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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 264 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


When Mike Nichols' Early Films Hit Theaters for the First Time

22 November 2014 7:58 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

A rapturous review greeted 34-year-old Mike Nichols, who made his big-screen directorial debut with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. "The screen has never held a more shattering and indelible drama," read The Hollywood Reporter's June 1966 review, which deemed the title a "masterpiece" in its headline and praised the "stunning bow" of the young helmer. Nichols followed up Woolf with an equally acclaimed title, The Graduate, and without the spotlight of Woolf stars Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, THR appraised the director's maturing style. "Nichols aims eye and ear to the hilarious inanities lurking in the

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- Erik Hayden

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Mike Nichols: 5 Must-See Movies

20 November 2014 3:40 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

A movie by Mike Nichols is typically an elegant, unruffled ride across a smooth, even chilly surface - the movie's value glints upward from beneath that ice. The director, who died Wednesday at 83, over the years pared down any attempt at visual flourish - The Graduate, his groundbreaking early film that remains his most famous, is probably also one of his flashiest. What fired him up, what he bored down into, was the intellectual germ (or gem) of the story. This meant that he was willing to consider anything for his camera: erotic werewolves (Wolf), World War II (Catch-22), philandering »

- Tom Gliatto, @gliattoT

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TCM to remember Mike Nichols with film tribute

20 November 2014 1:53 PM, PST | ChannelGuideMag | See recent ChannelGuideMag news »

Famed director Mike Nichols passed away yesterday at the age of 83. One of the few artists to have earned Oscar, Tony, Emmy and Grammy accolades, Nichols will be remembered by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) with a three-film tribute on Dec. 6, featuring Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), The Graduate (1967) and Carnal Knowledge (1971). TCM Remembers Mike Nichols — Saturday, Dec. 6 (All Times Et) 8pm: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? – starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Sandy Dennis and George Segal 10:30pm: The Graduate – starring Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross, Murray Hamilton, William Daniels and … Continue reading →

The post TCM to remember Mike Nichols with film tribute appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine. »

- Jeff Pfeiffer

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A celebration of legendary director Mike Nichols and his masterpiece-studded career

20 November 2014 1:25 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

If I had to make a list of the ten film directors who I think most influenced my own standards of what filmmaking can be and should be, Mike Nichols would be on that list, if only for the first two films he made. And it may seem strange to say that I admire how he survived making those masterworks, but early success can destroy even the greatest talent because of the expectations it creates, and Nichols somehow managed it in a way that many other talented people have not. That is not to say that the rest of his work is not worth that kind of consideration and discussion. It's just that Nichols came out of the gate with two genuine, no-debate masterpieces, two films that crackle with life, two films that are so visually adept that they are humbling, two films packed with performances that go beyond good »

- Drew McWeeny

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Direction and Misdirection: An Appreciation of Mike Nichols, 1931–2014

20 November 2014 12:45 PM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

If Mike Nichols ever produced anything as banal as a résumé, it would have looked highly suspicious, the humblebrag of a con man. He did too many things, they were too far-flung, and he was too successful at all of them. There was the career in sketch comedy with Elaine May, circa 1958 to 1962; they had three Top 40 albums and a Broadway hit and then broke up. Next came the switch to stage directing, which netted nine Tonys, from 1964 (Barefoot in the Park) to 2012 (Death of a Salesman). When he defected to Hollywood in 1966, it was cover-of-Newsweek news; soon he owned a local subspeciality, the superstar prestige pic, puppeteering everyone from Elizabeth Taylor to Cher to (inevitably) Meryl into Oscar-bait performances. Was he also a classical-radio DJ? Yes. A Broadway producer? Yes. (He made a fortune on Annie.) An amateur wigmaster? Certainly — he lost »

- Jesse Green

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Mike Nichols Movies: 18 Essential Films You Should Watch Right Now

20 November 2014 8:30 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Few directors can be said to have changed the way films are made, but Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday at 83, was one of them. His first film, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966), ended decades of Hollywood censorship of adult content and freed the movies for mature language and subject matter ever after. His second film, "The Graduate," was the first serious mainstream movie to feature a rock soundtrack (spawning Simon and Garfunkel's hit "Mrs. Robinson") and, through its casting of Dustin Hoffman, expanded Hollywood's notion of what a leading man ought to look and sound like.

