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Planet Of The Apes 50th Anniversary Blu-ray / DVD Released by Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment

  • DailyDead
With tomorrow marking the 50th anniversary of the original Planet of the Apes premiere screening in New York City, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment is getting the celebration started with a special Blu-ray, DVD, and digital release of the iconic film:

Press Release: Los Angeles, CA (Feb. 7, 2018) – Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment announced the

Planet Of The Apes 1968 50th Anniversary edition today on Digital, Blu-ray and DVD.

Charlton Heston stars in the original cinematic masterpiece that turned the world of science fiction upside down. A bewildered astronaut named Taylor (Heston) crash-lands on a strange planet ruled by talking apes who use a primitive race of humans for experimentation and sport. Soon Taylor's survival depends on the kindness of chimpanzee scientists Cornelius and Zira (Roddy McDowall and Kim Hunter) and his escape to the Forbidden Zone, where he uncovers a devastating secret that may hold the key to his own destiny.
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Kid Galahad

This 1937 boxing melodrama was eclipsed by its own 1962 remake starring Elvis Presley and suffered a humiliating title change (The Battling Bellhop) for TV distribution. Regardless, Michael Curtiz’s film, starring Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart and Bette Davis, is sufficiently sturdy to go 12 rounds with any comer and exhibited enough moxey to earn a rematch in 1941 as The Wagons Roll At Night, again with Bogart. For a thoroughly researched and fascinating look at Curtiz’ prolific career, look at Alan K. Rode’s comprehensive biography Michael Curtiz: A Life in Film, which can be ordered here.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Critic's Picks: A January To-Do List for Film Buffs in L.A.

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Michael Curtiz At The Billy Wilder | 10899 Wilshire Blvd.

Beginning Friday and running through mid-March, the UCLA Film and Television Archive will be surveying the career of Hollywood journeyman Michael Curtiz. Primarily recognized today as the man behind Hollywood’s most beloved espionage romance, Casablanca, Curtiz in fact directed north of 150 films over a half-century in the movie business. Commencing with a star-studded double bill of Casablanca and Kid Galahad, the latter starring Curtiz’s Casablanca lead Humphrey Bogart alongside Bette Davis and Edward G. Robinson, the series zig-zags...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Martin Ransohoff, Filmways Founder and ‘Cincinnati Kid’ Producer, Dies at 90

Martin Ransohoff, Filmways Founder and ‘Cincinnati Kid’ Producer, Dies at 90
Martin Ransohoff, who produced notable films of the 1960s and ’70s such as “The Cincinnati Kid” and “Save the Tiger” and co-founded Filmways Television, died Wednesday at his home in Bel-Air,Calif. He was 90.

Filmways produced some of the biggest TV hits of the 1960s including “The Beverly Hillbillies,” “The Addams Family,” “Petticoat Junction,” “Green Acres” and “The Hollywood Squares.”

Ransohoff later entered the movie business along with Filmways’ executive John Calley. Their first film was 1962’s “Boys’ Night Out,” followed by 1963’s “The Wheeler Dealers.” He also was behind the 1965 New Orleans-set drama, “The Cincinnati Kid,” which starred Steve McQueen, Edward G. Robinson, Ann-Margret, and Karl Malden. Ransohoff famously fired Sam Peckinpah from the film, feeling his vision was too dark, and hired Norman Jewison to direct.

He exited the company in 1972 to become an independent film producer.

Among his producing credits were Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton’s “The Sandpiper,” Tony Richardson
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hangover Square

No, it’s not a the-day-after sequel to The Lost Weekend, but a class-act mystery-horror from 20th-Fox, at a time when the studio wasn’t keen on scare shows. John Brahm directs the ill-fated Laird Cregar as a mad musician . . . or, at least a musician driven mad by a perfidious femme fatale, Darryl Zanuck’s top glamour girl Linda Darnell.

Hangover Square


Kl Studio Classics

1945 /B&W / 1:37 Academy / 77 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Laird Cregar, Linda Darnell, George Sanders, Faye Marlowe, Glenn Langan, Alan Napier.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Film Editor: Harry Reynolds

Original Music: Bernard Herrmann

Written by Barré Lyndon

Produced by Robert Bassler

Directed by John Brahm

Here’s a serious quality upgrade for horror fans. Although technically a period murder thriller, as a horror film John Brahm’s tense Hangover Square betters its precursor The Lodger in almost every department. We don
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hell on Frisco Bay

I tell you it’s rough out there on Frisco Bay, especially when you say the word ‘Frisco’ within earshot of a proud San Francisco native. This Alan Ladd racketeering tale could have been written twenty years earlier, but it has Warner Color and the early, extra-wide iteration of the new movie attraction CinemaScope.

