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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 51 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The 57 Greatest Westerns Ever, Ranked

26 May 2015 2:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

It's fitting that Clint Eastwood and John Wayne both have the same birthday week. (Wayne, who died in 1979, was born May 26, 1907, while Eastwood turns 85 on May 31). After all, these two all-American actors' careers span the history of that most American of movie genres, the western.

Both iconic actors were top box office draws for decades, both seldom stretched from their familiar personas, and both played macho, conservative cowboy heroes who let their firearms do most of the talking. Each represented one of two very different strains of western, the traditional and the revisionist.

As a birthday present to Hollywood's biggest heroes of the Wild West, here are the top 57 westerns you need to see.

57. 'Meek's Cutoff' (2010)

Indie filmmaker Kelly Reichardt and her frequent leading lady, Michelle Williams, are the talents behind this sparse, docudrama about an 1845 wagon train whose Oregon Trail journey goes horribly awry. It's an intense »

- Gary Susman

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Love’

20 May 2015 11:15 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The cast holds nothing back in Gaspar Noe’s “Love,” but it’s the ever-provocative writer-director who exposes the most in his sexually explicit, semi-autobiographical Cannes scandal-in-the-making, a courageously personal account of an aspiring filmmaker torn between the mother of his child and the one that got away. The helmer of such transgressive pics as “Irreversible” and “Enter the Void,” Noe resolved to make a relationship movie that was honest about human sexuality, and though the stereoscopic 3D result thrusts plenty of the old bump-and-grind in audiences’ faces, it would be disingenuous to pretend that other directors haven’t gotten there first — and to more revealing effect. Still, you’ve gotta hand it to Noe for leaving no taboo unturned, and for putting so much of himself into a film that’s bound to leave titillation seekers resenting its creator during the long stretches of wallowing introspection between climaxes.

Given »

- Peter Debruge

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‘Actors are cattle’: when Hitchcock met Truffaut

11 May 2015 11:01 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hidden necrophilia in Vertigo, glowing milk, an on-set spat with Montgomery Clift … in 1962, Alfred Hitchcock revealed his tricks, and the often shocking meanings behind his films, to fellow director François Truffaut. Now their talks have been turned into the revealing film Hitchcock/Truffaut

There’s a derangingly perverted scene in the 1958 film Vertigo. The femme fatale Judy, played by Kim Novak, appears before Scottie, James Stewart’s retired cop, in a sleazy motel room. She’s dressed as the dead woman with whom he’s obsessed. “I indulged in a form of necrophilia,” the director Alfred Hitchcock told François Truffaut during a week-long series of interviews they did in Hollywood in 1962.

Scottie has insisted that Judy dye her hair blond and wear the outfit he bought. Only then will he be able to have sex with her. But there’s a problem. Scottie can’t consummate his desire because one »

- Stuart Jeffries

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A Brief (Pun Intended) History Of Lawyers In The Movies Part II

6 May 2015 4:06 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. Enjoy, and please refrain from suing us if you feel otherwise...

1. Devil’s Advocate (1997)

Keanu Reeves plays Kevin Lomax, a hot-shot young Florida lawyer who is all about climbing the ladder. When he gets an offer he can’t refuse from a high-powered New York firm, led by the legendary John Milton »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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12 Stories of Sex in Museums

6 May 2015 10:33 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Once upon a time, museums were very erotic spaces, ecstasy machines, places where people picked up or fantasized about people, went into deep out-of-body states of pleasure near one another, catching fleeting glimpses of strangers in reflections looking at one another, seeing and losing one another in galleries, then seeing one another again, always almost alone, always in this excited psychic space of rest, pleasure, and strange alienation.Old film directors knew this. In Vertigo, Hitchcock pictures Jimmy Stewart enraptured by Kim Novak as she looks longingly at a portrait of a woman who looks uncannily like her; Brian De Palma’s Dressed to Kill opens with a five-minute flirtation, pursuit, and meeting in the Met, all while in the presence of paintings of the flesh. Once upon a time in the early 1980s, even I met a girl in the old Musée Picasso ... Alas, and probably for good, museums »

- Jerry Saltz

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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Arrow Films announces August Blu-ray line-up

2 May 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

It’s the start of a new month, and as ever in film and Blu-ray circles, nothing gets the fans salivating more than the upcoming release slate from the awesome folks over at Arrow Films. Its line-up of releases for August has been unveiled (both UK and Us), and you can view all the information below, including the stand-out title, David Cronenberg’s Videodrome, which is getting a very special, limited edition release in a collector’s package.