Nichols wasn't born in America (he and his family escaped from Nazi Germany when he was a child), but he was one of the best chroniclers of contemporary America -- its politics, its aspirations, its dreams, its aristocracy, and its successes and failures -- in movies. His youth in Manhattan as the son »

- Gary Susman

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Movie News: Oscar-Winning Director Mike Nichols Dies at 83

20 November 2014 7:13 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

New York City – He was an immigrant kid from Germany who directed the most American of stage plays and films. Mike Nichols uplifted the culture with his art, and along the way won the famed Egot – Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony. Nichols passed away suddenly at his home. He was 83.

Nichols brought the Chicago improvisation sensibility to his work – he was part of the original Compass Players of the University of Chicago, the group that morphed into The Second City. He achieved Beatle-like fame in the early 1960s with his comedy act Nichols and May, paired with Elaine May. But his destiny was behind the camera, and after making a huge splash on Broadway, conquered the film world with the one-two triumphs of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and the classic “The Graduate.”

Mike Nichols in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: Los Angeles Times

Mikhail Igor Peschkowsky was Nichols birth name, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Rip Mike Nichols

20 November 2014 6:25 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Mike Nichols, the Oscar winning director of The Graduate and the storied star of Broadway, passed away Wednesday evening. He was 83.

Nichols is one of the famous few Egot winners, having started his career as a comedy performer with an improv comedy troupe and in a comedy duo along with Elaine May. His Broadway career as a director started skyrocketing in the ’60s when he directed Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park, The Odd Couple, The Knack and Luv.

And yet his early film career in the late ’60s, including Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? with Elizabeth Taylor and The Graduate, the movie that made Dustin Hoffman a star, helped shaped modern cinema. The making of these films, as documented in Mark Harris’s Pictures at a Revolution, helped usher in New Hollywood and signaled a shifting tide in the way movies are made.

He went on to make such classics as Silkwood, »

- Brian Welk

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Breaking News! Director Mike Nichols Dead At Age 83

20 November 2014 5:20 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

Director Mike Nichols, one of the most influential artists of his generation, has passed away at age 83. Nichols is one of the few people who could claim to be the winner of the Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony awards. Nichols rose to fame with his comedy act in which he teamed with Elaine May. He made a successful transition into feature film with his 1966 screen adaptation of Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?", a triumphant film debut that starred Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. The following year he won the Oscar for his 1967 classic "The Graduate". Other films over the decades included "The Birdcage", "Working Girl", "Charlie Wilson's War" and "Silkwood". His plays include "Barefoot in the Park", "Death of a Salesman" and "The Odd Couple". 

Burton and Taylor on the set of Nichols' 1966 triumph "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"

 

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- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Oscar-winning director Mike Nichols dies: His career in pictures

20 November 2014 5:19 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Mike Nichols, the Oscar-winning director behind The Graduate and Closer, has passed away at the age of 83.

The Berlin-born filmmaker began his showbiz career in improv comedy before teaming up with Elaine May and heading to Broadway for the show An Evening With Mike Nichols and Elaine May. The duo split in the '60s and Nichols moved into movie directing with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?.

In a career spanning 18 feature films, Nichols worked with A-list stars such as Elizabeth Taylor, Meryl Streep, Dustin Hoffman and Tom Hanks. He is also a member of the illustrious Egot club having won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Award.

Digital Spy looks back at Nichols's film career in pictures.

Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf? (1966)

The Graduate (1967)

Catch 22 (1970)

Carnal Knowledge (1971)

Silkwood (1983)

Working Girl (1988)

Postcards from the Edge (1990)

Regarding Henry (1991)

Wolf (1994)

The Birdcage (1996)

Primary Colours (1998)

Closer (2004)

Charlie Wilson's War (2007) »

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Oscar & Tony Winning Director Mike Nichols Dead At 83

20 November 2014 4:41 AM, PST | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Legendary film and theater director, writer and producer Mike Nichols has passed away. An Oscar winner for 1967′s seminal The Graduate, he also was nominated for such films as Working Girl, Silkwood and Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? For his stage work, he amassed 10 Tony Awards including as director for such plays as Barefoot In The Park, The Odd Couple, The Prisoner Of Second Avenue and Death Of A Salesman; and as producer of Annie and The Real Thing.

