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Night Passage — Die Uhr ist abgelaufen

It’s the great Anthony Mann-James Stewart western that Mann didn’t direct: Stewart goes it alone, over-filling a good western idea with ‘cute’ scenes and conservative messages Mann had no use for. But it’s an exciting picture, and one of co-star Audie Murphy’s best — and it’s the first feature in the splendid oversized format known as Technirama.

Night Passage

Blu-ray

Explosive Media (De)

1957 / color / 2:35 widescreen / 90 min. / available at Amazon.de / Die Uhr ist abgelaufen /Street Date August 10, 2017 / Eur 17,99

Starring: James Stewart, Audie Murphy, Dan Duryea, Dianne Foster, Elaine Stewart, Brandon De Wilde, Jay C. Flippen, Herbert Anderson, Robert J. Wilke, Hugh Beaumont, Jack Elam, Olive Carey, Ellen Corby, Chuck Roberson.

Cinematography: William Daniels

Film Editor: Sherman Todd

Original Music: Dimitri Tiomkin

Written by Borden Chase

Produced by Aaron Rosenberg

Directed by James Neilson

Universal-International didn’t spare the production values for their big-screen western Night Passage.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tallinn Film Review: ‘Asphyxia’

Tallinn Film Review: ‘Asphyxia’
On the international stage and on the festival circuit, Iranian cinema is not immediately associated with genre. The impish, richly ambiguous films of Abbas Kiarostami and the humanist social dramas of Asghar Farhadi have loomed largest in terms of defining the national canon. But while Fereydoun Jeyrani’s “Asphyxia” — a contemporary Iranian take on classic film noir and Gothic horror — doesn’t seem like an obvious hybrid at first, it ultimately makes a compelling case for itself: As the movie progresses, it becomes thrillingly clear that the cruel gender politics of those sinister genres can map themselves in mutually illuminating ways onto an inquisitive critique of female oppression in contemporary Iran.

Still, “Asphyxia” is, first and foremost, an accessible, entertainingly blackhearted, unapologetically Hitchcockian thriller, with a social subtext lurking for those who look. It also manages the tricky business of plausibly updating its throwback genres while keeping the aesthetic — here shot in whispery, shadowy black-and-white
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool: the tragic life of Hollywood sensation Gloria Grahame

She starred with Humphrey Bogart and James Stewart. But Gloria Grahame refused to bow to Hollywood sexism and was driven out. Frank Cottrell-Boyce on a new film about her finding love and a second life with a chaotic Liverpool family

In the late 1970s, Peter Turner was a young actor living in digs in Primrose Hill. One of his fellow lodgers in the London flat was Gloria Grahame – you know, the girl who couldn’t say no in Oklahoma!, the wayward small-town floozy in It’s a Wonderful Life.

By the time she met Peter, she was playing Sadie in a production of Somerset Maugham’s Rain at the Watford Palace. “She asked to borrow a shirt,” he says. “Then she needed a fiver. It escalated from there.” The couple began an on-off affair that seemed to dwindle to nothing – until late 1981. “Tuesday 29 September,” says Peter, embarking on a tale
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Reviews George Cukor’s The Philadelphia Story [Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review]

A prime specimen of the classic Hollywood Golden Age studio system firing on all cylinders. A beloved romantic comedy presented in a definitive edition for the enjoyment of longtime fans that also sets it up for discovery by a new generation. The crucial hit that restored Katharine Hepburn’s faltering career and launched her into legendary status as one of the greatest movie stars of all time. A fascinating story that weaves themes of social class, gender roles, media sensationalism and relationship tensions with timeless wit and flawless delivery. There are many angles by which a viewer can approach The Philadelphia Story and come away with heartfelt appreciation of this new release by the Criterion Collection.

For those unfamiliar with the plot, as the title implies, The Philadelphia Story is set in a wealthy suburban enclave on the outskirts of that city. Tracy Lord, the oldest daughter of a high-society
See full article at CriterionCast »

William Frye, Agent, Producer and Hollywood Raconteur, Dies at 96

William Frye, a man about town in Hollywood who produced General Electric Theater and Boris Karloff's Thriller for television as well as films including The Trouble With Angels and Airport 1975, has died. He was 96.

