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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 44 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

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Richard Corliss, Time magazine film critic, dies at 71

24 April 2015 8:42 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Richard Corliss, the film critic for Time Magazine, passed away at the age of 71 due to complications following a stroke Thursday night. Time editor Nancy Gibbs sent a note to the staff Friday morning about his passing, which you can read here.

Corliss was a film critic with Time for 35 years, sharing bylines alongside fellow critic Richard Schickel. Prior to that he was the editor in chief of Film Comment and had written for National Review among many other magazines.

Corliss challenged Andrew Sarris’s auteur theory, despite being one of Sarris’s students, and he likewise penned a scathing critique of the movie review show Siskel & Ebert, “All Thumbs“. Ebert would later include that article in one of his own books, and Corliss spoke highly of Ebert in the tribute documentary Life Itself.

Time compiled a list of 25 of his greatest movie reviews, all of them classics, but not »

- Brian Welk

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Richard Corliss, Venerable Time Film Critic, Dies at 71

24 April 2015 8:34 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Corliss, for 35 years the witty, incisive and compassionate voice on film and culture at Time magazine, died Thursday after a stroke, the magazine announced Friday.

Time editor Nancy Gibbs messaged her staff with the news, expressing her “great sorrow” at the death of a man who she said “had to write, like the rest of us breathe and eat and sleep.”

“It’s not clear that Richard ever slept, for the sheer expanse of his knowledge and writing defies the normal contours of professional life,” Gibbs added.

Corliss, 71, suffered the stroke a week earlier, according to an obituary on Time’s website. He died in New York City and his magazine declared that it, “along with all lovers of film and great critical writing, will have a hard time recovering.”

The critic reviewed films tirelessly—more than 1,000 of them, while also authoring four books and writing sweeping narratives on »

- James Rainey

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The Simpsons' top 30 movie references

23 April 2015 6:10 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The Simpsons has pastiched hundreds of movies in its time. From Hitchcock to Kubrick to Disney, we select our top 30 favourites...

The Simpsons has a long history of peppering its stories with pop culture references, and some of the show’s finest gags stem from the world of cinema. These have ranged from the briefest of quotes, to full on shot-for-shot parodies and extended episode-long homages.

Most striking in trying to put this list together was the sheer volume of movie references there are to choose from. In pretty much any given episode of The Simpsons, there are at least a couple, with nods to James Bond, 2001: A Space Odyssey and the work of Alfred Hitchcock proving three of the most regular candidates. The tributes to numerous great horror movies in the show’s Treehouse Of Horror episodes could have been used to fill this list all on their own. »

- louisamellor

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9 Great Films Influenced By Alfred Hitchcock's 'Vertigo'

16 April 2015 2:15 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Brooklyn Academy of Music has collated an impressive, erudite collection of films of varying brow heights that, in some way, draw inspiration from "Vertigo." Put together by C. Mason Wells in collaboration with BAMcinematek's Nellie Killian and David Reilly, the series refracts Alfred Hitchcock's kaleidoscopic masterpiece through seven decades of world cinema, examining its vast influence. Since its lukewarm premiere in 1958, "Vertigo" has slowly and steadily climbed the pantheon of American cinema, finally usurping Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" and ascending to the top of Sight & Sound's list of the best movies of all time. Lists and rankings aside, few would argue that "Vertigo" is anything less than a feverish masterwork, the epitome of Hitchcock's formal prowess and his most emotionally fragile work. Pervaded by love and lust, betrayal and loss, the dark tale of an emasculated man (Jimmy Stewart) driven to chasing obsession on a »

- Greg Cwik

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A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in the Movies

13 April 2015 2:25 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

7 April 2015 2:54 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon »

- Carmel Dagan

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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

7 April 2015 2:54 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon »

- Carmel Dagan

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'Dukes of Hazzard' Star James Best Passes Away at 88

7 April 2015 12:18 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

James Best, who played the memorable Sherrif Roscoe P. Coltrane on the hit TV series The Dukes of Hazzard, passed away yesterday at the age of 88 from complications of pneumonia. The actor played Roscoe P. Coltrane, the longtime rival to the Duke brothers, on all seven seasons of The Dukes of Hazzard, which ran from 1979 to 1985.