William Goldman said there were two great American film directors—Elia Kazan and Mike Nichols,” said Broadway producer Emanuel Azenberg, who co-produced Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing with Nichols, who also staged ythe play’s Tony-winning Broadway edition with Glenn Close and Jeremy Irons. “I think that’s true. He was a giant who could convince people to be better than they were.”

Nichols died suddenly late Wednesday night »

- The Deadline Team

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Mike Nichols, ‘Graduate’ Director, Dead At 83

20 November 2014 4:15 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Mike Nichols, the award-winning director of Broadway and movies, died Wednesday in Manhattan at the age of 83. Nichols was the husband of ABC News anchor Diane Sawyer. A spokesman for ABC said the cause was cardiac arrest.

Photos: Mike Nichols’ Life and Career in Photos

Nichols is one of few people to win an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony — achieving so-called Egot status. His first two feature helming efforts — the caustic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” in 1966 and 1967’s satirical “The Graduate” — launched a prodigious movie career. But before ever stepping behind the camera, he was already part of a successful comedy duo with Elaine May and had helmed a string of hit stage shows.

Nichols’ background in improvisational, satirical comedy informed many of his films, which often started out as comedies and ended up as acerbic ruminations on American relationships. Directing material by playwrights, screenwriters »

- Terry Flores

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The Graduate director Mike Nichols dies, aged 83

20 November 2014 4:08 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director Mike Nichols has died at the age of 83.

Nichols won the Best Director Oscar for his 1967 comedy drama The Graduate, which starred Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft.

A note from president of ABC News James Goldston to staff confirmed that Nichols, the husband of former ABC World News anchor Diane Sawyer, died suddenly on Wednesday evening (November 19).

"In a triumphant career that spanned over six decades, Mike created some of the most iconic works of American film, television and theatre - an astonishing canon ranging from The Graduate, Working Girl, and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf to Closer, Charlie Wilson's War, Annie, Spamalot, The Birdcage, and Angels in America," Goldston said.

"He was a true visionary, winning the highest honors in the arts for his work as a director, writer, producer and comic and was one of a tiny few to win the Egot - an Emmy, a Grammy, »

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Oscar-Winning Director Mike Nichols Dies at 83

20 November 2014 1:32 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

On Tina Fey's wonderfully weird "30 Rock," there was a running joke about how the megalomaniacal star Tracy Jordan (played, somewhat confusingly, by Tracy Morgan), was on the quest for achieving the mythical Egot, meaning he wanted to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony. He wanted to conquer the whole of the entertainment industry. Few have achieved this nearly mythical goal. But director Mike Nichols did. And today, Mike Nichols died suddenly at the age of 83, leaving behind a staggering body of work and, yes, lots and lots of awards.

Nichols was born in Germany in 1931 before immigrating to this country in 1938, when Nazis started arresting Jews in Germany. (He went with his brother and met his father in America; his mother escaped later through Italy.) His father was a doctor in New York City and Nichols lived a tony lifestyle near Central Park. (He also, presumably, got to »

- Drew Taylor

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Honey, time marches on and eventually you realize it is marchin' across your blog.

19 November 2014 5:00 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Stereogum interviews musician Tunde Adebimpe, the groom from Rachel Getting Married. He says Paul Thomas Anderson (!!!) was originally going to play his part.

Dissolve the Russo brothers who did such a great job with Captain America Winter Soldier may be staying with Marvel unto infinity. And Infinity Wars

BadAss Digest kind of a dick move that DC announced a Flash movie shortly after The Flash series opened to great numbers but with a different actor. The star of CW's Arrow objects

Geek x Girls Dance off from Guardians of the Galaxy takes a detour with Lee Pace

Coming Soon Interstellar prequel comic

/Film 30 movies coming to TV from worst to best ideas

THR Madonna isn't done directing Her next project Ade: A Love Story has a writer

Mnpp Lmao! Which is hotter, Andrew Garfield or...?