Hell on Frisco Bay


Warner Archive Collection

1955 / Color / 2:55 widescreen Academy / 98 min. / Street Date , 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Alan Ladd, Edward G. Robinson, Joanne Dru, William Demarest, Paul Stewart, Perry Lopez, Fay Wray, Nestor Paiva, Willis Bouchey, Anthony Caruso, Tina Carver, Rod(ney) Taylor, Jayne Mansfield, Mae Marsh, Tito Vuolo.

Cinematography: John F. Seitz

Film Editor: Folmar Blangsted

Stunts: Paul Baxley

Original Music: Max Steiner

Written by Martin Rackin, Sydney Boehm from a book by William P. McGivern

Produced by George C. Berttholon, Alan Ladd

Directed by Frank Tuttle

Alan Ladd had always been
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Sea Wolf

Now restored to perfection, this genuine classic hasn’t been seen intact for way over sixty years. Michael Curtiz and Robert Rossen adapt Jack London’s suspenseful allegory in high style, with a superb quartet of actors doing some of their best work: Robinson, Garfield, Lupino and newcomer Alexander Knox.

The Sea Wolf


Warner Archive Collection

1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 100 min. uncut! / Street Date October 10, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Edward G. Robinson, Alexander Knox, Ida Lupino, John Garfield, Gene Lockhart, Barry Fitzgerald. Stanley Ridges, David Bruce, Francis McDonald, Howard Da Silva, Frank Lackteen, Ralf Harolde

Cinematography: Sol Polito

Film Editor: George Amy

Art Direction: Anton Grot

Special Effects: Byron Haskin, Hans F. Koenekamp

Original Music: Erich Wolfgang Korngold

Written by Robert Rosson, from the novel by Jack London

Produced by Hal B. Wallis, Henry Blanke

Directed by Michael Curtiz

Chopping up films for television was once the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Curious Languor of Robert Mitchum

  • MUBI
Everyone notices the eyes first, languid, those of a somnambulist. Robert Mitchum, calm and observant, is a presence that, through passivity, enamors a viewer. His face is as effulgent as moonlight. The man smolders, with that boozy, baritone voice, seductive and soporific, a cigarette perched between wispy lips below which is a chin cleft like a geological fault. He’s slithery with innuendo. There’s an effortless allure to it all, a mix of malaise and braggadocio, a cocksure machismo and a hint of fragility. He’s ever-cool, a paradox, “radiating heat without warmth,” as Richard Brody said. A poet, a prodigious lover and drinker, a bad boy; his penchant for marijuana landed him in jail, and in the photographs from his two-month stay he looks like a natural fit. He sits, wrapped in denim, legs spread wide, hair shiny and slick, holding a cup of coffee. His mouth is
See full article at MUBI »

Kid Galahad

He sings, he fixes cars, and he takes punches better than De Niro’s Raging Bull. Elvis Presley excels in one of his few ’60s pictures that shows an interest in being a ‘real movie,’ a remake of a boxing saga with entertaining characters and fine direction from noir specialist Phil Karlson. Plus Charles Bronson, Lola Albright and Joan Blackman in standout roles.

Kid Galahad


Twilight Time

1962 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 95 min. / Street Date August 14, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Elvis Presley, Gig Young, Lola Albright, Joan Blackman, Charles Bronson, Robert Emhardt, Liam Redmond, Judson Pratt, Ned Glass, George Mitchell, Roy Roberts, Michael Dante, Richard Devon, Jeff Morris, Edward Asner, Frank Gerstle, Seamon Glass, Bert Remsen.

Cinematography: Burnett Guffey

Film Editor: Stuart Gilmore

Original Music: Jeff Alexander

Written by William Fay, Francis Wallace

Produced by David Weisbart

Directed by Phil Karlson

What, a good Elvis Presley picture?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Stranger

Edward G. Robinson uncovers another killer, but this time he’s after a Nazi mass murderer, not an insurance salesman. Orson Welles’ most conventional thriller is a masterpiece of style and judgment, with a good sense of time and place – and a lot of expressive shadows. How does this new Blu-ray shape up in comparison to earlier presentations?

The Stranger


Olive Films

1946 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 95 min. / Street Date August 29, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Edward G. Robinson, Loretta Young, Orson Welles, Philip Merivale, Richard Long, Konstantin Shayne, Billy House.