The actor was raised in Indiana and ended up moving to New York after serving in World War II. He found work as a fashion model which lead to him being discoverd by a casting agent. He became a contract player for Universal Pictures. He appeared in a number of films throughout the 1950s such as Winchester '73 alongside James Stewart and The Cimarron Kid with Audie Murphy. He ended up working in both TV and film throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, appearing in notable episodes of The Twilight Zone, Wagon Train and Have Gun - Will Travel, »

- MovieWeb

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Spend An Evening With TCM “In The Company of Legends”

6 April 2015 10:46 AM, PDT | ChannelGuideMag | See recent ChannelGuideMag news »

On Tuesday, April 7, TCM is taking a night to recognize two of entertainment’s greatest celebrity documentarians. Between 1980 and 2005, Joan Kramer and David Heeley produced groundbreaking celebrity profiles ranging from Hepburn to Garland to Fonda to Flynn. The TCM special features five of the duo’s profiles (James Stewart: A Wonderful Life, The Spencer Tracy Legacy: A Tribute by Katharine Hepburn, Fonda on Fonda, Katharine Hepburn: All About Me and Bacall on Bogart), with Kramer and Heeley introducing each film in a joint interview conducted by TCM’s Robert Osborne. When asked the main difference between the stars of the … Continue reading →

The post Spend An Evening With TCM “In The Company of Legends” appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine. »

- Kellie Freeze

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8 Unmade Steven Spielberg Films

31 March 2015 10:47 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Last week we reported on Steven Spielberg’s plans to direct an adaptation of the cult sci-fi novel by Ernest Cline, Ready Player One. Color us excited. The novel involves players of a video game journeying into a virtual reality world rife with pop culture references and Easter eggs to the real world. The player who can decipher all the mysteries and references in the world wins the opportunity to control it. In Spielberg’s capable hands, it has the potential to be a technical marvel and a modern classic.

That is, if he actually makes it. Ready Player One poses some unusually problematic challenges on just a practical standpoint. Cline’s story falls into the “unfilmable novel” territory, not just for the digital world necessary for a filmmaker to recreate, but also in terms of licensing. To get the rights to depict the many iconic film and TV characters »

- Brian Welk

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The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

30 March 2015 7:48 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143)  Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming »

- Movie Geeks

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Fighting talk by Anne-Katrin Titze

20 March 2015 12:51 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Kévin Azaïs and Adèle Haenel in Thomas Cailley's Love At First Fight (Les Combattants)

Love At First Fight (Les Combattants) stars César Best Actress winner Adèle Haenel and Kévin Azaïs with Antoine Laurent, Brigitte Roüan, Léa Pelletant and Pascal Bernagaud, directed by Best First Film César honoree Thomas Cailley. Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom. James Stewart's obsession with Madeleine in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, structuring a film in three parts, internal restrictions and an unhealthy diet enter into our 20th Anniversary Rendez-Vous with French Cinema in New York conversation.

Love at First Fight (Les Combattants) director Thomas Cailley on Arnaud and Madeleine: "During the course of the film, they start out as prisoners of their situation." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

For a film that feels achingly of the now, technology is kept out of the picture for the most part. Cailley shows the toll it has taken on the way »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Hitchcock's 'Rear Window' Returns to Theaters

20 March 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Thelma Ritter and the gang will live on the big screen once again in Alfred Hitchcock's 1954 "Rear Window." Presented by Fathom Events, Turner Classic Movies (TCM) and Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, this classic 1954 Alfred Hitchcock film is digitally remastered with a specially produced introduction by TCM host Ben Mankiewicz. The inimitable thriller that follows Jefferies (Stewart) from his wheelchair down a rabbit hole of creeping obsession screens March 22 and March 25 in theaters nationwide — just ahead of the TCM Film Festival, kicking off March 26. (In the La area alone, there are a lot of screens showing "Rear Window.") More info here. Read More: 'Vertigo' Hits Film Forum: Why It's Still One of the All-Time Greats »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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How Cell Phones Would Have Ruined Most of Our Favorite Movies

18 March 2015 4:46 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

How Cell Phones Would Have Ruined Most Of Our Favorite Movies

By

Alex Simon

If you’re a pop culture maven, most likely it can be agreed that the modern cell phone can be traced back to two classic TV series of the 1960s: Star Trek and Get Smart. Captain James Tiberius Kirk and his USS Enterprise crew were always armed with their “communicators” when traveling abroad on a distant planet. They were palm-sized devices with covers the flipped open, providing instant connection with the orbiting space ship. This design was aped, no doubt, by former Trekkies for the classic “flip phone” design that ruled the high-tech roost in the late 90s and early millennium.

