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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 42 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Hillary Clinton’s DNC Finale: What Worked About Her Plain-Spoken Approach

28 July 2016 11:18 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There was nothing subtle about the pop songs that surrounded Hillary Clinton’s acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention. Those kind of songs are the bright, energetic extroverts of the music world, full of you-go-girl empowerment lyrics and as colorful and bouncy as the red, white and blue balloons that fell from the ceiling at the end of the evening.

The balloons fell on time, by the way. The audience more or less followed instructions and deployed giant cards they were given, cards that made the outlines of an American flag appear across the arena in Philadelphia after her speech ended. All week long, there were almost no glitches in the audio or video equipment; in contrast, last week at the Rnc, it almost seemed, at times, as though the electronic gear was possessed by some kind of demon.

It’s the little things that mean a lot, and for sheer presentation, the »

- Maureen Ryan

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Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window – Midnights This Weekend at The Tivoli

10 July 2016 5:49 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“A murderer would never parade his crime in front of an open window”.

Rear Window plays this weekend (July 15th and 16th) at The Tivoli at midnight as part of their Reel Late at the Tivoli midnight series.

As with so many of Alfred’s Hitchcock’s films, Rear Window (1954) is a wonderful example of how to take an almost absurdly simple idea and spin out the maximum tension, character, humor and drama from it. It should be boring (a movie set in one room with a guy who can’t move) and ludicrous (a killer who murders his wife and chops her up in front of his neighbors) but it’s quite the opposite – riveting and eerily plausible. If ever there was a film about voyeurism and its relationship to cinema, this is it; Hitchcock tells engrossing little silent movies of the tenants (the newlyweds, the sculptress, Miss Torso, »

- Tom Stockman

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Watch Dana Carvey's Rapid Fire Impressions of Trump, Charlie Sheen

7 July 2016 10:35 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Comedian Dana Carvey does a string of spot-on impressions of Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Charlie Sheen, Sean Connery and more in a new video for Vanity Fair.

The conceit of the clip finds Carvey playing a celebrity caught in a generic, split-second scenario. For example, "Bernie Sanders helps kids cross the road," "Charlie Sheen tries to hail a cab with someone in it" or "Bill Clinton retrieves his wedding ring from the garbage disposal."

Even though the bits are brief, Carvey's ability to capture a person's essence in the moment is remarkable. »

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Olivia de Havilland Opens Up About Her Love for Married Errol Flynn - and Romance with Jimmy Stewart

7 July 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Accomplished and alluring, Olivia de Havilland dated her share of Hollywood's most dashing power players at the height of her career. Now, the Gone with the Wind actress, who turned 100 last Friday, reflects on the high-profile romances that intrigued a nation, speaking to People about her deep feelings for Errol Flynn, dalliances with John Huston and Howard Hughes - and passing on the role of George Bailey's wife in It's a Wonderful Life because she felt uncomfortable working alongside former love Jimmy Stewart. "It would have meant playing opposite Jimmy Stewart, home from the wars. I knew it would be »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Olivia de Havilland Opens Up About Her Love for Married Errol Flynn - and Romance with Jimmy Stewart

7 July 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Accomplished and alluring, Olivia de Havilland dated her share of Hollywood's most dashing power players at the height of her career. Now, the Gone with the Wind actress, who turned 100 last Friday, reflects on the high-profile romances that intrigued a nation, speaking to People about her deep feelings for Errol Flynn, dalliances with John Huston and Howard Hughes - and passing on the role of George Bailey's wife in It's a Wonderful Life because she felt uncomfortable working alongside former love Jimmy Stewart. "It would have meant playing opposite Jimmy Stewart, home from the wars. I knew it would be »

- Peter Mikelbank

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John Ostrander: American Pop Idol

3 July 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

It’s getting to be the Fourth of July and so it’s apropos to think about this country, what it is, what defines it, what makes it America. Those are somewhat large topics for an essay of 500-700 words (which is where I usually clock in) so we’ll just confine ourselves to one small area.