Cinematography: Russell Metty

Production Design: Perry Ferguson

Art Direction: Albert S. D’Agostino

Film Editor: Ernest Nims

Original Music: Bronislau Kaper

Written by Anthony Veiller, Decla Dunning, Victor Trivas

Produced by Sam Spiegel

Directed by Orson Welles

Up pops Olive Films with another Blu-ray of Orson Welles’ impressive The Stranger, for the first time an HD scan
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Forgotten: Howard Hawks' "Tiger Shark" (1932)

  • MUBI
The critical consensus about Howard Hawks' themes and talents strikes me as bang on. The Cahiers critics identified him as a classic auteur, continually exploring characters and situations he had an affinity for, and in a consistent style. The surprise is it took so long for style and characters to come together to form the Hawks we know: his best early films are outliers, and only gradually did he come to explore the kind of group dynamics, sexual sparring and codes of professionalism with which he's now justly associated.Early 1930s Hawks just isn't quite all there yet, but you can see lots of Hawksian characters and themes struggling to come together and be their ideal selves.This one has Edward G. Robinson as a "Portagee" fisherman with a Chico Marx accent and an earring. For some reason, Hawks didn't really connect effectively with the urban tough guy actors until Bogart came his way,
See full article at MUBI »

Double Indemnity Screens April 12th at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“Yes, I killed him. I killed him for money – and a woman – and I didn’t get the money and I didn’t get the woman. Pretty, isn’t it?”

Double Indemnity screens Wednesday April 12th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as the second installment of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Cold-blooded, brutal, and stylishly directed by Billy Wilder, Double Indemnity is a prime example of The Film Noir genre and remains highly influential in its look, attitude and story. The 1944 crime drama set the pattern for that distinctive post-war genre: a shadowy, nighttime urban world of deception and betrayal usually distinguished by its “hard-boiled” dialogue, corrupt characters and the obligatory femme fatale who preys on the primal urges of an ordinary Joe hungry for sex and easy wealth.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Classics In The Loop’ – Wednesday Night ‘Classic Crime & Noir’ Film Series at The Tivoli Begins April 5th

There’s nothing more fun than getting to watch classic movies the way they were intended–on the big screen!

Now, I understand plenty of people don’t want to go to a theater, spend a fortune on tickets, popcorn, and a drink just to see the glow of cell phones and hear people rudely talking while someone kicks your seat from behind, but that’s not the experience you’ll get at Landmark theaters affordable ‘Crime & Noir’ film series. St. Louis movie buffs are in for a treat as Landmark’s The Tivoli Theater will return with it’s ‘Classics on the Loop’ every Wednesday beginning April 5th at 7pm. This season, the Tivoli will screen, on their big screen (which seats 320 btw), eight crime and noir masterpiece that need to be seen in a theater with an audience. Admission is only $7.

One benefits of the big screen is
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Who Should Win the 2017 Oscars? How Variety’s Critics Would Vote

Who Should Win the 2017 Oscars? How Variety’s Critics Would Vote
The ballots are in, and the Oscars are but days away. Variety critics Peter Debruge, Owen Gleiberman, and Guy Lodge may not be Academy members, but if they were, here’s how they would have voted in the top eight categories.

Peter Debruge

Best Picture: “Moonlight.” Nothing against “La La Land,” whose realist take on contemporary romance brings a welcome edge to the fizzy old-fashioned song-and-dance format, but “Moonlight” marks the artistic breakthrough here — and not just because the Oscars (and the industry at large) have been #sowhite for #solong. Barry Jenkins’ superb portrait of a lonely young man seeking connection in Miami focuses audiences’ attention on the sort of character the movies so often marginalize — or overlook entirely — and makes the specificity of his experience feel universal. I ranked “Hell or High Water” one notch higher on my year-end top 10, but that movie is too similar to 2008 winner “No Country for Old Men
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84

Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84
Richard Schickel, the longtime film critic for Time magazine who also wrote 37 books, mostly on film, and directed a number of documentaries on film subjects, died on Saturday in Los Angeles of complications from a series of strokes, his family told the Los Angeles Times. He was 84.

“He was one of the fathers of American film criticism,” his daughter, writer Erika Schickel, told the Times. “He had a singular voice. When he wrote or spoke, he had an old-fashioned way of turning a phrase. He was blunt and succinct both on the page and in life.”

He wrote and/or directed more than 30 documentaries, mostly for television.

