time’ in ‘The Little Foxes’” or the erroneous “Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon were both up for the lead role Broadway’s ‘The Little Foxes.’ They both got it.” In truth, Linney was offered the role and she suggested that her friend Nixon come on board to share it with her. It would’ve been nice to see more headlines focusing on and commending their friendship, as opposed to the supposed drama, between these two respected actresses.

Regina, at least, seems to be getting her due in this revival, despite Deadline’s “queen bitch” name calling. Variety’s Marilyn Stasio described Regina as “one of the strongest female characters in all of American drama,” and, “a spirited modern woman cruelly restrained by the social conventions of her time.” Entertainment Weekly’s Isabella Biedenharn praised Laura Linney as Regina for “allow[ing] the audience to feel the pain of knowing what she could have accomplished, the deals she could have closed, if she were born a man.” These depths and dichotomies were explored even further in Alexis Soloski’s insightful New York Times review of the current revival. She wittily opened her piece with the observation that “Regina Giddens is a flower of Southern womanhood. That flower is a Venus flytrap.” Soloski went on to call Regina “one of the stage’s great antiheroines,” noting how her behavior stems from the fact that she is a woman with “greater ambition and less opportunity to satisfy it than any of her kin.” Soloski did not gloss over Regina’s questionable behavior, but she urged readers to “admire her flair and her grit,” even while “loath[ing] her politics and her methods.”

When I saw “Foxes” back in April, I was struck by an exchange between Regina and her brother Ben, in which Ben tells her she’d “get farther with a smile.” How could that line not stand out, given all of the memes, tweets, late night comedy sketches, and articles all over the world devoted to discussions of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s smile through the 2016 presidential campaign? The New York Times must have been intrigued by this exchange as well. They created a video feature titled “How Laura Linney and Cynthia Nixon Smile at Their Enemies.” In the video, Nixon says she considers the ensuing smile that Regina gives her brother Ben to be “almost a perversion of a smile. It’s a smile of hate.”

Times critic Soloski called Regina’s smile “weaponized” and considered her ultimately victorious. Unlike similarly formidable theatrical antiheroines Clytemnestra and Lady Macbeth, who were also willing “to sacrifice some essential femininity, rejecting wifely and maternal instincts” in order to pursue their desires, Regina’s “comeuppance never comes.” She actually gets what she wants. As Soloski wryly stated, the play “leaves her finally in command of her body and her fortune and her future. That’ll get her farther than a smile.”

But how far have we come since 1879, 1939, 1967, or 1981, if we are still calling ambitious female characters “bitches”? If our most revered papers still crudely and unnecessarily objectify women’s bodies in theater reviews and judge respected female directors for being “too serious”? If men are still primarily the ones writing, directing, and reviewing a majority of plays about women that make it to Broadway?

To take things outside the arguably narrow sphere of theater, how far have we come since Hellman’s Huac blacklisting America if it is still acceptable for male politicians to interrupt (#manterrupt) one of the few female senators during multiple Senate Intelligence Committee hearings, and to silence their female peers in congress because “she was warned, she was given an explanation, nevertheless she persisted”? How far have we come if we as a society call female presidential candidates “nasty women” who need to smile more and who deserve to be locked up for minor email scandals while we permit men to commit treason many times over while remaining heads of state?

Not very far indeed.

Cross-Post: Lillian Hellman’s Regina Giddens: The Theatre’s Original “Nasty Woman” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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‘What a Beautiful Day with Beautiful People’: Lindsay Lohan Attends Friend’s Wedding in Iceland

18 June 2017 6:42 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Iceland got a little hotter on Saturday, when Lindsay Lohan made a visit to the country to attend a friend’s wedding.

The 30-year-old actress – who announced on Monday that she would be joining the cast of Rupert Grint‘s British TV comedy Sick Note for its second season — was one of the many stars partying the night away at the Borealis Hotel in Úlfljótsvan, where U.S. tech mogul and author Oliver Luckett married his partner, music supervisor and chef Scott Guinn.

Lohan looked elegant in a cream dress as she posed with the happy couple. She also shared »

- Dave Quinn

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The Incomparable Rose Hartman: I Shot Andy Warhol... David Bowie... and Bianca Jagger on a Horse

17 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

If Andy were still strutting about nowadays, he might just tweak his "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes" to "in the future, everyone will be starring in her own documentary or reality TV series."