Film School Rejects shares 7 movie scenes where actors imitated other actors. Amusing but why no ladies? »

- NATHANIEL R

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Listen: On 'Sabrina' and the Evolution of Audrey Hepburn

18 November 2014 6:00 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In 1954, Audrey Hepburn charmed moviegoers as a chauffeur's daughter in Billy Wilder's "Sabrina," an early example of the iconic screen star's bewitching blend of wit, style and charisma. The latest podcast in film critic Karina Longworth's You Must Remember This series, which regularly explores forgotten Hollywood backstories and mythology, examines Hepburn's emerging star persona during the days of "Sabrina"— along with some spicy behind-the-scenes goings-on involving costars William Holden and Humphrey Bogart. Below, listen to Longworth's 35-minute podcast, which is distributed by Infinite Guest from American Public Media. Follow the podcast on Twitter via @RememberThisPod. Past highlights include Longworth's takes on iconic screen pairings, from Bogie and Bacall to Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift. Her well-articulated and unusual insights into movie history make for a great long-form listen. »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Where Lifetime Went Wrong With the Aaliyah Movie (and What It Could Learn Going Forward)

17 November 2014 1:25 PM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

No one expects much from a Lifetime movie. But as the cable network continues to air biopics about celebrities who have experienced tragedy, death, or tragic deaths — Brittany Murphy, Anna Nicole Smith, Elizabeth Taylor, and, next year, Whitney Houston —  it's hard not to experience the same sine curve of interest and massive disappointment every time. This weekend's Lifetime movie about the life of Aaliyah was the latest example. It was messy from the get-go: The movie’s original star, singer and Disney star Zendaya, dropped out because she was uncomfortable not having the approval of Aaliyah’s family, which was not happy that the film wasn’t getting “a movie-studio release,” according to Jomo Hankerson, Aaliyah's cousin and president of her label, Blackground Records.Aaliyah: The Princess of R&B was a bland reenactment of the singer’s short life, a soulless retelling of familiar stories that lacked the ability »

- Lindsey Weber

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Brooke Shields's Bombshell of the Day: Her Calvin Klein Jeans Still Fit!

17 November 2014 12:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Brooke Shields tells all about her celebrity romances, her mom and her crazy life as a child star. Subscribe now for instant access to our exclusive People cover story and excerpt from her new book.Brooke Shields caused a sensation back in 1980, when she modeled a pair of Calvin Klein jeans and proclaimed, "Nothing comes between me and my Calvins." Thirty-four years later, Shields writes about the infamous commercial in her new memoir about her mom and her extraordinary life, There Was a Little Girl. It turns out the star has the famous blue jeans in storage. "I do have them in [my] archives, »

- Liz McNeil, @lizmcneil

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Brooke Shields's Bombshell of the Day: Her Calvin Klein Jeans Still Fit!

17 November 2014 12:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Brooke Shields tells all about her celebrity romances, her mom and her crazy life as a child star. Subscribe now for instant access to our exclusive People cover story and excerpt from her new book.Brooke Shields caused a sensation back in 1980, when she modeled a pair of Calvin Klein jeans and proclaimed, "Nothing comes between me and my Calvins." Thirty-four years later, Shields writes about the infamous commercial in her new memoir about her mom and her extraordinary life, There Was a Little Girl. It turns out the star has the famous blue jeans in storage. "I do have them in [my] archives, »

- Liz McNeil, @lizmcneil

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Brooke Shields's Bombshell of the Day: Michael Jackson Was 'Terrified' of Dating

15 November 2014 12:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Brooke Shields tells all about her celebrity romances, her mom and her crazy life as a child star. Subscribe now for instant access to our exclusive People cover story and excerpt from her new book.They were close from the moment they met. When Brooke Shields first met Michael Jackson at the age of 13, she says, "We were like two little kids." "From the day we met, we saw something of ourselves in each other," says the star, 49, who opens up about her history of celeb romances in her new memoir about her mom, There Was a Little Girl. "We felt really safe. »

- Liz McNeil, @lizmcneil

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