We deal with pop culture here at ComicMix so let’s think of pop culture icons, those things that we use as symbols of this country. We’re going to focus on one – American movie star/icon John Wayne. Marion Robert Morrison (Wayne’s borth name) made gobs of movies, usually westerns, war movies and detective films. He was a star in the old fashioned Golden Age of Hollywood sense of the word. No one was bigger.

Everybody and his/her brother does an impression of Wayne. My brother does one and I have different versions. »

- John Ostrander

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Why I Can’t Love Brian De Palma (Though I’ve Always Wished I Could)

26 June 2016 4:50 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Back when I was a kid, and a lot more naïve about how the motion picture industry works, I had expectations of filmmakers that were completely unreasonable in their very reverence. If I saw a masterpiece, and then placed the person who directed it high atop my superstar pedestal of art heroes, I longed for him or her to go forward and make 10 or 20 more masterpieces (hey, why not!), and I always felt keenly disappointed if it didn’t work out that way. It was hard for me to wrap my head around the idea that even a movie as enthralling and visionary and apparently brilliantly orchestrated as “The Godfather” or “Nashville” was, among other things, a kind of fantastic accident: a coming together of elements that even the director isn’t always (or ever) in full control of.

But when it came to the art heroes who let me down, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Drive-In Dust Offs: The Vampire (1957)

25 June 2016 10:38 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Horror in the ‘50s tended to lean towards the sci-fi end of the spectrum. And why wouldn’t it? This was the atomic age, and hiding under your school desk during a bomb drill (the safest place to be!) was scarier than any monster Hollywood could muster. So as a form of social moralizing (or an excuse to display giant, mutated lizards on screen), filmmakers merged the fear of nuclear annihilation with the need for entertainment. Most filmmakers, that is. Paul LandresThe Vampire (1957) is a deliberate ride through the (mostly) human condition, small in scope but surprisingly big on emotion. Just don’t expect any vampires, radioactive, sparkly, or otherwise.

What you do get is a story much closer to Stevenson than Stoker, a simple riff on Jekyll and Hyde shot through a cautionary tale about America’s then growing concern with pill poppin’. The Vampire is more concerned »

- Scott Drebit

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25 years ago today: ‘Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves’ opened in theaters