Frye died Nov. 3 of natural causes at his home in Palm Desert, Calif., according to an obituary placed in the Los Angeles Times.

Frye worked with and became dear friends with the likes of Cary Grant, Ronald Colman, Ronald Reagan, Irene Dunn, Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Loretta Young, Rosalind Russell, Bob Hope and Jimmy Stewart.

The producer also was close...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

William Frye, Agent, Producer and Hollywood Raconteur, Dies at 96

William Frye, Agent, Producer and Hollywood Raconteur, Dies at 96
William Frye, a man about town in Hollywood who produced General Electric Theater and Boris Karloff's Thriller for television as well as films including The Trouble With Angels and Airport 1975, has died. He was 96.

Frye died Nov. 3 of natural causes at his home in Palm Desert, Calif., according to an obituary placed in the Los Angeles Times.

Frye worked with and became dear friends with the likes of Cary Grant, Ronald Colman, Ronald Reagan, Irene Dunne, Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Loretta Young, Rosalind Russell, Bob Hope and Jimmy Stewart.

The producer also was close...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Annette Bening Set for Museum of the Moving Image Salute, Willem Dafoe Named Sbiff Cinema Vanguard, and Many More

Annette Bening Set for Museum of the Moving Image Salute, Willem Dafoe Named Sbiff Cinema Vanguard, and Many More
As awards season takes over Hollywood, keep up with all the ins, outs, and big accolades with our bi-weekly Awards Roundup column.

Annette Bening will be honored by Museum of the Moving Image at its 31st annual Salute on December 13 in New York. The news was announced by Michael Barker and Ivan L. Lustig, Co-Chairmen of the Museum’s Board of Trustees. The evening will feature cocktails, dinner, and an award presentation, featuring clips from Bening’s career introduced by her friends and colleagues.

Barker said in an official statement, “On screen, stage, and television, Annette Bening is one of America’s finest living actresses. From her Broadway debut in Tina Howe’s ‘Coastal Disturbances’ to her emotionally complex performance last year in ’20th Century Women’ and now as movie star Gloria Grahame in the upcoming ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,’ her stunning range as an actress has always been staggering and uncompromising.
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda, ‘Daughter of the Nile,’ Mexican Horror & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda worked with the best directors of all-time, and now you can see those collaborations in two-for-one double features.

Quad Cinema

Hou Hsiao-hsien’s masterful Daughter of the Nile has been restored, while the restoration of Tarkovsky’s The Sacrifice is playing.

Metrograph

Philippe Garrel and Stephen King have their final weekends,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Helen Mirren Set for Chaplin Award, European Film Academy Honors Newcomers, and More — Awards Roundup

Helen Mirren Set for Chaplin Award, European Film Academy Honors Newcomers, and More — Awards Roundup
Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our bi-weekly Awards Roundup column.

– The Film Society of Lincoln Center has announced that Academy Award–winning actor Helen Mirren will be honored at the 45th Chaplin Award Gala on Monday, April 30, 2018. A beloved figure of stage, screen, and television, Mirren has bestowed upon the world a series of iconic performances in a career spanning more than fifty years. The annual event will be attended by a host of notable guests and presenters and will include movie and interview clips, culminating in the presentation of the Chaplin Award.

“It is an honor and a pleasure for us to present Helen Mirren with our 45th Chaplin Award,” said Ann Tenenbaum, the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Board Chairman. “From housemaid to Queen and everything in between, Ms. Mirren has delivered masterful performances of complex characters, upending stereotype after stereotype along the way.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Shop Around the Corner

Two bickering shop attendants each find solace in the romantic letters they receive from secret admirers. Of course those unknown admirers are themselves and thereby hangs the plot of Ernst Lubitsch’s gently comic masterpiece starring Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart and Frank Morgan. Movies don’t get more transparently soulful, touching or funny as this 1940 film. It’s practically perfect.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Flight of the Phoenix (Region B)

Forgotten amid Robert Aldrich’s more critic-friendly movies is this superb suspense picture, an against-all-odds thriller that pits an old-school pilot against a push-button young engineer with his own kind of male arrogance. Can a dozen oil workers and random passengers ‘invent’ their way out of an almost certain death trap? It’s a late-career triumph for James Stewart, at the head of a sterling ensemble cast. I review a UK disc in the hope of encouraging a new restoration.