Secret Agent 86 Maxwell Smart had his shoe phone, surely the most creative (and ridiculous) example of technology ever invented by someone who was most likely thought to be a creative and scientific genius. However, it »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Peter Bogdanovich Pushes for Non-‘Titanic’ Tentpoles

15 March 2015 9:14 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Peter Bogdanovich blames James Cameron’s success with 1997’s “Titanic” for studios pulling the plug on smaller movies, such as his 1971 hit “The Last Picture Show.”

“The worst thing was when Cameron made ‘Titanic’ and spent $150 million,” he said Saturday night after receiving the King Vidor Award from the San Luis Obispo International Film Festival.

“So everyone was predicting a disaster and when it wasn’t, then everyone started spending that much,” said Bogdanovich. “We made ‘The Last Picture Show’ for $1.3 million and it made a ton of money.”

The Last Picture Show” made nearly $30 million in worldwide grosses. “Titanic” grossed $1.8 billion.

The Last Picture Show” star Timothy Bottoms held a Q&A with the director at the Fremont Theater prior to a screening of the desolate black-and-white drama, nominated for eight Oscars including best picture and director (Ben Johnson and Cloris Leachman won for their supporting performances).

“I never »

- Dave McNary

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‘Please Murder Me’ sees underrated greats Lansbury and Burr go head-to-head

13 March 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Please Murder Me

Written by Donald Hyde and Al C. Ward

Directed by Peter Godfrey

U.S.A., 1956

*It should be noted that the following review contains spoilers pertaining to the film’s plot, including an important revelation on which most of the drama hinges. Readers have been forewarned.

Defence Attorney Craig Carlson (Raymond Burr) sits alone in his office late one night. Having turned on a recording machine he begins to narrate to a fellow lawyer that he is surely to be killed within the hour. At that moment the film flashbacks to some months ago when Craig approaches a dear old friend, Joe Leeds (Dick Foran) with terrible news: Joe’s wife and him have fallen in deeply in love. Joe appears visibly disappointed, but, curiously, less angry than one might expect. He implores Craig to give him time to mull over the situation. Shortly thereafter Joe returns home to see his wife, »

- Edgar Chaput

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‘Big Bang Theory’ Star Jim Parsons on His Road to the Hollywood Walk of Fame

11 March 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

When Jim Parsons first strolled the Hollywood Walk of Fame as a teenage tourist from Houston, he didn’t have the sort of epiphany Sheldon Cooper lives for.

“I already enjoyed acting,” Parsons says on a break from shooting “The Big Bang Theory.” But “there was not some sort of sense of ‘maybe one day.’ It did not even enter my mind.”

Parsons is delighted, in his own quiet way, to become a name on Hollywood Boulevard. “I like how all-encompassing it is,” Parsons says. “It could be radio announcers you have never seen before or very, very visible and famous actors.”

The busy thesp is preparing for his third run on Broadway in the spring, but his star is in the TV category for playing the socially maladroit, brilliant physicist Cooper on the mega-hit CBS comedy. During its eight seasons, Parsons has continued to expand the role, though he »

- Jacqueline Cutler

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Bring a Notebook and Tissues to Romantic Epic The Lovers

10 March 2015 9:00 PM, PDT | Village Voice | See recent Village Voice news »

The movies generally refute the toxic bromide that nice guys finish last, but not The Lovers. A dopey but lavish romantic epic about magical rings that unite soul mates, Roland Joffé's latest proposes that to be a mensch is to be a martyr. Such is the fate that befalls 21st-century marine archaeologist Jay Fennel and 18th-century British colonialist James Stewart, both played with squinty stoicism by Josh Hartnett. Sure, the two men have gorgeous women hankering after them, but bad luck haunts their gentle hearts: Jay is knocked into a coma while rescuing his wife (Tamsin Egerton), while James can't help nobly siding with Britain's conquests (e.g., Scotland, India). The drama mostly follows James along his journey through a partially colonized India, wher »

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The Story Of Film: An Odyssey – The DVD Review

10 March 2015 7:22 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

I love the movies, really, truly I do, I love the movies. Cinema, motion pictures, movies, film, whatever you want to label this peculiar art form that we all cherish here at We Are Movie Geeks, I have loved it ever since the first time I saw a movie on television, in a theater or at a drive-in. I wish I could recall the first movie I ever saw and what the medium was in which I saw it.

One of my earliest memories was the yearly showing of Wizard of Oz on television and my delight at seeing Judy Garland in a different movie, Pigskin Parade, and realizing that actors made a living by appearing in more than one movie or television series.

I can recall seeing Battle Beyond the Stars at the Pine Hill Drive-in in Piedmont, Missouri, one of the Russian space movies bought and re-edited by Roger Corman. »

- Sam Moffitt

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 44 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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