Videodrome: Limited Edition

Combining the bio-horror elements of his earlier films whilst anticipating the technological themes of his later work, Videodrome exemplifies Cronenberg’s extraordinary talent for making both visceral and cerebral cinema. Max Renn (James Woods) is looking for fresh new content for his TV channel when he happens across some illegal S&M-style broadcasts called ‘Videodrome’. Embroiling his girlfriend Nicki (Debbie Harry) in his search for the source, his »

- Scott J. Davis

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Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

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Richard Corliss, Time magazine film critic, dies at 71

24 April 2015 8:42 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Richard Corliss, the film critic for Time Magazine, passed away at the age of 71 due to complications following a stroke Thursday night. Time editor Nancy Gibbs sent a note to the staff Friday morning about his passing, which you can read here.

Corliss was a film critic with Time for 35 years, sharing bylines alongside fellow critic Richard Schickel. Prior to that he was the editor in chief of Film Comment and had written for National Review among many other magazines.

Corliss challenged Andrew Sarris’s auteur theory, despite being one of Sarris’s students, and he likewise penned a scathing critique of the movie review show Siskel & Ebert, “All Thumbs“. Ebert would later include that article in one of his own books, and Corliss spoke highly of Ebert in the tribute documentary Life Itself.

Time compiled a list of 25 of his greatest movie reviews, all of them classics, but not »

- Brian Welk

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Richard Corliss, Venerable Time Film Critic, Dies at 71

24 April 2015 8:34 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Richard Corliss, for 35 years the witty, incisive and compassionate voice on film and culture at Time magazine, died Thursday after a stroke, the magazine announced Friday.

Time editor Nancy Gibbs messaged her staff with the news, expressing her “great sorrow” at the death of a man who she said “had to write, like the rest of us breathe and eat and sleep.”

“It’s not clear that Richard ever slept, for the sheer expanse of his knowledge and writing defies the normal contours of professional life,” Gibbs added.

Corliss, 71, suffered the stroke a week earlier, according to an obituary on Time’s website. He died in New York City and his magazine declared that it, “along with all lovers of film and great critical writing, will have a hard time recovering.”

The critic reviewed films tirelessly—more than 1,000 of them, while also authoring four books and writing sweeping narratives on »

- James Rainey

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The Simpsons' top 30 movie references

23 April 2015 6:10 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The Simpsons has pastiched hundreds of movies in its time. From Hitchcock to Kubrick to Disney, we select our top 30 favourites...

The Simpsons has a long history of peppering its stories with pop culture references, and some of the show’s finest gags stem from the world of cinema. These have ranged from the briefest of quotes, to full on shot-for-shot parodies and extended episode-long homages.

Most striking in trying to put this list together was the sheer volume of movie references there are to choose from. In pretty much any given episode of The Simpsons, there are at least a couple, with nods to James Bond, 2001: A Space Odyssey and the work of Alfred Hitchcock proving three of the most regular candidates. The tributes to numerous great horror movies in the show’s Treehouse Of Horror episodes could have been used to fill this list all on their own. »

- louisamellor

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9 Great Films Influenced By Alfred Hitchcock's 'Vertigo'

16 April 2015 2:15 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Brooklyn Academy of Music has collated an impressive, erudite collection of films of varying brow heights that, in some way, draw inspiration from "Vertigo." Put together by C. Mason Wells in collaboration with BAMcinematek's Nellie Killian and David Reilly, the series refracts Alfred Hitchcock's kaleidoscopic masterpiece through seven decades of world cinema, examining its vast influence. Since its lukewarm premiere in 1958, "Vertigo" has slowly and steadily climbed the pantheon of American cinema, finally usurping Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" and ascending to the top of Sight & Sound's list of the best movies of all time. Lists and rankings aside, few would argue that "Vertigo" is anything less than a feverish masterwork, the epitome of Hitchcock's formal prowess and his most emotionally fragile work. Pervaded by love and lust, betrayal and loss, the dark tale of an emasculated man (Jimmy Stewart) driven to chasing obsession on a »

- Greg Cwik

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A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in the Movies

13 April 2015 2:25 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

By Alex Simon

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies.

1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee’s award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

7 April 2015 2:54 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon »

- Carmel Dagan

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James Best, Sheriff on ‘Dukes of Hazzard,’ Dies at 88

7 April 2015 2:54 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

James Best, a character actor best known for his role as bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane on CBS comedy “The Dukes of Hazzard,” died in Hickory, N.C., on April 6 from complications of pneumonia. He was 88.

The Dukes of Hazzard” ran from 1979-85. Best also voiced the character of Sheriff Coltrane on the 1983 animated series “The Dukes,” reprised the role for reunion movies in 1997 and 2000 and again voiced the character for videogames in 1999 and 2004.

Best was set to appear in the movie “Old Soldiers,” also starring Jake Busey, Doris Roberts, Rance Howard, Hugh O’Brian and Clifton James, but that movie is reported to be in pre-production. Best’s most recent completed project was the 2013 TV movie “The Sweeter Side of Life.”