Schickel shared a 1977 Emmy nomination for the documentary “Life Goes to the Movies” and received two nominations in 1987 for the documentary “Minnelli on Minnelli: Liza Remembers Vincente,” which he directed.

Schickel wrote film reviews for Life magazine from 1965 until the magazine folded in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

One of the Greatest Film Noir Stars of Them All? Four Crime Classics to Remember

Dana Andrews movies: Film noir actor excelled in both major and minor crime dramas. Dana Andrews movies: First-rate film noir actor excelled in both classics & minor fare One of the best-looking and most underrated actors of the studio era, Dana Andrews was a first-rate film noir/crime thriller star. Oftentimes dismissed as no more than a “dependable” or “reliable” leading man, in truth Andrews brought to life complex characters that never quite fit into the mold of Hollywood's standardized heroes – or rather, antiheroes. Unlike the cynical, tough-talking, and (albeit at times self-delusionally) self-confident characters played by the likes of Alan Ladd, Edward G. Robinson, James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, and, however lazily, Robert Mitchum, Andrews created portrayals of tortured men at odds with their social standing, their sense of ethics, and even their romantic yearnings. Not infrequently, there was only a very fine line separating his (anti)heroes from most movie villains.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hidden Figures and The Hope for More Real Science Stories

There’s a whole world of science stories just waiting to be told.

Theodore Melfi’s Hidden Figures is a wonderful victory tale, both in the true story it depicts and in how it has, as a film about Black women in Stem, been so warmly received by audiences. A lot of attention has been given to the first half (that is, it being a film centered around three Black women), and rightly so. As a Black woman, I left the film with a proud smile only somewhat tempered by the wistful thought that I wished such a film had been around when I was a little girl. But today I want to shine a light on the second part — the part where Hidden Figures demonstrates that fact-based films revolving around Stem (short for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) history can have mass appeal. More importantly, how Hidden Figures serves as a sort of blueprint as to
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Video Essay. Master of Perspective: Fritz Lang's "Scarlet Street"

  • MUBI
The eighteenth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin. Mubi will be showing Fritz Lang's Scarlet Street (1945) from December 30, 2016 - January 28, 2017 in the United States. In Fritz Lang’s masterpiece Scarlet Street (1945) it is never simply a matter of characters seeing or not seeing something important—although that can furnish the first, basic level of the intrigue. It is also a matter of what people really understand of what they see—which, in turn, has much to do with what they, consciously or unconsciously, project onto what is before their eyes. So, while the film is full of moments where its central figure, the ‘poor sap’ Chris Cross (Edward G. Robinson), has his eyes averted, or doesn’t hear someone creeping behind his back, it also explores his willful blindness: he looks at Kitty (Joan Bennett) and sees an innocent angel where,
See full article at MUBI »

Boss Man: Interview with the director and star of Live by Night, Ben Affleck

  • Cineplex
Boss Man: Interview with the director and star of Live by Night, Ben AffleckBoss Man: Interview with the director and star of Live by Night, Ben AffleckBob Strauss - Cineplex Magazine1/12/2017 10:01:00 Am

Back in the day, Warner Bros. was known for making tough crime movies and the roster of stars — Humphrey Bogart, James Cagney, Edward G. Robinson, George Raft — who headlined them.

Things have changed a lot in Hollywood since the old contract-player days. However, if there’s any talent who’s identified with a particular studio at the moment, it’s Ben Affleck.

The square-jawed, 44-year-old Bostonian produced, directed and starred in Warner Bros.’ last Best Picture Oscar winner, Argo. He’s also made The Town and The Accountant for the company in the past few years. And Affleck not only plays the most important character, Batman/Bruce Wayne, in Warner’s latest round of DC Comics-based movies,
See full article at Cineplex »

Can we have more of Tom Cruise the actor please?

Simon Brew Dec 8, 2016

Tom Cruise continues to deliver in blockbuster movies: but it can't just be us who'd love to see him making a few more leftfield choices.

Over the weekend, we got the release of the trailer for 2017’s The Mummy movie. In it, as many were quick to point out, Tom Cruise is soon running again. Few actors run with the speed and intensity of Tom Cruise on the big screen, and few actors seem committed to the productions they take on in the manner that Cruise is. Whenever we’ve interviewed anyone to do with a Tom Cruise movie, they all volunteer just how far the man goes out of his way to have a chat, make them feel settled, and make them feel part of things.

See related Matt Reeves interview: Dawn, Andy Serkis and blockbuster filmmaking Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes review

Appreciating it’s internet law,
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