14 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

25 years ago today, audiences first saw Kevin Costner’s turn as Robin Hood on the big screen. It was on June 14, 1991 that Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves opened in theaters. Facing off against Costner’s heroic outlaw was Alan Rickman's Sheriff of Nottingham, just three years after he made his first movie appearance in a role that would become a new classic villain, Hans Gruber in Die Hard. Rickman and Morgan Freeman got critical approval for their performances. Costner and Christian Slater, not so much. Both were nominated for Golden Raspberry Awards for Robin Hood, for Worst Actor and Worst Supporting Actor, respectively. Costner “won” his award, while Slater “lost” to Dan Ackroyd in Nothing but Trouble. Also part of Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves’ legacy: “(Everything I Do) I Do It For You.” Believe it or not, the theme ballad that Bryan Adams bleated out for this movie earned him an Oscar nomination. But Raspberries or no Raspberries, Oscars or no Oscars, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves found its audience. It was the second-highest grossing movie of 1991, beaten only by Terminator 2: Judgement Day. And it was viewed countless times on VHS for years after that. Other notable June 14 happenings in pop culture history: • 1940: Jimmy Stewart film The Mortal Storm opened in theaters. • 1958: The indoor Alice in Wonderland ride opened next to the Mad Tea Party teacups ride in Disneyland. It was also the day the Columbia Sailing Ship first took passengers around Tom Sawyer Island. • 1959: The Matterhorn Bobsleds, Submarine Voyage, and the Monorail opened at Disneyland. Over 2,000 celebrities, members of the press, and dignitaries attended, including Vice President Richard Nixon. • 1965: Paul McCartney recorded the song “Yesterday” at what is now known as Abbey Road Studios in London. McCartney recorded it without the rest of the group, just with a string quartet, his vocals, and an acoustic guitar, making it essentially the first solo performance by the band. He recorded the song in two takes. • 1969: John Lennon and Yoko Ono pre-recorded an interview with David Frost that would air on July 10 that year. Lennon said in the interview, “We're trying to sell peace, like a product, you know, and sell it like people sell soap or soft drinks.” • 1970: Eric Clapton’s new band, Derek and the Dominos, gave their first live performance, at London’s Lyceum Theatre. • 1972: Simon & Garfunkel reunited to perform “Bridge Over Troubled Water” at a fundraising concert for presidential candidate George McGovern at New York’s Madison Square Garden. • 1980: The Pretenders fired bassist Pete Farndon, whose drug use had led to an increasingly strained relationship with his bandmates.  • 1980: Billy Joel began six weeks atop the Billboard album chart with Glass Houses. • 1985: Family Feud, which had debuted in 1976, aired its final episode on ABC until CBS re-launched the game show in 1988. • 1989: The game Tetris was released for Game Boy in Japan. A North American release followed in July. • 1990: CBS, which had been the national broadcaster for the NBA since 1973, televised an NBA game for the final time. It was Game 5 of the NBA Finals between the Detroit Pistons and Portland Trail Blazers. • 1996: Jim Carrey movie The Cable Guy opened in U.S. and Canadian theaters. • 2002: The Bourne Identity and the Sarah Michelle Gellar Scooby-Doo movie opened in theaters. • 2003: Helen Mirren had the order of Dame bestowed upon her when Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II published the list of those she’d chosen to promote to the Order of the British Empire. Three years later, Mirren portrayed Elizabeth II on film in The Queen. Sting and 007 actor Roger Moore were also conferred with the title of “Sir” on this day. • 2011: Andy Grammer released his self-titled debut studio album. Birthdays: Juno writer Diablo Cody (turns 38 today), singer Boy George (55), Reign actor Torrance Coombs (33), Pretty Little Liars actress Lucy Hale (27), actor-motivational speaker J.R. Martinez (33), Glee actor Kevin McHale (28), Falling Skies actor Will Patton (62), Austin Powers director Jay Roach (59), Spy Kids actor Daryl Sabara (24), Blindspot actor Sullivan Stapleton (39) »

- Emily Rome

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Top Movies That Totally Flopped at the Box Office

6 June 2016 3:00 PM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Ah, youth. The days when you reveled in your dorm room and feasted on delicacies like hair dryer-warmed pizza or ramen gently braised over a light bulb. Your bank account might've been empty, but you still managed to feed your soul with the deepest of lessons: Money isn't everything.

And you weren't alone when enlightenment struck. Since Hollywood's golden age, plenty of movies that had hard-knock openings later blossomed into beloved cinematic staples or legit cult classics. Here are just a few, in all their flop-to-favorite glory.

'It's a Wonderful Life' (1946)

Unthinkable as it seems, "It's a Wonderful Life" was not having a very wonderful life at all in 1946. Though award season was kind to the movie, audiences just weren't feeling its darker themes, and Rko Pictures wasn't feeling the money -- "Life" lost about $525,000 at the box office.

Ultimately, this James Stewart-flavored slice of Americana owes »

- Dan Ketchum

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Sergio Leone’s Heirs to Produce Spaghetti Western TV Series Titled ‘Colt’ (Exclusive)

25 May 2016 6:50 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rome — Italy’s expanding Leone Film Group is venturing into the Spaghetti Western territory so dear to its late great founder with an English-language TV series titled “Colt,” based on an idea developed by Sergio Leone, master of the genre.

The concept is centered around the six-shooter packed by Clint Eastwood in “For a Fistful of Dollars.”

“It’s from my father’s idea in which the gun was the main character and the device through which the tale is told,” said Raffaella Leone, who now runs Leone Film Group with her brother Andrea.

“We are thinking of six episodes, each one connected to a single gun shot. But we could do more,” she added.

Italian director Stefano Sollima, who has made a name for himself helming Sky’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob drama “Gomorra,” which is Italy’s all time top TV export, will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner. »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Sergio Leone’s Heirs to Produce Spaghetti Western TV Series Titled ‘Colt’ (Exclusive)

25 May 2016 6:50 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rome — Italy’s expanding Leone Film Group is venturing into the Spaghetti Western territory so dear to its late great founder with an English-language TV series titled “Colt,” based on an idea developed by Sergio Leone, master of the genre.