The actor played the sheriff in the beloved 1972 Martin Ritt film “Sounder,” appeared in 1976 film “Ode to Billy Joe,” had a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s “Nickelodeon »

- Carmel Dagan

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'Dukes of Hazzard' Star James Best Passes Away at 88

7 April 2015 12:18 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

James Best, who played the memorable Sherrif Roscoe P. Coltrane on the hit TV series The Dukes of Hazzard, passed away yesterday at the age of 88 from complications of pneumonia. The actor played Roscoe P. Coltrane, the longtime rival to the Duke brothers, on all seven seasons of The Dukes of Hazzard, which ran from 1979 to 1985.

The actor was raised in Indiana and ended up moving to New York after serving in World War II. He found work as a fashion model which lead to him being discoverd by a casting agent. He became a contract player for Universal Pictures. He appeared in a number of films throughout the 1950s such as Winchester '73 alongside James Stewart and The Cimarron Kid with Audie Murphy. He ended up working in both TV and film throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, appearing in notable episodes of The Twilight Zone, Wagon Train and Have Gun - Will Travel, »

- MovieWeb

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Spend An Evening With TCM “In The Company of Legends”

6 April 2015 10:46 AM, PDT | ChannelGuideMag | See recent ChannelGuideMag news »

On Tuesday, April 7, TCM is taking a night to recognize two of entertainment’s greatest celebrity documentarians. Between 1980 and 2005, Joan Kramer and David Heeley produced groundbreaking celebrity profiles ranging from Hepburn to Garland to Fonda to Flynn. The TCM special features five of the duo’s profiles (James Stewart: A Wonderful Life, The Spencer Tracy Legacy: A Tribute by Katharine Hepburn, Fonda on Fonda, Katharine Hepburn: All About Me and Bacall on Bogart), with Kramer and Heeley introducing each film in a joint interview conducted by TCM’s Robert Osborne. When asked the main difference between the stars of the … Continue reading →

The post Spend An Evening With TCM “In The Company of Legends” appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine. »

- Kellie Freeze

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8 Unmade Steven Spielberg Films

31 March 2015 10:47 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Last week we reported on Steven Spielberg’s plans to direct an adaptation of the cult sci-fi novel by Ernest Cline, Ready Player One. Color us excited. The novel involves players of a video game journeying into a virtual reality world rife with pop culture references and Easter eggs to the real world. The player who can decipher all the mysteries and references in the world wins the opportunity to control it. In Spielberg’s capable hands, it has the potential to be a technical marvel and a modern classic.

That is, if he actually makes it. Ready Player One poses some unusually problematic challenges on just a practical standpoint. Cline’s story falls into the “unfilmable novel” territory, not just for the digital world necessary for a filmmaker to recreate, but also in terms of licensing. To get the rights to depict the many iconic film and TV characters »

- Brian Welk

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The Birds Screens at Schlafly Thursday – Here are Alfred Hitchcock’s Ten Best Movies

30 March 2015 7:48 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

The Birds screens at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Ave.- at Manchester – Maplewood, Mo 63143)  Thursday, April 2nd at 7pm. It is a benefit for Helping Kids Together (more details about this event can be found Here)

This gives us a perfect excuse to re-run this top ten list from March of 2012. Alfred Hitchcock directed 54 feature films between 1925 and 1976, and here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are his ten best:

Frenzy

Frenzy, Hitchcock’s next to last feature film from 1972, represented a homecoming of sorts since it was the first film completely shot in his native England since his silents and early ” talkies ” in the 1930’s. By dipping into the then somewhat new territory of serial killers, he took full advantage of the new cinema freedoms and truly earned his ‘ R ‘ MPAA rating. Perhaps ole’ ” Hitch ” wanted to give those young up-and-coming »

- Movie Geeks

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Fighting talk by Anne-Katrin Titze

20 March 2015 12:51 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Kévin Azaïs and Adèle Haenel in Thomas Cailley's Love At First Fight (Les Combattants)

Love At First Fight (Les Combattants) stars César Best Actress winner Adèle Haenel and Kévin Azaïs with Antoine Laurent, Brigitte Roüan, Léa Pelletant and Pascal Bernagaud, directed by Best First Film César honoree Thomas Cailley. Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom. James Stewart's obsession with Madeleine in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, structuring a film in three parts, internal restrictions and an unhealthy diet enter into our 20th Anniversary Rendez-Vous with French Cinema in New York conversation.

Love at First Fight (Les Combattants) director Thomas Cailley on Arnaud and Madeleine: "During the course of the film, they start out as prisoners of their situation." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

For a film that feels achingly of the now, technology is kept out of the picture for the most part. Cailley shows the toll it has taken on the way »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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