The Flight of the Phoenix

Region B Blu-ray

(will not play in domestic U.S. players)

Masters of Cinema / Eureka Entertainment

1965 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 142 min. / Street Date September 12, 2016 / £12.95

Starring: James Stewart, Richard Attenborough, Peter Finch, Hardy Krüger, Ernest Borgnine, Ian Bannen, Ronald Fraser, Christian Marquand, Dan Duryea, George Kennedy, Gabriele Tinti, Alex Montoya, Peter Bravos, William Aldrich, Barrie Chase.

Cinematography: Joseph Biroc

Stunt Pilot: Paul Mantz

Art Direction: William Glasgow
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jimmy Kimmel Turns Trumpian Weapons on Health Care Bill

Jimmy Kimmel Turns Trumpian Weapons on Health Care Bill
It sure can be uncomfortable when the shoe is on the other foot.

Jimmy Kimmel has gotten a lot of attention for his on-air commentaries on health care this week, and deservedly so. In laying out the stakes very plainly but cogently, and with a dash of folksy humor, his health care segments have actually recalled the work of an American icon, Jimmy Stewart.

In many of his movies, Stewart would go up against powerful forces who were pushing around the little guy — regular citizens just trying to get by. With heartfelt sincerity and plain speech, Stewart’s characters would point out how unfair and ultimately un-American his foes were.

Of course, Stewart was not the only actor to play this kind of character over the years. The “how dare these big shots hurt my fellow Americans” speech is staple of law dramas on TV and many mainstream movies over the years. The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Catalog From The Beyond: Psycho II (1983) and Psycho III (1986)

  • DailyDead
This month marks the one-year anniversary of Catalog from the Beyond! I thank those of you who have followed along with my inane babbling for the last twelve months, and to celebrate, I’ve decided to do an extra large edition featuring not one, but two movies that I’ve been circling since I started this column. I’ve said before that I was a latecomer to the Psycho franchise, with my rationale being that the movie was so ingrained in pop culture that I assumed I knew what it had to offer without needing to actually watch it. Now, of course, I know that I was very wrong. But after finally coming to my senses, I subsequently noticed a sizable portion of the horror community that also sings the praises of the two sequels that it spawned in 1983 and 1986.

What intrigued me about these two movies is that although
See full article at DailyDead »

Film Class: Using Colour

In this instalment of Flickering Myth’s Film Class, Tom Jolliffe looks at intentional use of colours in film…

When it was discovered that film stock could have colour painted onto it, though painstaking and meticulous, it opened up a new dimension in cinema, previously locked into black, white and grey. It allowed a film-maker to create a world that wasn’t so much a clearer representation of our own, but something, at times that relayed certain emotions. It may have been in the case of something like The Wizard Of Oz for example, that those very strong primary and secondary colour palettes, bright and vibrant which were a complete antithesis to the “reality” of the black and white depiction of Kansas, were deliberately heavy in contrast and saturation. Deep colours that were more fantasy than reality. More metaphorical than literal. They had a certain reality for Oz, but furthermore,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Hollywood Flashback: In 1951, a Shocking Sex Scandal Undid Gloria Grahame

Hollywood Flashback: In 1951, a Shocking Sex Scandal Undid Gloria Grahame
Gloria Grahame, who’s portrayed by Annette Bening in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, which premieres at Tiff on Sept. 12, had an exceptional career in the late 1940s and 1950s.

She won a supporting actress Oscar (for 1952’s The Bad and the Beautiful) and worked with legendary actors (Humphrey Bogart, Jimmy Stewart, Dorothy Lamour and Robert Mitchum) and directors (Fritz Lang, Elia Kazan, Vincent Minnelli and Nicholas Ray, whom she married). Grahame’s specialty was the film noir femme fatale. Unfortunately, she also made some fatal career moves.