The concept is centered around the six-shooter packed by Clint Eastwood in “For a Fistful of Dollars.”

“It’s from my father’s idea in which the gun was the main character and the device through which the tale is told,” said Raffaella Leone, who now runs Leone Film Group with her brother Andrea.

“We are thinking of six episodes, each one connected to a single gun shot. But we could do more,” she added.

Italian director Stefano Sollima, who has made a name for himself helming Sky’s naturalistic Neapolitan mob drama “Gomorra,” which is Italy’s all time top TV export, will direct the first two episodes and act as showrunner. »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Stage Door: She Loves Me (and Tony Preview)

2 May 2016 5:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Overheard whilst exiting Broadway's She Loves Me this weekend:

[surprised] That was just like 'You've Got Mail'!

Bingo, tourist ladies, bingo. She Loves Me, the 1963 musical, currently in the middle of its second Broadway revival, is adapted from the 1937 Hungarian play Parfumerie by Miklós László. It's inspired so many riffs so often you'd think it was a Shakespeare comedy. The play has already resulted in three well-known movies in the form of the touching Jimmy Stewart clasic (The Shop Around the Corner, 1940), an undervalued Judy Garland romance (In the Good Old Summertime, 1949), and the Meg Ryan/Tom Hanks rom-com You've Got Mail (1998). The shop changes as does the mode by which the anonymous lovers correspond without realizing they know and hate each other in real life. Expect an internet catfishing riff on the story in 3...2...1... Anyway, in 1963 the play was adapted into She Loves Me for the musical stage. »

- NATHANIEL R

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How superhero movies embraced wild west frontier libertarianism

28 April 2016 9:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Captain America: Civil War isn’t the only comic-book movie to champion the strong individual over unreliable authority figures when it comes to sorting good from bad. The tactic worked well before – in westerns

Link Appleyard might be the archetypal cowardly wild west lawman. John Ford’s classic 1962 western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance presents the gutless town marshal, played by Andy Devine, as a legacy of the cracks in the system that require strong men like John Wayne’s steely Tom Doniphon to deliver true justice in a time of chaos. When Lee Marvin’s bestial Valance rolls into town to bully greenhorn lawyer James Stewart, it is not the bumbling Appleyard who steps up to help him. Instead, it is the indestructible Wayne, a superhero in everything but name and outfit, who delivers the bullet that saves Stewart’s bacon.

Related: Captain America: Civil War – conflicted heroes »

- Ben Child

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How superhero movies embraced wild west frontier libertarianism

28 April 2016 9:39 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Captain America: Civil War isn’t the only comic-book movie to champion the strong individual over unreliable authority figures when it comes to sorting good from bad. The tactic worked well before – in westerns

Link Appleyard might be the archetypal cowardly wild west lawman. John Ford’s classic 1962 western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance presents the gutless town marshal, played by Andy Devine, as a legacy of the cracks in the system that require strong men like John Wayne’s steely Tom Doniphon to deliver true justice in a time of chaos. When Lee Marvin’s bestial Valance rolls into town to bully greenhorn lawyer James Stewart, it is not the bumbling Appleyard who steps up to help him. Instead, it is the indestructible Wayne, a superhero in everything but name and outfit, who delivers the bullet that saves Stewart’s bacon.

Related: Captain America: Civil War – conflicted heroes »

- Ben Child

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Top Ten Tuesday – The Top Ten Black Dresses In The Movies

26 April 2016 6:18 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The Little Black Dress—From Mourning to Night is a free exhibit currently at The Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The exhibit runs through September 5th.