The latest beneficiary of such a crowd-funded, ego-boosting journey into her past travails is the prickly “Tasmanian Devil of Photography,” octogenarian Rose Hartman. You who are of a certain age, especially those of you with fashionista leanings, will recall this salty soul's snapshots or at least those who were apprehended by her lens: Kate Moss, Steve Rubell, Elizabeth Taylor, Liza Minnelli, Truman Capote, Lenny Kravitz, and Linda Evangelista. Her candid images were mostly taken at society functions, discos, and fashion shows.

As Hartman insists, "I don’t want a posed face ever."

Her initial claim to fame, according to director Otis Mass’s to-the-point documentary, is that Hartman was the first to shoot »

- Brandon Judell

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Lindsay Lohan Is Returning to TV, and This Could Be the Low-Key Comeback Vehicle She Needs

15 June 2017 7:29 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Lindsay Lohan is heading back to television, but she’s doing it across the pond.

The “Mean Girls” star has landed a role on “Sick Note,” a British comedy series that will air on Sky Atlantic and streaming service Now TV sometime this year. The show has already been renewed for a second season, which is when Lohan is slated to show up.

Read More: ‘Mean Girls 2’: Lindsay Lohan Has Written a Treatment and Hopes Tina Fey Can make Time for It

Sick Note” stars Rupert Grint as Daniel Glass, whose life hasn’t been going so well lately. He’s struggling to care about his dead-end job with his demanding boss Kenny West (Don Johnson) and is also in failing relationship. It all comes to a head when he’s diagnosed with esophageal cancer, supposedly a fatal case. Upon learning the news, everyone begins to treat Daniel better, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Lindsay Lohan Is Returning to TV, and This Could Be the Low-Key Comeback Vehicle She Needs

15 June 2017 7:29 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Lindsay Lohan is heading back to television, but she’s doing it across the pond.

The “Mean Girls” star has landed a role on “Sick Note,” a British comedy series that will air on Sky Atlantic and streaming service Now TV sometime this year. The show has already been renewed for a second season, which is when Lohan is slated to show up.

Read More: ‘Mean Girls 2’: Lindsay Lohan Has Written a Treatment and Hopes Tina Fey Can make Time for It

Sick Note” stars Rupert Grint as Daniel Glass, whose life hasn’t been going so well lately. He’s struggling to care about his dead-end job with his demanding boss Kenny West (Don Johnson) and is also in failing relationship. It all comes to a head when he’s diagnosed with esophageal cancer, supposedly a fatal case. Upon learning the news, everyone begins to treat Daniel better, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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TVLine Items: Lindsay Lohan Joins UK Series, Cold Justice Premiere and More

12 June 2017 4:16 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Lindsay Lohan is headed to the small screen — across the pond.

The Mean Girls actress has joined the Season 2 cast of the British comedy Sick Note, starring Rupert Grint (Harry Potter), Nick Frost (Into the Badlands) and Don Johnson, our sister site Deadline reports.

RelatedAmanda Bynes Planning Return to TV — Watch First Interview in Four Years

The series — which begins airing its first season this fall on UK broadcaster Sky 1 — follows Daniel Glass (Grint), an insurance rep who is wrongly misdiagnosed with a terminal illness and then decides to hide the truth from his colleagues, friends and family. Lohan »

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Mindy Newell: Wonder Woman? Okay, I’ll Chime In!

12 June 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Well, everybody else here is talking about Wonder Woman, so I guess it’s my turn. Caution: there may be S-p-o-i-l-e-r-s ahead! (Especially my sixth bullet, below.)

It’s been said before, and I’ll say it again. Gal Gadot is to Ww as Christopher Reeve was to Superman. Her portrayal of the Amazon leaves an indelible print upon the character; it’s as if Zeus did indeed exhale, not upon a figure of clay, but upon a two-dimensional comic book form drawn of pen and ink, allowing her to step off the flat page and into the three-dimensional world, granting her life and all the depth and breadth of humanity. Chris Pine’s Steve Trevor is not some ineffectual weenie who somehow got through basic training, nor is he some steroid-enhanced muscle-bound moose. Nor is he the male version of a 1950s Lois Lane, mooning after love. Nor is »

- Mindy Newell

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