In June 1951, Ray caught her in bed at their Malibu home...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Law and Jake Wade

Many of MGM’s productions were scraping bottom in 1958, yet the studio found one more acceptable western vehicle for their last big star still on contract. Only-slightly corrupt marshal Robert Taylor edges toward a showdown with the thoroughly corrupt Richard Widmark in an economy item given impressive locations and the sound direction of John Sturges.

The Law and Jake Wade

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 86 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Robert Taylor, Richard Widmark, Patricia Owens, Robert Middleton, Henry Silva, DeForest Kelley, Henry Silva, Burt Douglas, Eddie Firestone.

Cinematography: Robert Surtees

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Written by William Bowers from a novel by Marvin H. Albert

Produced by William B. Hawks

Directed by John Sturges

As the 1950s wore down, MGM was finding it more difficult to properly use its last remaining big-ticket stars on the steady payroll, Cyd Charisse and Robert Taylor. Cyd
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Making the Simple Great: The Power of a Top Director

Tom Jolliffe on the power of a top director…

We’ve all seen great directors deliver complex films, perhaps sprawling with ideas and scope. Perhaps an engrossing retelling of an event in history. A director like Christopher Nolan has spent almost his entire career on weaving complex and intricately stranded high concept films. It takes a good director to do the films he does. No question.

By the same token, there’s a big difference between a great director and a functional director. I think that can often be best illustrated in a film with a simple concept. Take a film for example, which in the context of a directors CV is fairly lithe. A lot of great directors have at least one in their filmography. In the case of Steven Spielberg’s Duel, it was the film that first brought him to attention. The film runs on the ruthlessly
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

A recent article (based on a very unscientific poll) argued that millennials don’t really care about old movies. Maybe that’s true, and maybe it isn’t, but the fact remains that many people disregard classic cinema on principle. These people are missing out, but it only takes one film — the right film — to change their minds and forever alter their viewing habits.

This week’s question: What is one classic film you would recommend to someone who doesn’t watch them?

Candice Frederick (@ReelTalker), Hello Beautiful, /Film, Thrillist, etc

Rebel Without a Cause.” I’ll out myself by saying that I’ve only recently seen this film
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Now – Episode 30 – November 2017 Releases, Observations on Film Art

Aaron is joined by Jeff Smith, Film Professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Lady P, host of Flixwise. Dr. Smith has a focus on music within film, and co-hosts FilmStruck’s Observations on Film Art with David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson. As fate has it, Lady P is in the process of beginning a graduate film studies program at University of Wisconsin-Madison. We had an enjoyable discussion about academic living, from both the faculty and student perspective. We also discuss Criterion’s November 2017 announcements, debate Jimmy Stewart versus Cary Grant, and we talk about FilmStruck’s offerings for the week.

Episode Links FilmStruck – Observations on Film Art Film Art – 11th Edition Flixwise 63 – Sunset Blvd Upcoming Arrow Academy Blu-Ray Releases Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Pauline Lampert: Twitter | Facebook | Website Jeff Smith: Bio Criterion Now: Facebook Group Criterion Cast: Facebook | Twitter

Music for the show is from Fatboy Roberts’ Geek Remixed project.
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘The Philadelphia Story,’ Terry Gilliam’s ‘Jabberwocky’ & More Coming To Criterion

November is still a ways away — who knows what the hell will have happened in our collective Twitter feed by the time good ol’ Nov. comes around? In the event that we’re all still here in three month’s time, here’s what to expect from Criterion in the penultimate month of 2017.

For starters, Criterion is releasing a 4K restoration of “The Philadelphia Story,” the 1940 screwball comedy starring Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, and James Stewart (Stewart ended up winning an Oscar for his performance — the first and last Academy Award of his career).

Continue reading ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ Terry Gilliam’s ‘Jabberwocky’ & More Coming To Criterion at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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