The Little Black Dress – a simple, short cocktail dress—is a sartorial staple for most contemporary women. Prior to the early 20th century, simple, unadorned black garments were limited to mourning, and strict social rules regarding mourning dress were rigidly observed.Featuring over 60 dresses from the Missouri History Museum’s world-renowned textile collection, this fun yet thought-provoking exhibit explores the subject of mourning, as well as the transition of black from a symbol of grief to a symbol of high fashion. You’ll also see fascinating artifacts—from hair jewelry to tear catchers—that were once a regular part of the mourning process. Plus, you’ll have the chance to share your own memories of your favorite »

- Tom Stockman

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Vincent Lindon on Career Goals, the Intimacy of Filmmaking, and ‘The Measure of a Man’

19 April 2016 10:19 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The Best Actor winner at this year’s Cannes Film Festival wasn’t a boisterous, awards-reel-ready turn from an international superstar, but a performance as modest and determined in emotional directness as the film it’s so amply supporting. It’s only fitting, then, that most talk about The Measure of a Man will center on Vincent Lindon, whose work makes for a perfect compliment to the Dardenne-esque drama crafted by writer-director (and frequent collaborator) Stéphane Brizé.

To mark the film’s U.S. release and celebrate Lindon’s other accomplishments, New York City’s Metrograph hosted a four-film retrospective — but, aside from introductions and Q & As, he wouldn’t have been seen too often. When speaking to the actor, he exhibited no ego when sharing a few blunt thoughts about viewing his own work while, in turn, complimenting the many people who help the films get onscreen. For more on that, »

- Nick Newman

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Judy by the Numbers: "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows"

13 April 2016 5:37 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. revolutionized entertainment. Though he was best known for the Vaudeville showgirls in the musical review that bore his name, but his reach extended beyond the Follies. He legitimized Vaudeville and funded the show that would spawn the modern American musical. Though Ziegfeld died in 1932, MGM continued glorifying - and profiting from - Ziegfeld's legacy.  In 1936, MGM released a biopic, The Great Ziegfeld based on the life of Ziegfeld and his wife, Billy Burke. The success of that film led the studio to announce a spiritual successor in 1938: Ziegfeld Girl, set to star Joan Crawford, Eleanor Powell, and Virginia Bruce. But when the movie was finally made 3 years later, the cast had changed a bit. 

The Movie: Ziegfeld Girl (1941)

The Songwriters: Joseph McCarthy & Harry Carroll, from a tune by Chopin

The Players: Judy Garland, Lana Turner, »

- Anne Marie

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Barbershop: The Next Cut review – return of Ice Cube, hair-styling hero

12 April 2016 5:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In the third part of this engaging trilogy, Ice Cube dispenses paternal wisdom while uniting a tough Chicago neighbourhood – helped by sassy Nicki Minaj

When Ice Cube released AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted few would have predicted that, two and a half decades later, he’d be the closest thing to Jimmy Stewart in 21st-century cinema. As Calvin Palmer, co-owner of Chicago’s top-notch locale for stylish ’dos and sagacious bon mots, Ice Cube is a caring father, crafty businessman and, he’ll come to realise, community linchpin. But his neighbourhood is quite different from the Bedford Falls where Stewart’s George Bailey lived in It’s a Wonderful Life. “The south side is no place to flex,” Palmer sighs to his wife Jennifer (Jazsmin Lewis), referring to their 14-year-old son Jalen (Michael Rainey Jr). All parents have their woes when the kids hit puberty. Parents in black America have struggles »

- Jordan Hoffman

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The Science of Failure in the Films of Alexander Payne

12 April 2016 11:33 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Following his small-scale, black-and-white drama NebraskaAlexander Payne has jumped to something with quite a large scope. He’s finally underway on production for what’s his biggest film yet, the Matt Damon-led sci-fi drama Downsizing, which is a social satire depicting a man who believes he’ll have a better life if he shrinks himself. Ahead of the shoot, Payne discussed his choice for a leading man. “Among contemporary leading men he is the closest thing we have to an Every Man. We saw it in The Martian particularly. More and more he is assuming the role that say James Stewart and more recently Tom Hanks used to play. At least you can relate to the guy and you can project some of your own fears, yearnings, aspirations onto his face. You understand him,” the director recently told Leo Adam Biga, author of a book on Payne.

He continues, »

- Leonard Pearce

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

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